1930s m1926 army mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281272498743
This vintage mackinaw was made in the 1930s for the US Army. This coat is lined with Earl-Glo rayon, a material which hit the market in 1927. This label is consistent with the ones used by Earl-Glo in the early 1930s. These pre-war mackinaws are much rarer than their WWII issued counterparts, and were worn as part of the work uniform by the Civilian Conservation Corps.
The coat is unlined, a defining feature of the pre-war pattern. This is also typical of the civilian work mackinaws from which this design descended. The small lining panel at the collar and the seam tape is made of the aforementioned Earl-Glo rayon. The coat is double breasted, with a shawl collar. It has a buttoned belt and buttoned adjuster tabs on the sleeves.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

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1930s Grommet Zipper half-belt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281272035995
This vintage leather jacket was made in the mid 1930s. It is made from capeskin leather, rough side out. As was typical of these early-mid 1930s lightweight half-belt windbreaker styles, this one is unlined. It has an riveted “grommet” Talon zipper, a style which was produced from the early-mid 1930s, before being joined, then replaced by the deco “sunburst” style stopbox. The slider is an early style, with rays on the slider, a small hole puller, and an attachment section which is more oval shaped than those produced later in the 1930s. The jacket is a waist length Cossack style, and has a fancy pleated, belted back with side adjuster belts.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 16-3/4″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 21″

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1960s Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271404687198
This vintage coat was made in the early 1960s by the Hudson’s Bay Company from their iconic multi-stripe point blankets. It is their “Olympic” model, a belted, double breasted style with tab adjusters at the wrists, handwarmer pockets at the chest and patch pockets on the hips. The style was made, essentially unchanged, since the 1920s. Whereas some blanket mackinaws of this style were made using the Hudson’s Bay fabric by other manufacturers, this one was made and sold by Hudson’s Bay themselves. This is the same style and era as was worn by the Canadian Olympic team at the 1964 Innsbruck Winter Olympic games. The stripes on this one are inverted from what most are – usually you see the indigo stripe on the bottom. However, even looking at the photos of the Canadian Olympic team all wearing matching versions of this coat, a percentage have this rarer flipped design. The position of the stripes relative to the features of the coats differ in nearly every coat in those pictures as well. I suppose each cutter had their own way of positioning the pattern. The coat is fully lined, which, along with the particular style of label, distinguish it from earlier manufacture coats.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

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1941 Jacob Siegel Co. Army Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281268073559
This vintage Officer’s Short Overcoat / Shawl Collar Mackinaw was made in 1941 by the Jacob Siegel Company under contract for the US Army. This style coat was a direct descendant of the shawl collar workwear mackinaws of the 1910s-1930s, and from the m-1926 mackinaw worn by the Army and the Civilian Conservation Corps before the war. It is a double breasted style, with a broad shawl collar, epaulettes, and a belted waist. The coat is fully lined with an interior breast pocket. There are stitch marks on the sleeves from a six pointed star patch and a round patch.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

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1920s Drybak hunting coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271403958670
This vintage hunting jacket was made in the late 1920s or 1930s. From the details, it’s likely this coat was made by Drybak. The coat is made of densely woven brown canvas, with a corduroy collar and cuffs. There are handwarmer pockets, cargo pockets and closed bottom shell loops. The shoulders are reinforced, and there is an internal buttoned game pouch. These unlined game pockets are typical of the earlier production hunting jackets. Models from the 1930s and on generally had some sort of waterproof lining. The arm panel forms a gusset for a greater range of motion. The underarms have four ventilation grommets each.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22″
Length (base of collar to hem): 27″

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Drybak “The Feather”

This vintage hunting jacket was made by Drybak in the 1940s. It is made of their “The Feather” lightweight canvas, and has a ton of great detailing. The handwarmer pockets form both the pocket flaps for the cargo pockets as well as covers for the shotgun shell loops. The cargo pockets are saddlebag style to allow for expansion when full. The jacket has a belted action back. The shoulders are a double layer of canvas for extra reinforcement. The collar is corduroy and has a flap and strap on the back which buttons down – a sort of half-hood to keep the elements out when the collar is flipped up. The bottom panel of the sleeve is extended to form the panel which would usually be a football shaped gusset. The game pouch buttons open, has scovill snaps to extend it, bellows-style, and bell shaped Conmar zippers to open it fully for easier loading, unloading and cleaning.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 30″

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1940s green Maine Guide blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281267936264
This vintage coat was made by Congress Sportswear under the “Maine Guide” label just after the end of WWII. The coat is made from green wool blanket fabric, in a four pocket, zipper front style. The zipper is of the mid to late 1940s design, with a square cornered puller, and a “Talon” marked stopbox. The tag is of Maine Guide’s pre-1947 design. The coat is mostly unlined save for the shoulders. It has shirt style cuffs.

Maine Guide was known for its elaborate Hudson’s Bay point blanket cots. This one is simplified and does not bear the HBC label, but putting it side by side with the other green Maine Guide coat I have currently, the two are nearly identical. Maine Guide made heavy use of the black stripe portion of their blankets for trim. I wouldn’t be surprised if they had this slightly simplified line to make use of the surplus background blanket wool.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 30″

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