1920s red Hudson’s Bay point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281636805140
This vintage coat was made in the 1920s by the Hudson’s Bay company. It is made of red HBC point blanket material, in a classic double breasted mackinaw cut. The points are located on the side seam and the black portion of the blanket has been used for contrast on the belt loops. The coat is, as was typical of mackinaws of this period, unlined. The label is a rare early variant, used up to the mid 1920s, when it was amended with registration numbers, as is seen on another, slightly later HBC mackinaw I’m currently selling. For a full rundown of the HBC labels used on these coats, please look at the chart I produced below.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

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1930s Belt-Back Hudson’s Bay Company Point Blanket Mackinaw Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281632159457
This vintage coat was made in the mid 1930s from English-made Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket wool. The coat is a classic double breasted mackinaw cut, with the points prominently displayed. The coat has a fancy back, with a scalloped yoke and center pleat with flanking pleats. The cuffs have button adjusters in the black contrast portion of the blanket fabric. As is typical of mackinaws of this period, the coat is unlined with taped seams. It features the Hudson’s Bay crest used in the late 1920s-1930s. With the particular usage of the black portion of the blanket for trimming the pockets and cuffs, as well as the raw hem, a holdover from capote stylings, I would guess the manufacturer of this particular coat as Congress Sportswear, which would have used the Maine Guide label.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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1920s Devine’s Hudson’s Bay Company Point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281584091897
This vintage coat was made in the 1920s from Hudson’s Bay Company Point blankets for Devine’s of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. It is an early style, double breasted, with D-pocket stitched handwarmers and round flapped patch pockets. This particular round pocketed variant of blanket coat was favored by western star, Tom Mix, around this time frame. As is typical of mackinaws of this era, this one is unlined. The coat has decorative stitching at the exposed edge, a holdover from capote styling. It originally had a belt, which would have likely had a button closure, but as is typical, it is no longer with the coat. The blanket is of the pre-war English manufactured type, with a deeper nap than later blankets, and a thick “point”, which is placed on the inside of the coat. It bears the style Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket label which ceased being used in the late 1920s, and a typically 1920s black and yellow manufacturers tag, which reads, “Made Expressly for Devine’s, Soo Canada”.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 37″

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Penney’s plaid hunting jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271722719546
This vintage hunting coat was made in the 1950s for Penney’s. It is made of heavy black and red plaid with a buffalo plaid lining. The coat has snapped cargo pockets and game pocket entry as well as handwarmers. It has a Talon zipper front.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1950s Zero King hudson’s bay point blanket jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271738364402
This vintage jacket was made in the 1950s by Zero King Sports Apparel. It is tailored from a red and black point blanket, possibly Hudson’s Bay, but there are no mill tags on it. The jacket is single breasted, with a zipper front. The original zipper has been replaced with a vinyl YKK, which works well. The jacket has caped shoulders, similar to earlier Carss mackinaw detailing. It is partially lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

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1950s red wool American Field hunting jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281560039758
This vintage hunting jacket was made in the 1950s in Toledo, Ohio by the Hettrick Manufacturing Company under their American Field Sportswear label. The jacket is made from red wool, with handwarmer pockets and buttoned, flapped cargo pockets. It has access to an internal game pocket through buttoned slits on the side seams. The coat has a cotton flannel lining and viscose rayon sleeve linings.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1940s Maine Guide Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281537094331
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat is unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
(doubled = 46″) Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35=1/2″

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