Penney’s plaid coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272050117992

This vintage coat was made in the 1950s for Penney’s.  It is made out of a beige wool with a napped surface and overcheck.  It has a Talon zipper front and buttoned side adjusters.

Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″ (doubled = 45″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem):30″

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1940s Montgomery Ward nylon and mouton surcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271881008711
This vintage jacket was made in the late 1940s and was sold by Montgomery Ward. It is made of shiny brown-burgundy nylon, with a crown zipper main zipper, and anchor branded hook closure belt and an elastic waist. It has a quilted lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 27-1/4″

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1946 Albert Richard Spun Sun plaid coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281635072000
This vintage coat was made by Albert Richard in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1946. It is interlined with “Spun Sun” fiberglass insulation, pioneered by Albert Richard immediately after WWII. This model can be seen in the advertisement below. This is the early style “Spun Sun” fabric, before the introduction of the (R) symbol in 1947. Albert Richard was sold and relocated in 1952, closing shortly thereafter. This coat has a three button front, a broad collar and two flapped hip pockets.

Tagged size: 44
Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1950s Albert Richard mouton collared jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271761437968
This vintage jacket was made in the early 1950s by Albert Richard. It is made of dark blue-green gabardine, with a gray collar. It is made in a surcoat style and has flapped patch pockets. The jacket has a style of Talon zipper stopbox which I have not seen before in this application, but a standard early ’50s no. 5 zipper tape and slider. The jacket has a quilted lining. With a buyout in 1953 and a label change, this jacket dates from around 1951-52. This model is pictured in an advertisement from Albert Richard from 1951, see below.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 30″

A bit on the history of Albert Richard:
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability. During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert Richard in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war. President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores. Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

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1950s Zero King hudson’s bay point blanket jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271738364402
This vintage jacket was made in the 1950s by Zero King Sports Apparel. It is tailored from a red and black point blanket, possibly Hudson’s Bay, but there are no mill tags on it. The jacket is single breasted, with a zipper front. The original zipper has been replaced with a vinyl YKK, which works well. The jacket has caped shoulders, similar to earlier Carss mackinaw detailing. It is partially lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

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Reproduction 1940s style belted leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271737199280
This leather jacket was made in the 1980s or so in the style of a 1940s fully belted leather surcoat. The belt buttons on and off like the originals (though most of them have lost their front sections). It has a zipper front (nylon ykk) and a bi-swing back.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

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