Ralph Lauren shawl collar jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272166107419

This jacket was made by Ralph lauren, with a design inspired by point blanket mackinaws.  It has a shawl collar, flecked cotton material, with snaps which reference the early printed designs found on Filson fasteners and buttons based on early Duxbak designs. Really covering all the early outdoorsman influences
 
Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (base of collar to hem): 27-1/2″

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Vertical Stripe Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401060646706

This vintage coat was made in the 1960s from English made Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets.  In a departure from the usual way that these blankets are turned into coats, this one has the stripes running vertically, giving it a very mod look. It has 3/4 length sleeves.
Pit to pit: 24-1/2″ (doubled = 49″)
Sleeve (center of collar to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 40

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Hettrick American Field point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272103123979

This vintage coat was made in the late 1940s-1950s by the Hettrick Mfg. Co of Toledo, Ohio under their “American Field” label.  The coat has some striking similarities to the blanket mackinaws made in this era by Congress Sportswear / Maine Guide, including the raw bottom edge and the rounded collar with peak lapels.  The coat is belted, with buttoned adjusters on the sleeves. More in keeping with the mackinaws of the 1930s, this one is made with unlined construction, save for the rayon lined sleeves.
Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

The Hettrick Mfg. Co. was founded in 1893 (or 1891, depending on the source) in Toledo, Ohio as a manufacturer of canvas goods, largely awnings and wagon covers. In 1921, they launched the “American Field” line of hunting garments. A bit of a late comer to the hunting game, they advertised their coats as designed by an “old timer”. Their factory was located at 1401 Summit Street, Toledo, Ohio. Unlike most of the other manufacturers of hunting clothes, Hettrick maintained their other interests after entering the hunting market, producing everything from canvas lawn chairs to tricycles. Hettrick was purchased by the F&M Real Estate Company of Lowell, MA and in 1962, Hettrick closed its Ohio factories and moved to Statesville, NC to take advantage of the lower cost of manufacturing in the south. They moved production into the factory of the Empire Manufacturing Corp, who continued producing their own line from the same plant, with a secondary factory in Pink Hill, NC. It is unclear whether they were purchased by Empire, sources are conflicting. Empire ran a strongly anti-union shop, threatening employees in 1968 who were attempting to unionize. They were sued by employees, the threats were found to be unlawful and the case was used as an example in a Congressional subcommittee on labor. Shortly thereafter, in 1969, American Field was acquired by the Olin Corporation, manufacturer of Winchester rifles. In 1970, the Hettrick divistion acquired the J. W. Johnson Co of Bellwood, Ill and Dickey Oakwood Corp of Oakwood, Ohio. In 1971, Hettrick merged with Comfy Seattle Co and became Trailblazer by Winchester, “managing transactions for Comfy, the Turner Co., Olin Skiis, J.W. Johnson, Dickey Oakwood”, as well as factories in Pink Hill, Statesville and one in Corcoran, California built in 1970. While Hettrick as a company was absorbed, the Hettrick brand continued to be produced, with production shifted to the Pink Hill plant, reflected on labels. By the 1980s, the operation had been sold again, to WeatherShield Sports Equipment, Inc. (founded 1951) at Petoskey Rd. At Mercer Blvd., Charlevoix, MI. They lasted at least into the 1990s.

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Hercules Fieldmaster blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401051353688

This vintage coat was made in Canada in the 1950s from English made Early’s Witney Point Blanket material and was sold by Sears under their Hercules Fieldmaster label. It has a Milium lining, which, when combined with the incredibly thick blankets used in this make for one of the warmest vintage coats out there.
Tagged size: 38
Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 36-1/2″

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1940s Hudsons Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272099346046

This vintage coat was made in the 1940s-1950s by the Hudson’s Bay Company from their Hudson’s Bay Point blankets.  This one is made in the rare brown on brown color scheme, with the black and red being more common in that era.  It is double breasted, with a belted waist and a half-lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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Carss Mackinw point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272080581667

This vintage mackinaw coat was made in Orillia, Ontario in the 1920s or 1930s by the Carss Mackinaw company. It is made of striped point blanket material, with four patch pockets and a belted back. It has a squared off shawl collar, and caped shoulders, both distinctively Carss details. The coat is unlined, as is typical of mackinaws of this era.

 

Chest (pit to pit):  22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-3/4″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″
A bit about the company, from a history piece I wrote for “The Fedora Lounge”: Carss Mackinaw made blanket coats in Orillia, Ontario from at least 1897. Their signature model was single breasted with caped shoulders and a squared-off shawl collar. They are most commonly seen in red, green, and khaki, all with a blanket stripe at the base. The fabric used in these coats was advertised as a whopping 44oz (although this one feels lighter), and was sourced from a variety of trade blanket manufacturers, including Hudson’s Bay and the Bird Woolen Mills. They were advertised as “The Only Genuine Mackinaw Made In Canada”. They were sold by the Hudson’s Bay Company, as well as other stores.

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1920s Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271986480282
This vintage coat was made in the mid 1920s from Hudson’s Bay point blanket material. It is made in an early style mackinaw cut, double breasted with cargo pockets (but no handwarmers), and with even button spacing all the way to the top, similar to early peacoats. As is typical for these early cuts, the coat is unlined. It bears a style of label which stopped being used by Hudson’s Bay in the late 1920s. These early blankets are also easily discernible from more modern ones by their heavier weight and deeper nap.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 34″

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