1930 dated US Army Tunic

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281585059436
This vintage army jacket was made in September of 1930 (inspected Sept. 17). It is made of olive drab wool, with fishmouth lapels and a four button front. It has the fitted silhouette and seams of a WWII tunic. It has royal blue panels inside, which appear to be original, but which I have not seen on other tunics of this era. This one was at some point, probably in the later 1930s, de-militarized for civilian usage by removing the epaulettes, the sam browne belt hooks, the two breast pockets and by adding different buttons. Then as now, army surplus was popular as inexpensive and high-quality outdoor wear and workwear.

Tagged size: 36
Chest (pit to pit): 19″ (doubled = 38″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

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Early 1930s money belt with Kwik Zipper

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271662212583
This vintage money belt was made in the early 1930s. It is made of leather, with a snapped pocket, and a larger zipped pouch. The zipper is an early 1930s Kwik, made under patents no. 1814244, granted in 1931, patent no. 1752111, granted in 1930 and 1761385, granted in 1930. The snap is an early United Carr and the buckle has a nicely detailed design. The puller on the pin-lock Kwik is obviously influenced by Hookless zips of the same era.

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m1926 army Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271371253018
This vintage coat is an extremely rare pre-war m-1926 army mackinaw (short overcoat). It is double breasted, with a wide shawl collar and large flapped patch pockets. As was typical of early shawl collared mackinaw coats, both military and civilian, it is unlined. The updated version of this coat issued in WWII featured a lining. This pre-war pattern was commonly seen on Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees. Based on the 43″ chest measurement, this would fit best in the 36 to 38 size range.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 33″

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Pre-War R. Plankl loden mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281196380619
This vintage coat was made in Austria before WWII by R. Plankl of Vienna. R. Plankl was founded in 1830, and is one of the oldest and most respected makers and dealers of loden wool goods in the world. While examples of their work from the 1960s and 1970s come on the market fairly regularly, it’s exceedingly rare to see anything from the 1920s or 1930s period.
This coat is made of high quality loden wool, with a nice nap to it. The front follows the basic layout of what in America was called the mackinaw coat. Double breasted, flapped pockets with slash handwarmers above. The sleeves have stylishly angled buttoned adjuster belts. The back of the coat is belted, with a deep pleat starting at the shoulders and continuing to the hem, for additional freedom of motion while wearing the coat. The coat is unlined in most of the body, with a double layer in the front and in the shoulders. There are two buttoned interior pockets. The label is of a style commonly seen in the 1920s and 1930s, with a black background and yellow text. The tag reads ” Wien / R. Plankl / I. Michaelerplatz 6″, and has a logo of a rucksack with crossed ice axes.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length: 33″

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