Early 1930s cut down Cossack Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271934443374
This vintage jacket was made in the early 1930s, probably between about 1930 and 1934. This style, with the plain back, side panels with buckle adjusters, leather waistband and small patch pockets, was one of the first jacket styles to become popular following the invention of the separable bottomed zipper in 1930. The jacket has a buttoned throat latch / chinstrap, and while the zipper is a 1950s Conmar, replacing what would likely have been a double branded Hookless/Talon, the grommets from the original zip are still in place at the waistband.

Chest (pit to pit): 18″ (doubled = 36″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 15″
Length (base of collar to hem): 23-1/2″

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Levis Vintage Clothing HomeRun Moleskin Worker Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281574492886
This jacket was made by Levis Vintage Clothing as part of their Fall / Winter 2014 “Metropolis” lineup. The official model description is the Levi’s Vintage Homerun Moleskin worker jacket. The tag reads, ” HomeRun Double-Tex Suedette “.
Though the line is described as reproductions of clothes made “circa 1940”, this style of shawl collar, button front jacket was popular from about 1928-1933. These days, it is often referred to as an A-1 style by collectors because of the button front. While it shares a common stylistic ancestor with that knit collared model, the two are divergent lines. When originally produced, these were referred to as Cossack Jackets. That name was later applied to the belt-backed leather jackets of the mid 1930s onward. Through other current productions of the style, it has also become known as the “Menlo” or the “Heron” after specific model names. The Home-Run label was originally used by Levi Strauss from the mid 1920s through to about 1940 for a line of children’s and teenager’s clothing. Levi’s Vintage Clothing resurrected the label design for the some of 1930s workwear reproductions in this Metropolis line. It is a very nice reproduction of the style, made in a durable moleskin cotton. The jacket has a seven button front, with small flapped pockets. It has a shawl collar, and triangular side panels with belt adjusters. The belt’s buckles are reproductions of vintage hammered style hardware. As is typical of this style of jacket, it us unlined. It has ventilation grommets and shirt style cuffs. With a 42″ chest, this would best fit a size 38.

Tagged Size: Men’s Medium
Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24-1/4″

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1930s fringed deerskin leather cossack jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271685853101
This vintage leather jacket was made in Mexico. This waist length, button front, leather waistbanded style with triangular side panels, patch pockets and side adjuster belts was popular in the early 1930s. This was the original cossack style jacket before the half-belt back models took over. As was typical of many early leather jackets, this one is unlined. It is marked a size 36 in pen but measures smaller, probably originally worn by a teen.

Chest (pit to pit): 18″ (doubled = 36″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 15″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22″
Length (Base of collar to end of fringe): 21″

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Guiterman Bros 1930s Town and Country leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271307079241
This vintage leather jacket was made in the early to mid 1930s by Guiterman Brothers, under the Town and Country label. The company was founded in 1883, and began the “Town and Country” line in 1904. They produced flying coats for US aviators during World War One, and pioneered early civilian leather jacket designs starting in the 1910s. In c. 1928, the company was bought out by Gordon and Ferguson, who continued the line. This jacket as a rare early example of a button-front Cossack jacket. Early Cossack jackets, c. 1930-c.1934 generally featured leather waistband and plain backs. This is an early example of the transitional style, retaining the collar, cuff and pocket detailing from the early jackets, but moving away into what would become the half-belt jackets of the later 1930s-1950s. The back is belted, with bi-swing shoulders and side adjusters. The front still has an old style button front, instead of a hookless zipper. The jacket buttons right over left, which, along with the shoulder darts, identify this as a women’s jacket. Other than these details, early on, men’s and women’s styles were generally extremely similar patterns. As was typical of many of these early jackets, this one is made with the suede side out. For jackets of this style, it wasn’t until later in the 1930s that weight started to become a major concern. These were really designed as lightweight leather windbreakers for sporting activities. Gordon and Ferguson had the exclusive rights to the Cravenette process for leather, and it is employed on this one.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″
Shoulder to shoulder: 16-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length: 23″

 

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Ad from 1934.
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Ad from 1935
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