1930s Stetson Montecristi Optimo Panama Hat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271871678336
This vintage hat was made in the 1930s by the John B Stetson company from a high quality Equadorian Panama hat body and was sold by The Coop, Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is blocked with an Optimo crown, and sports a backwoven brim edge. The 1930s Stetson size tag is heavily faded but reads 1/8, though it measures out to a size seven.

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Cushman Japan reproduction wool half-belt jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281687597362
This jacket was made by high end Japanese manufacturer Cushman, inspired by a mid 1930s workwear jacket. It is made from gray and eggplant plaid wool, with a half-belt back, built in vest, handwarmer pockets, belted cuffs, breast pocket and zip front. The jacket has a Waldes main zipper with an early 1930s Talon influenced grommet stopbox. The pocket zipper has a ball and chain pull, again typical of mid 1930s jackets. The jacket is, as was typical of this style of 1930s jackets, unlined. The front panels have a sort of half-lining, from the same wool as the jacket, which folds forward into the attached vest. It has cat-eye buttons. The side adjuster belts have fancy metal buckles. The jacket has a black and yellow label reading, “Outerwear by Cushman, Smarter Styling – Longer Wear”, in addition to a keystone All Wool tag.

Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″ (doubled = 45″)
Sleeve (center of collar to end of cuff): 34″ (roughly equivalent to 18″ shoulders and 25″ sleeves)
Length (collar seam to hem): 25″

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1940s Maine Guide Hudson’s Bay point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271813450865
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat is unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
(doubled = 46″) Shoulder to shoulder: 20-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

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A progression of Hudson’s Bay labels.  This one is a variant of one used from the mid 1930s-1950s

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Allen Blanket stripe western jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281606483003
This vintage jacket was made in the 1950 by the Allen Manufacturing Company of Denver Colorado (western made for westerners for over half a century). The jacket is made from camel colored wool blanket material, with a brown and turquoise striped pattern The jacket has a three button front, with peak lapels, handwarmer pockets concealed in pleats, flapped hip pockets, and fancy yokes front and back. It has a full quilted lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
-Shoulder to shoulder: 17-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32-1/2″

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1930s Sears Hercules plaid mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271772739718
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in the late 1930s for Sears under its Hercules label. It is wool plaid in a double breasted cut, with handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets. As is typical of these earlier production mackinaws, it is unlined.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-3/4″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 30″

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1920s Devine’s Hudson’s Bay Company Point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281584091897
This vintage coat was made in the 1920s from Hudson’s Bay Company Point blankets for Devine’s of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. It is an early style, double breasted, with D-pocket stitched handwarmers and round flapped patch pockets. This particular round pocketed variant of blanket coat was favored by western star, Tom Mix, around this time frame. As is typical of mackinaws of this era, this one is unlined. The coat has decorative stitching at the exposed edge, a holdover from capote styling. It originally had a belt, which would have likely had a button closure, but as is typical, it is no longer with the coat. The blanket is of the pre-war English manufactured type, with a deeper nap than later blankets, and a thick “point”, which is placed on the inside of the coat. It bears the style Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket label which ceased being used in the late 1920s, and a typically 1920s black and yellow manufacturers tag, which reads, “Made Expressly for Devine’s, Soo Canada”.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 37″

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1930 dated US Army Tunic

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281585059436
This vintage army jacket was made in September of 1930 (inspected Sept. 17). It is made of olive drab wool, with fishmouth lapels and a four button front. It has the fitted silhouette and seams of a WWII tunic. It has royal blue panels inside, which appear to be original, but which I have not seen on other tunics of this era. This one was at some point, probably in the later 1930s, de-militarized for civilian usage by removing the epaulettes, the sam browne belt hooks, the two breast pockets and by adding different buttons. Then as now, army surplus was popular as inexpensive and high-quality outdoor wear and workwear.

Tagged size: 36
Chest (pit to pit): 19″ (doubled = 38″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

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Swedish Army tanker / motorcycle jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271761628954
This vintage jacket was made for the Swedish army. It is an asymmetrical pattern, with a large fold-over map pocket on the center of the chest. It has a cafe-racer style band collar with an adjustable strap to cinch it down. The jacket has a waist belt, adjustable cuffs and reinforcement at the elbows. It is made of very heavy green canvas, with a removable green pile lining for warmth. This is tagged a european size 52, which works out to a US 42. The pattern for these jackets is extremely oversized, as this, along with the matching overalls that would have originally been issued with it, were meant as an top layer with other winter gear underneath.

Tagged size: 52 (equivalent to a US 42)
Chest (pit to pit): 31″ (doubled = 62″)
Waist: 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 23″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (base of collar to hem): 26″

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1950s Albert Richard mouton collared jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271761437968
This vintage jacket was made in the early 1950s by Albert Richard. It is made of dark blue-green gabardine, with a gray collar. It is made in a surcoat style and has flapped patch pockets. The jacket has a style of Talon zipper stopbox which I have not seen before in this application, but a standard early ’50s no. 5 zipper tape and slider. The jacket has a quilted lining. With a buyout in 1953 and a label change, this jacket dates from around 1951-52. This model is pictured in an advertisement from Albert Richard from 1951, see below.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 30″

A bit on the history of Albert Richard:
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability. During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert Richard in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war. President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores. Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

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Levis Vintage Clothing HomeRun Moleskin Worker Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281574492886
This jacket was made by Levis Vintage Clothing as part of their Fall / Winter 2014 “Metropolis” lineup. The official model description is the Levi’s Vintage Homerun Moleskin worker jacket. The tag reads, ” HomeRun Double-Tex Suedette “.
Though the line is described as reproductions of clothes made “circa 1940”, this style of shawl collar, button front jacket was popular from about 1928-1933. These days, it is often referred to as an A-1 style by collectors because of the button front. While it shares a common stylistic ancestor with that knit collared model, the two are divergent lines. When originally produced, these were referred to as Cossack Jackets. That name was later applied to the belt-backed leather jackets of the mid 1930s onward. Through other current productions of the style, it has also become known as the “Menlo” or the “Heron” after specific model names. The Home-Run label was originally used by Levi Strauss from the mid 1920s through to about 1940 for a line of children’s and teenager’s clothing. Levi’s Vintage Clothing resurrected the label design for the some of 1930s workwear reproductions in this Metropolis line. It is a very nice reproduction of the style, made in a durable moleskin cotton. The jacket has a seven button front, with small flapped pockets. It has a shawl collar, and triangular side panels with belt adjusters. The belt’s buckles are reproductions of vintage hammered style hardware. As is typical of this style of jacket, it us unlined. It has ventilation grommets and shirt style cuffs. With a 42″ chest, this would best fit a size 38.

Tagged Size: Men’s Medium
Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24-1/4″

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