Vertical Stripe Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401060646706

This vintage coat was made in the 1960s from English made Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets.  In a departure from the usual way that these blankets are turned into coats, this one has the stripes running vertically, giving it a very mod look. It has 3/4 length sleeves.
Pit to pit: 24-1/2″ (doubled = 49″)
Sleeve (center of collar to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 40

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1940s Hudsons Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272099346046

This vintage coat was made in the 1940s-1950s by the Hudson’s Bay Company from their Hudson’s Bay Point blankets.  This one is made in the rare brown on brown color scheme, with the black and red being more common in that era.  It is double breasted, with a belted waist and a half-lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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1920s Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271986480282
This vintage coat was made in the mid 1920s from Hudson’s Bay point blanket material. It is made in an early style mackinaw cut, double breasted with cargo pockets (but no handwarmers), and with even button spacing all the way to the top, similar to early peacoats. As is typical for these early cuts, the coat is unlined. It bears a style of label which stopped being used by Hudson’s Bay in the late 1920s. These early blankets are also easily discernible from more modern ones by their heavier weight and deeper nap.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 34″

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Brown Hudson’s Bay Company Point Blanket Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401004264328
This vintage coat was made in the 1950s from brown on brown Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets. It has a double breasted, toggle style closure, with a broad collar and both handwarmer and flapped patch cargo pockets. It has a full yellow lining. These are rare o find in the brown color scheme, with the red and black being most common, followed by the multi-stripe.

Chest (pit to pit): 24-1/2″ (doubled = 49″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 28-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 38″

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1930s Guiterman Brothers Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket Mackinaw Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271821794567
This vintage coat was made in the 1930s in St Paul, Minnesota by Guiterman Brothers, who at that point were owned by Gordon and Ferguson. The coat is tailored from red Hudson’s Bay Company Point blanket material, and bears the label used by them in this 1930s timeframe. The Guiterman Brothers label has been partially worn away, but Guiterman is partially legible, as is the GB crest. The coat is double breasted, with points showing, and the black portion of the blanket used as contrast for the collar.

A bit about Guiterman Bros, from a piece I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”
Guiterman Brothers was founded in 1883 and incorporated in 1904. They began using the Summit “Town & Country” name in 1904. In the early 1910s, Guiterman Brothers pioneered the attached soft collared shirt. They also called it the Summit. The company had a plant at 352 Silbey Street, St. Paul, MN, which still stands. They enjoyed prosperity during the 1910s, riding the Mackinaw boom of 1915. They were supposedly the first company to coin the name “windbreaker”. As shown above, their “Town and Country” Coats and vests shared the distinctive double snap Knit-Nek. During WWI, Guiterman Bros. produced flying coats for US aviators. In 1928-1929, the company was purchased by Gordon and Ferguson.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled – 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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1920s red Hudson’s Bay point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281636805140
This vintage coat was made in the 1920s by the Hudson’s Bay company. It is made of red HBC point blanket material, in a classic double breasted mackinaw cut. The points are located on the side seam and the black portion of the blanket has been used for contrast on the belt loops. The coat is, as was typical of mackinaws of this period, unlined. The label is a rare early variant, used up to the mid 1920s, when it was amended with registration numbers, as is seen on another, slightly later HBC mackinaw I’m currently selling. For a full rundown of the HBC labels used on these coats, please look at the chart I produced below.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

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1940s Maine Guide Hudson’s Bay point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271813450865
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat is unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
(doubled = 46″) Shoulder to shoulder: 20-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

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A progression of Hudson’s Bay labels.  This one is a variant of one used from the mid 1930s-1950s

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1930s Belt-Back Hudson’s Bay Company Point Blanket Mackinaw Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281632159457
This vintage coat was made in the mid 1930s from English-made Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket wool. The coat is a classic double breasted mackinaw cut, with the points prominently displayed. The coat has a fancy back, with a scalloped yoke and center pleat with flanking pleats. The cuffs have button adjusters in the black contrast portion of the blanket fabric. As is typical of mackinaws of this period, the coat is unlined with taped seams. It features the Hudson’s Bay crest used in the late 1920s-1930s. With the particular usage of the black portion of the blanket for trimming the pockets and cuffs, as well as the raw hem, a holdover from capote stylings, I would guess the manufacturer of this particular coat as Congress Sportswear, which would have used the Maine Guide label.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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1950s blanket stripe Ario’s Western jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281601270188
This vintage jacket was made in the 1950s for Ario’s of Great Falls, Montana (serving the stockman since 1897). Ario’s was founded by Victor Ario as a saddlery, and developed into a full outfitter. Ario’s son, who took over the business, retired in 1957 and the company became the H Bar O saddlery. From the styling of this jacket, I would put it in the mid 1950s timeframe. It has the typical styling of a western jacket, heavy weight fabric, peak lapels, bi-swing shoulders and a square bottom. This one is made of striped blanket material. The pattern is similar to Pendleton’s Glacier National Park blanket or a Hudson’s Bay point blanket, though the stripes are out of order from the arrangement found on those mills, so I’m not positive what company produced the fabric. The yoke work is some of the most detailed I’ve seen, with sharp cutaways, and is mirrored on the design of the pocket flaps. The jacket is fully lined, and has a model tag reading, Montana.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29-1/2″

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1920s Devine’s Hudson’s Bay Company Point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281584091897
This vintage coat was made in the 1920s from Hudson’s Bay Company Point blankets for Devine’s of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. It is an early style, double breasted, with D-pocket stitched handwarmers and round flapped patch pockets. This particular round pocketed variant of blanket coat was favored by western star, Tom Mix, around this time frame. As is typical of mackinaws of this era, this one is unlined. The coat has decorative stitching at the exposed edge, a holdover from capote styling. It originally had a belt, which would have likely had a button closure, but as is typical, it is no longer with the coat. The blanket is of the pre-war English manufactured type, with a deeper nap than later blankets, and a thick “point”, which is placed on the inside of the coat. It bears the style Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket label which ceased being used in the late 1920s, and a typically 1920s black and yellow manufacturers tag, which reads, “Made Expressly for Devine’s, Soo Canada”.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 37″

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