Jeffrey Banks / Lakeland blanket coat

 

This coat was made in the late 1970s by Lakeland, and was designed by Jeffrey Banks, in the early days of his career.  It is a classic double breasted peacoat/mackinaw style, made in red and black striped blanket material. The coat draws heavy influence from earlier decades and Lakeland products, like the 1947 “Jackinac”. The silhouette and material are straight out of the 1930s or 1940s, but updated with more modern luxuries like a quilted liner. The Lakeland x Jeffrey Banks line of the late 1970s and early 1980s was made up of these reproduction pieces, in the same way the current Ralph Lauren RRL line is today.  Another can be seen here: https://vintagehaberdashers.com/2013/12/16/jeffrey-banks-lakeland-shawl-collar-mackinaw/

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Western Costume shawl collar jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281231689469
This vintage jacket came from the warehouses of Western Costume of Hollywood, and was used in Westerns and in 19th century period pieces. With the texture of the fabric and the placement of the pockets, I would guess that this was probably cut down from an old shawl collared overcoat or mackinaw, and had the collar trim and extra buttonholes added by Western Costume. The jacket has fairly heavy wear, which is to be expected from something that’s been in a movie costume department for decades.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length: 20″

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1920s Bedford Cord breeches

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281231706265
These vintage breeches were made in the 1920s. They are made out of a gray Bedford cord. At some point around 1930, the original owner upgraded them, reinforcing the pocket edges with heavy brown leather, probably elk or deer. He also removed the original belt loops, replacing them with black leather, and extended the legs 2-1/2″ with black leather. The extensions do up with flower patterned snaps, which help date the work. They are a transitional style, with male ends marked “USF Co”, and female ends marked “United Carr”. “USF” stands for “United States Fastener”. They merged with Carr Fastener in 1929 to form “United Carr”, but for a short time during the transition, they used the old USF toolings.
The breeches have a watch pocket, one flapped back pocket and one open. The legs button closed, and the pants have a button fly.

Waist (side to side): 18″ (doubled = 36″)
Inseam: 26″
Outseam: 38″

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WWI army pullover shirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271352941389
This is a WWI army shirt. It is a pullover style, with two large breast pockets, a three button front, and elbow reinforcements. The tails are gusseted.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22″
Length: 30″
Collar: 14″

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Mid 1940s Albert Richard leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271352480738
This vintage leather jacket was made by Albert Richard in the mid 1940s. It is made of “Chevro-Kid” goatskin. This trade name was typical of Albert Richards’s naming schemes during WWII and shortly after, playing of military terminology. The company could back this up- they produced flight jackets for the army and navy during the war. This jacket is made of the same goatskin used for these Navy flight jacket contracts. The jacket is a hip length style, with flapped saddlebag patch pockets , a straight yoke on the front, and a plain back. It was originally belted, but as with many jackets of this style, the belt is long since missing. The zipper is a Talon, with a mid 1940s stopbox and a slightly earlier style slider (these combinations were common at this period). The zipper is attached in the “surcoat” style, , where the end of the zip is attached to a triangle of leather which is free from the front of the jacket.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length: 29-1/2″

A bit about Albert Richard, from an article I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”.
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south. Production was low, and this new plant closed almost as soon as it opened.

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1920s Carss Mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271352494287
This vintage coat was made by Carss Mackinaw, probably in the 1920s. This is a rare version. Most were made in striped point blanket material, with four patch pockets and a belted back. This one is made from a wool plaid. It has a squared off shawl collar, with patch breast pockets and handwarmers in a shape which would eventually inspire the D-Pocket found on motorcycle jackets. There are access flaps to an internal game pocket, and adjuster belts, mounted high on the back. The shoulders have pinked capes.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length: 30″

A bit about the company, from a history piece I wrote for “The Fedora Lounge”: Carss Mackinaw made blanket coats in Orillia, Ontario from at least 1897. Their signature model was single breasted with caped shoulders and a squared-off shawl collar. They are most commonly seen in red, green, and khaki, all with a blanket stripe at the base. The fabric used in these coats was advertised as a whopping 44oz, and was sourced from a variety of trade blanket manufacturers, including Hudson’s Bay and the Bird Woolen Mills. They were advertised as “The Only Genuine Mackinaw Made In Canada”. They were retailed by the Hudson’s Bay Company, as well as other stores.

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