Peters Bros Shady Oak Bankers Special One Hundred

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271327357768
This vintage hat was custom made by Peters Brothers of Fort Worth, Texas. It is their famed “Shady Oak Banker’s Special” model, in the One Hundred grade, meaning that when it originally retailed for $100, at a time when the average fur felt hat in a comparable style was running about $20. The hat has a seamless welt edge. Cavanagh called their version the Cavanagh Edge. Stetson called theirs the Mode Edge. The hat has a narrow, western style single cord hat band.

Size: 7-5/8″
Brim Width: 2-3/4″
Crown Height: 5-1/2″

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Peters Bros Shady Oak Bankers Special 75

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271327370482
This vintage hat was made in Fort Worth Texas by Peters Bros. It is a “Shady Oak Banker’s Special”, and originally sold for seventy five dollars, making it about three times as expensive as a fur felt Stetson Open Road of the time. It is made from dress weight beaver felt. The hat is a dressy western style, with a short brim with a stitched edge detail and a medium width corded western hatband. At some time, the hat must have had some work done, as it has a liner from Fort Worth’s other noted hatter, Hatter’s Hats.

Size: 7
Brim Width: 2-1/2″
Crown Height: 5-3/8″

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1940s Mexican Export Stetson fedora

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271327386878
This vintage fedora was made in Philadelphia, PA in the mid 1940s by the John B. Stetson company. Interestingly, it was a rare export model, sold in Mexico. As such, it has variants on the early style reorder tags and on the size tag, with the sizes in metric. The hat has a raw edge brim and a self-felt hatband. It is made in a luxurious “suede finish” fur felt. The hat is creased with a teardrop crown. It has the early style detailed Stetson imprints on the sweatband and liner, transitional sweatband construction, and was sold by Salinas y Rocha, Alameda, Mexico

Size: 7
Brim Width: 2-3/4″
Crown Height: 5-1/4″

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1940s Stetson Plastic Felt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271327402640
This vintage Stetson fedora was made in the mid 1940s. It is made of Stetson’s short lived “Plastic Felt”, a wool blend with a portion made of “Vinyon”. The hat originally sold for $5, and was marketed as being water resistant. The hat is made from four pieces of this miracle felt- the crown sides, the crown top, the brim, and the brim binding, all stitched together like a cloth hat. The hat is stitched for extra strength. It is light brown with an orange ribbon, one of the “Autumn Shades” mentioned in the original advertising. It has an unreeded brown leather sweatband, with the Stetson Plastic Felt logo.

Size: 7
Brim Width: 2-1/2″
Crown Height: 4-1/2″

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Stetson Moose River

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271327411225

This hat was made by the John B. Stetson company for LL Bean. It is a variation on the classic “Open Road” model, but with a narrower, raw edge. It looks like the original owner followed the marketing and wore it as a rugged outdoorsy type of fedora. As such, the sweatband needs to be replaced.

Size: 7-1/8
Brim Width: 2-1/2″
Crown Height: 5-1/4″

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1940s Sportsman’s vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271324386244
This vintage fly fishing vest was made in the 1930s or 1940s. It is similar in cut and style to two made by Remington under the DriDux label which I recently sold, but no longer has a tag, so I can’t say for certain. It has a three button front, with two large wraparound cargo pockets. There is a flapped breast pocket. The other side has a felt pad to store flies in. Most have a simple piece of sheepskin, but this one snaps closed for greater storage and protection. The vest has a fly rod loop on one side, and a metal ring to attach gear to on the other.

Also see: https://vintagehaberdashers.com/2013/11/09/rem-dridux/

https://vintagehaberdashers.com/2013/10/26/hunting-and-fishing-jacket/

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Length: 21-1/2″

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1930s Red Head Brand hunting coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281208719396
This vintage canvas hunting coat was made in the mid 1930s by Red Head brand, a premier maker of hunting and outdoorsman’s sportswear at the time. This one has a heavy canvas shell, with a corduroy collar and corduroy lined cuffs. The shoulders are reinforced. With a setup similar to an early 1920s Filson coat, https://vintagehaberdashers.com/2013/10/19/1910s-1920s-filson-canvas-jacket/,¬†This coat has a double breast pocket (a small pocket overtop a larger one, which share the same flap). The hip pockets are double round patch pockets which share the same extra large flap. These pockets are leather reinforced. There is an internal game pocket, accessible from the back, or from the inside. The game pocket opens with an early bell-shaped Talon zipper, which helps date the coat. Buttons are Red Head branded. The coat was originally sold in Detroit by the Tool Shop Company.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 22″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 30″

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1937 Albert Richard Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271323676616
This vintage mackinaw coat was made around 1937 by Albert Richard. It is tailored from English made Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets. When this coat was made, a standard Albert Richard mackinaw coat, made in either solid colors or in plaids, sold for $12.50. An upgrade to this red and black Hudson’s Bay blanket fabric raised the price to a whopping $22.50. Period advertisements identify this model as “The Souix”. As with many belted coats, this one lost the belt years ago. One belt loop was removed, the other partially so. The coat has classic mackinaw styling- double breasted with handwarmer pockets on the chest, and flapped hip pockets. As with most early mackinaws, this coat is unlined, relying on high quality heavy wool blanket material for warmth. I wear this same model mackinaw from about a year earlier as my winter coat, and trust me, it will keep you warm all winter long.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 30″

A bit about Albert Richard, from an article I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”.
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

 

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1946 Albert Richard blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281208760052
This vintage wool jacket was made c. 1946 by Albert Richard. It is interlined with “Spun Sun” fiberglass insulation, pioneered by Albert Richard immediately after WWII. This model coat matches the button front surcoats sold immediately after WWII. This is the early style “Spun Sun” fabric, before the introduction of the (R) symbol in 1947. Albert Richard was sold and relocated in 1952, closing shortly thereafter. This coat has a three button front, a broad collar and two flapped hip pockets. While earlier coats by Albert Richard were made of Hudson’s Bay Company blanket fabric, with the advent of the miracle “Spun Sun” insulation, they could use lighter weight wools from other woolen mills to achieve the same level of warmth. This one has a three stripe pattern, with a broader central stripe.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length: 30″

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Fritz Huckel fedora

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271323757917
This vintage fedora was made in Weilheim, Western Germany by Fritz Huckel Hutmacher, and was sold by the Star Clothing Company, Inc., of Yakima, Washington. It is a fur felt “ultra” velour, with a tall crown and a wide overwelt. It has a nicely detailed back bow. The liner has a fancy stitching detail, and lists all the gold medals won by the hatmaker. It has a brown leather reeded sweatband, with a taped rear seam and fancy decorative ribbon.

Size: 7-1/8
Brim Width: 2-1/2″
Ribbon Width: 1-3/4″
Crown Height: 5-3/4″

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