1917 Hookless Zipper- The first production zipper

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281479010615
This vintage money belt was made in 1917 or early 1918. It is khaki colored canvas, with a three compartment zippered pouch and a waist belt. These were generally advertised to servicemen during WWI, and were one of the earliest applications of the then brand-new Hookless fastener. The zipper on this one is the earliest production model produced by Hookless, produced under patent no. 1219881, applied for in 1914 and granted in 1917. An improved model came out later in 1917, narrowing the dating of this model down significantly. These early sliders were intricate, and were simplified significantly in later versions. The stop at the end of the zip is made from unstamped teeth, unlike later versions, where this was a specialized component. The buckle on the belt was made by Adjusta and was patented in 1912, and on January 27, 1914.

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Simplified Hat Photography

Most of my shots are done professionally in a studio by Michael G. Stewart, but those of you at home can get good looking results with a minimum of cost or effort.
Here’s how.

01: A hat stand of some description is important for photographing your hat while maintaining the shape of its brim. This purpose made one cost $5. The backdrop is a sheet of 18″x24″ paper from an art store.
02: To minimize shadows, shoot outdoors on an overcast day, or at the very least in shadow. Make sure what you’re shooting does not hang over the edge of the white.
03: In photoshop (or GIMP, it’s free), white balance to the lightest point of the white backdrop.
04: Use a brush tool to knock out all the non-white sections of the photo.
05: Select the shadows and white balance that selection separately to eliminate them.
06: Crop.
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Coffee

1940s “Imperial Cap Works” Flat cap. They just don’t make caps like this any more. Not with this shape, this cut, this fabric. Modern caps just don’t cut it in the looks department. But these old ones are a pain to find and to recognize when going through page after page of terrible ebay ads.

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