Toyo Grizzly repro jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401043302889

This jacket is a high end reproduction of the “Grizzly” style jacket, popular in the mid 1930s. It was made by Toyo Enterprises, who make jackets for Buzz Rickson, Sugar Cane and Style Eyes. Accurate down to the last detail, it bears a reproduction of a 1930s “Lakeland” hang tag. It has “Laskinlamb” mouton panels on the front and back, with a matching mouton collar. The sleeves and trim are horsehide leather. The idea of these jackets was to put the insulation on the outside so that the wearer could have an unobstructed range of motion. They were promoted heavily in an athletic context, promoted by football players, that sort of thing. This jacket is as near as you can get to walking into a store in 1935 and buying one. The main zip is a repro of a Hookless grommet zipper, and the throat latch has a repro dot snap. The original tags are still on the jacket and include a nice reproduction piece to accompany that zip. The front of the jacket is belted, as are the sleeves. There is a snap chinstrap to cinch it up at the neck. Inside, the body has a plaid lining, while the sleeves are lined in mustard twill. There are wool storm cuffs to keep the breeze from blowing up the sleeves.
Tagged size: 38
Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24-3/4″
Waist: 18-3/8″ (doubled = 36-3/4″)

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1928-1932 Spalding Aviation Clothing leather flight suit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272051885112

This vintage leather flight suit was made by A.G. Spalding & Bros. Aviation Clothing, between 1928 and 1932. It has a mouton collar, an offset closure, belted waist, large map pocket with sharply scalloped pocket flap, thigh pockets and a full silk pile lining. It is a size 42, and is their model 402. The suit has seven Hookless Fastener Co. Talon zippers, with the double marked sliders that indicate a date of manufacture between 1928, when the name Talon was introduced, and 1932, when Hookless dropped their company name from the product in favor of simply “Talon”. The zips are on the sleeves, legs, the chest and on two pass through pockets so the aviator could access his pants pockets.  The fly opening is accomplished by a snap on the zipper tape.  The large collar has a hook closure at the neck and a three button throat latch under the collar, to really secure it during open cockpit flight. While not his suit, Charles Lindbergh was a prominent endorser of Spalding’s flight suits of this era.

Tagged size: 42
Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Inseam: 28″
Length (base of collar to bottom of belt): 22″
Length (top of collar to bottom of leg): 61-1/2″
The flight suit has the original boots, also made by A.G. Spalding & Bros. Aviation Clothing. These are moccasin style, with a lace up front and Hookless Talon zipper back.  They are fully sheepskin lined for warmth, with a double layer moccasin sole and tongues front and back.  They are a large size, measuring 12-3/4″ front to back, and 4-5/8″ side to side and comfortably fitting my size 12 foot.  Inside are sheepskin slippers, which appear to be of slightly later manufacture, either added for extra warmth, or more likely to down-size the boots for a second owner.
Lastly, there are two flight helmets, one original to the suit and also made by A.G. Spalding & Bros. Aviation Clothing and another unlabeled one.  The Spalding cap is a size 7-3/8 model 1900 and has Spalding baseball branded snaps for the goggle retainers.  The second cap is unmarked, with a snap closure and ear grommets.
Note: gloves are not part of the suit, and were for photographs only, they are not included.

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Early 1930s cut down Cossack Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271934443374
This vintage jacket was made in the early 1930s, probably between about 1930 and 1934. This style, with the plain back, side panels with buckle adjusters, leather waistband and small patch pockets, was one of the first jacket styles to become popular following the invention of the separable bottomed zipper in 1930. The jacket has a buttoned throat latch / chinstrap, and while the zipper is a 1950s Conmar, replacing what would likely have been a double branded Hookless/Talon, the grommets from the original zip are still in place at the waistband.

Chest (pit to pit): 18″ (doubled = 36″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 15″
Length (base of collar to hem): 23-1/2″

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1930s Canvas Backpack

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271872414732
made in the 1930s. It is made of canvas, with taped seams, heavy webbing straps, riveted to the bag, and with a buckle closure on one side to make taking the bag off and putting it on easier. There is a zippered pocket with an early style round hole Talon zipper, a re-tooling of earlier Hookless dies. The name Robert Brunelle is written inside the top of the bag.

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1920s-1930s Hookless zipper boot ashtray

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281666464193
BF Goodrich introduced the Zipper Boot in 1923. It was one of the earliest successful uses of the Hookless Slide Fastener. The fastener became so inseparable from the boot in these early years that the boot’s name, the Zipper came to be the generic term for what had previously been called the Hookless slide fastener. This ashtray depicts the early version of the boot, from about 1924, which features the no-hole version of the Hookless fastener.

 

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A period advertisement for Hookless, showing a close-up view of the type of fastener depicted on this ashtray.  Ad shown for descriptive purposes, and is not included with the ashtray.

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1920s goatskin leggings with Hookless zippers

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271833931339
These vintage leggings were made in the 1920s, and are marked the Improved Standard Drawer Legging style 912, size 6. They are made of brown goatskin, with a side zipper. The zipper is an early production Hookless, produced before the patent numbers on the reverse, which, along with period advertisements for this style, would place the date of manufacture around 1924-1925. The separable bottomed zipper wasn’t invented at this point and wasn’t put into production by Hookless/Talon until early 1930. By that point, the strictly Hookless branded sliders, as found on these, had been phased out, replaced by Talon branded ones of the same shape. These leggings, of course, have the non-separable attached end, located at the calf. These are marked a size 6 and measure 4″ (8″ doubled) at the ankle, 6″ (12″ doubled) at the thigh, and 14-1/2″ long.

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Cushman Japan reproduction wool half-belt jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281687597362
This jacket was made by high end Japanese manufacturer Cushman, inspired by a mid 1930s workwear jacket. It is made from gray and eggplant plaid wool, with a half-belt back, built in vest, handwarmer pockets, belted cuffs, breast pocket and zip front. The jacket has a Waldes main zipper with an early 1930s Talon influenced grommet stopbox. The pocket zipper has a ball and chain pull, again typical of mid 1930s jackets. The jacket is, as was typical of this style of 1930s jackets, unlined. The front panels have a sort of half-lining, from the same wool as the jacket, which folds forward into the attached vest. It has cat-eye buttons. The side adjuster belts have fancy metal buckles. The jacket has a black and yellow label reading, “Outerwear by Cushman, Smarter Styling – Longer Wear”, in addition to a keystone All Wool tag.

Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″ (doubled = 45″)
Sleeve (center of collar to end of cuff): 34″ (roughly equivalent to 18″ shoulders and 25″ sleeves)
Length (collar seam to hem): 25″

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