Hettrick American Field point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272103123979

This vintage coat was made in the late 1940s-1950s by the Hettrick Mfg. Co of Toledo, Ohio under their “American Field” label.  The coat has some striking similarities to the blanket mackinaws made in this era by Congress Sportswear / Maine Guide, including the raw bottom edge and the rounded collar with peak lapels.  The coat is belted, with buttoned adjusters on the sleeves. More in keeping with the mackinaws of the 1930s, this one is made with unlined construction, save for the rayon lined sleeves.
Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

The Hettrick Mfg. Co. was founded in 1893 (or 1891, depending on the source) in Toledo, Ohio as a manufacturer of canvas goods, largely awnings and wagon covers. In 1921, they launched the “American Field” line of hunting garments. A bit of a late comer to the hunting game, they advertised their coats as designed by an “old timer”. Their factory was located at 1401 Summit Street, Toledo, Ohio. Unlike most of the other manufacturers of hunting clothes, Hettrick maintained their other interests after entering the hunting market, producing everything from canvas lawn chairs to tricycles. Hettrick was purchased by the F&M Real Estate Company of Lowell, MA and in 1962, Hettrick closed its Ohio factories and moved to Statesville, NC to take advantage of the lower cost of manufacturing in the south. They moved production into the factory of the Empire Manufacturing Corp, who continued producing their own line from the same plant, with a secondary factory in Pink Hill, NC. It is unclear whether they were purchased by Empire, sources are conflicting. Empire ran a strongly anti-union shop, threatening employees in 1968 who were attempting to unionize. They were sued by employees, the threats were found to be unlawful and the case was used as an example in a Congressional subcommittee on labor. Shortly thereafter, in 1969, American Field was acquired by the Olin Corporation, manufacturer of Winchester rifles. In 1970, the Hettrick divistion acquired the J. W. Johnson Co of Bellwood, Ill and Dickey Oakwood Corp of Oakwood, Ohio. In 1971, Hettrick merged with Comfy Seattle Co and became Trailblazer by Winchester, “managing transactions for Comfy, the Turner Co., Olin Skiis, J.W. Johnson, Dickey Oakwood”, as well as factories in Pink Hill, Statesville and one in Corcoran, California built in 1970. While Hettrick as a company was absorbed, the Hettrick brand continued to be produced, with production shifted to the Pink Hill plant, reflected on labels. By the 1980s, the operation had been sold again, to WeatherShield Sports Equipment, Inc. (founded 1951) at Petoskey Rd. At Mercer Blvd., Charlevoix, MI. They lasted at least into the 1990s.

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Hercules Fieldmaster blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401051353688

This vintage coat was made in Canada in the 1950s from English made Early’s Witney Point Blanket material and was sold by Sears under their Hercules Fieldmaster label. It has a Milium lining, which, when combined with the incredibly thick blankets used in this make for one of the warmest vintage coats out there.
Tagged size: 38
Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 36-1/2″

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Ralph Lauren blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401036142931

This coat was made for Ralph Lauren and was sold under the Polo label.  It is based upon a c. 1915 shawl collar blanket mackinaw made by Guiterman Bros. The coat is double breasted, with a shawl collar, leather trimmed handwarmer pockets, flapped cargo pockets and a belted waist.  In keeping with the original upon which this style was based, it is unlined. The original retail of this coat was $1195.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 33″

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Early’s Witney Point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401039554675

This vintage coat was made in Canada in the 1950s from English made Early’s Witney Point Blanket material and was sold by Sears under their Hercules Fieldmaster label. It has a Milium lining, which, when combined with the incredibly thick blankets used in this make for one of the warmest vintage coats out there.

Tagged size: 44
Chest (pit to pit): 28″ (doubled = 56″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 33-1/2″

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1930s Belt-Back Hudson’s Bay Company Point Blanket Mackinaw Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281632159457
This vintage coat was made in the mid 1930s from English-made Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket wool. The coat is a classic double breasted mackinaw cut, with the points prominently displayed. The coat has a fancy back, with a scalloped yoke and center pleat with flanking pleats. The cuffs have button adjusters in the black contrast portion of the blanket fabric. As is typical of mackinaws of this period, the coat is unlined with taped seams. It features the Hudson’s Bay crest used in the late 1920s-1930s. With the particular usage of the black portion of the blanket for trimming the pockets and cuffs, as well as the raw hem, a holdover from capote stylings, I would guess the manufacturer of this particular coat as Congress Sportswear, which would have used the Maine Guide label.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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1950s Land-N-Lakes blanket stripe western jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271790824752
This vintage jacket was made in the 1950s by the Herman K. Lavin Company of Saint Paul Minnesota under their Land-N-Lakes label. The jacket is made of striped blanket material, with peak lapels, bi-swing shoulders and fancy yokework front and back. There are handwarmer pockets concealed in the front pleats.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

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1920s Devine’s Hudson’s Bay Company Point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281584091897
This vintage coat was made in the 1920s from Hudson’s Bay Company Point blankets for Devine’s of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. It is an early style, double breasted, with D-pocket stitched handwarmers and round flapped patch pockets. This particular round pocketed variant of blanket coat was favored by western star, Tom Mix, around this time frame. As is typical of mackinaws of this era, this one is unlined. The coat has decorative stitching at the exposed edge, a holdover from capote styling. It originally had a belt, which would have likely had a button closure, but as is typical, it is no longer with the coat. The blanket is of the pre-war English manufactured type, with a deeper nap than later blankets, and a thick “point”, which is placed on the inside of the coat. It bears the style Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket label which ceased being used in the late 1920s, and a typically 1920s black and yellow manufacturers tag, which reads, “Made Expressly for Devine’s, Soo Canada”.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 37″

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1940s overdyed brown Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271738984147
This vintage coat was made in the 1940s by the Hudson’s Bay Company. It is made of the English production blankets, which helps with the dating. The coat has broad shoulders and a double breasted cut. It has handwarmer pockets and a plain back. It appears that the coat was at one point overdyed dark brown. Although Hudson’s Bay did make shorter length bay blanket coats, I have not seen this particular style from them before, which, in combination with the period color change makes me wonder if this was at some point professionally altered from a longer coat. Whatever the case may be, it was done well, and gives it a distinctive and sporty look.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

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1940s Maine Guide Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281537094331
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat is unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
(doubled = 46″) Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35=1/2″

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1930s Pendleton striped blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281537063063
This vintage coat was made in the early 1930s from striped point blanket material. While the Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets had a striped pattern with four stripes at each end of the blanket running indigo, yellow, red, green, this coat was made from a blanket with a continuous stripe patterned blanket running red, orange, indigo, green and then repeating. While there are no labels on this coat, I have seen this blanket pattern attributed to the Pendleton woolen mills. The pattern of the blanket has been inverted for the sleeves and runs vertically for the collar, giving some real interest there. The coat has handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets. It has a double breasted cut and as is typical of mackinaw coats produced in the 1930s and prior, this example was made unlined.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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