B15D flight jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272381184134

This vintage B-15D flight jacket comes from the Michigan estate of Captain T.J. Baker of the US Air Force. This variant of the B15 has a nylon body and mouton collar.  Made by Rolen Sportswear, this jacket has a Crown zipper on the sleeve pocket and a Talon main zipper, which may be a later replacement.  The shoulder is stenciled with the USAF insignia and there is a leather patch on the breast with Captain Baker’s name and rank.
Tagged size: 42

Chest (pit to pit): 26 (doubled = 52″)

Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24″
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B15 flight jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272381184141

This 1940s vintage jacket comes from the Michigan estate of Captain T.J. Baker of the US Air Force. Though it is missing the tag, the Talon zipper, with its distinctive wide-rib Talon marked stopbox (only used c.1945-c.1948) helps narrow the dating considerably, as does the square cornered slider and the production run for this B-15 variant.  It has a full alpaca pile lining, offset windflap, handwarmer pockets and mouton collar.
Chest (pit to pit): 25-1/2″ (doubled = 51″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24″

 

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More on the Road Ramblers

In about a week and a half, my fiance Alex and I will be leaving on a six month journey, crisscrossing America documenting small towns, through photography, illustration, interviews and the collection of artifacts. Think WPA photography meets Charles Kuralt. We call ourselves the Road Ramblers.
This project has been in the works since last fall. A couple of things in our lives happened all at once. Alex and I had been traveling extensively, picking for my vintage clothing business and for her senior thesis photo series focusing on boom towns in Montana, falling more and more in love with the places we were visiting and exploring. A TV show about vintage Americana I had been slated to host fell through after working through the summer with a production team in New York. My architecture thesis on authenticity took a turn toward examining places with a past vs. homogeneous sprawl. We got to talking about what the next step was- where do these projects go from here?

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And so, in early December, we bought thirdhand shuttlebus and started the process of gutting it out. After months of throwing away our money at secondrate motels every weekend on our trips through the west, we knew if we were going to pull off a trip of the length we were planning, we would need someplace comfortable, someplace that felt like home. We’re both the kind of people who, if we need something done, do it ourselves, so having the blank slate of the bus appealed to us. And starting way back with Further, there’s just something more romantic about a bus conversion than an RV. Now that it’s done, we’re fully capable of living off grid, with solar panels, batteries and an inverter, gas stove, composting toilet, foot pump water and a fancy cooler. We’ve got the work space to handle any and all of our needs while we’re on the road. With the bus finished and both of us recently graduated (Masters in Architecture for me, Bachelors in Photography for Alex), and everything we own either being sold off or put into storage, we’re just about ready to go.
It’s a funny thing tackling America. So many people have done it, from “On the Road” to “Blue Highways”, “Easy Rider” to “Pee Wee’s Big Adventure”. These days, there’s no shortage of people on instagram and the like, traveling full time in their Vanagons. What seems to be missing in these current projects is any sense of purpose or product. These are hipsters, out to find themselves, sponsored by outdoor equipment companies. At least the first generation hippie travelers worked odd jobs or craft fairs along the way. Thankfully, we’ve already found ourselves and our project’s about something bigger.

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This is a time of huge change for small towns. Manufacturing has either left entirely or shifted to larger plants elsewhere. Farming on an industrial scale has changed the way the town itself works. Other towns were bypassed decades ago by interstate highways and are slowly falling by the wayside. Meanwhile, new construction continues to sprawl, leaving with placeless places- strip malls, suburbia and endless chain restaurants. Pop culture idealizes the small town, but in a nostalgic, shallow way. The current trend in photography of “ruin porn” objectifies and exploits post industrial landscapes without addressing any of their content. Despite the transitions so many small towns are going through, these are places near and dear to our hearts. This is the fabric of America, and we try to come at it with an honest eye. Alex is heavily influenced by 1970s vernacular photography- think Stephen Shore, William Eggleston.

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In addition to her photography, I will be doing illustrations as we go (take a look above). As we travel, we will be conducting an interview series (think Storycorps or WPA interviews) as we go, to try to further get our finger on a regional pulse. We’ll be posting these on a youtube channel.
At the end of all this, we plan on taking our writings, photography, illustrations, portraits, quotes, experiences, etc. and compiling it all into a comprehensive photo book. This is where you come in.
All of this is a massive undertaking (but we’ve never been ones to make things easy on ourselves), and the books and web series are going to be hugely labor intensive and costly. We need your help to make these things a reality and to share them back with you. We recently launched a kickstarter to offset some of the costs of the production of the book and online components. Remember, if we don’t make the goal, we get nothing, so anything helps. We’d love to have you as a backer and to be able to bring our explorations directly to your computer.
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/263559793/road-ramblers
Spencer Stewart
And be sure to follow along at
https://www.instagram.com/roadramblers/
http://www.theroadramblers.com/
https://www.facebook.com/theroadramblers/

The Road Ramblers

I’ve been a bit irregular in posting over here as of late and here’s why- we’ve been working on a big, super exciting new project- the Road Ramblers.

Since November, we’ve been planning. We bought an old bus in early December 2015 and have been working on gutting and converting it, readying it for a six month trip around the country, during which we will be documenting small towns through interviews, photography, video, art and the collection of artifacts. All of this will be compiled into a web series and then a book, if you’re able to help. We have exciting premiums in addition to the book- namely original art and photography. We’d appreciate your help and love for you to follow along!
Thanks- Alex and Spencer

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/263559793/road-ramblers

Updates on dinerhunter will be sporadic, probably more confined to the east coast leg of the trip when I’ll be able to return to the original mission of this site- diners.

For regular updates from the road through Road Ramblers, check in at theroadramblers.com, our Instagram, and our facebook.
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On the Road: Vegas part 3

We reached Salt Lake City late but with enough time to hit IKEA to pick up a few things for the interior of the bus. With dire predictions of 1-3 feet of snow around Salt Lake City and sleet and snow already falling when we woke up, we skipped many of our thrift shop stops and prioritized the larger of the antique malls. Back on more familiar, older ground, my luck started to change, with a couple of fedora finds. The vintage shops in the area focused more on women’s vintage (with huge selections) and 1970s menswear, but there were a few pieces of vintage kicking around there and the antique malls. There was the usual frustration of 6-3/4 hats (unsellable) and equally unsellable late 1950s-early ’60s suit jackets and overcoats tempting me in lots of the shops. Dodging the forecasted snow in the SLC area and north in Pocatello, we cut west to Twin Falls for the night. Waing early, we drove the last two hours to Boise, where we stumbled upon Ward Hooper Gallery and Vintage Swank, which specializes in the type of vintage clothes that largely make up my own closet. It’s always fun to walk into a place filled with 50-80 year old clothing and be able to recognize exactly who made what without even take it off the hanger. Alex made a major score there, picking up an early 1900s wooden 8×10 bellows camera, a real monster. We hit up a few more antique stores and a couple of thrift shops before reaching the point of critical thrift saturation. Usually we do more sightseeing, more walking through back alleys looking at changes in brickwork and battered neon. This trip we’ve done much too much driving and going from one chain thrift shop to one chain thrift shop, with identical interiors, the same lousy clothes on every rack from one store to the next and seeing the same sprawl. No matter where you go, driving by an Applebees still looks the same.

So on to Pocatello, to recharge at our favorite hotel, the Black Swan Inn Theme Suites. This time we got the Caveman room and what a kitchy roadside treat it was. Back within our 300 mile zone of comfort, we re-traced the footsteps we’ve taken on several other trips through Pocatello and Idaho Falls. We were last in the area in October, and places haven’t had time to fully re-stock, so we saw a lot of the same antiques we’ve passed over before. Still, a tie here, a jacket there, it adds up.

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When it’s all laid out, it’s quite a haul, coats, hats, ties, suits, jackets, and the big score, over a hundred deadstock WWII zippers, mostly Talons and Crowns. I’ve been working on shooting and editing for the past 10 hours, I should have the rest of it ready to show you all by tomorrow. I’m also working on editing some of the video we shot along the way. There’s a definite learning curve, and this probably wasn’t the trip to start with, but I think you’ll enjoy it.