USN M-69 Aircraft Transport Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401032519472

This vintage coat is a M-69 Aircraft Transport coat, made during WWII for the US Navy by Gordon & Ferguson.  It is made of goatskin, in a double breasted, belted cut, with a mouton collar and full alpaca lining. The leather is in excellent supple condition save for a neat hole in the back of the coat and a single dry, cracking spot where the lapel meets the collar.  Surely this damage on a coat which is in otherwise great shape has a story to tell.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 45-1/2″

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1940s Golden Bear leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400986630457
This vintage jacket was made in the 1940s by S. Slater & Son of San Francisco, under their Golden Bear label. The jacket is made of goatskin, with a full belt, pleated back, yoked front and back, handwarmer pockets concealed inside the front vertical seams, and flapped cargo pockets. It has a talon zipper with a rectangular holed pull and Talon marked “U” stopbox, which put its date of manufacture between about 1944 and 1948.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 27″

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1920s goatskin leggings with Hookless zippers

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271833931339
These vintage leggings were made in the 1920s, and are marked the Improved Standard Drawer Legging style 912, size 6. They are made of brown goatskin, with a side zipper. The zipper is an early production Hookless, produced before the patent numbers on the reverse, which, along with period advertisements for this style, would place the date of manufacture around 1924-1925. The separable bottomed zipper wasn’t invented at this point and wasn’t put into production by Hookless/Talon until early 1930. By that point, the strictly Hookless branded sliders, as found on these, had been phased out, replaced by Talon branded ones of the same shape. These leggings, of course, have the non-separable attached end, located at the calf. These are marked a size 6 and measure 4″ (8″ doubled) at the ankle, 6″ (12″ doubled) at the thigh, and 14-1/2″ long.

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1950s All Weather Garment goatskin bomber jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271820684029
This vintage jacket was made in California in the early 1950s from imported Goat Skin. It was made by All Weather Garment. The jacket is made in a post-war “bomber jacket” style, which takes elements of the A-2 flight jacket and melds them with other pre-war civilian styles to make something new. The jacket has patch pockets with scalloped pocket flaps and angled corners, epaulettes, a shirt style collar, knit cuffs and waistband and a Talon zipper of the style only used in the early 1950s, with the unmarked wide rib stopbox and square hole slider. The jacket has a quilted liner. With a 54″ chest, this would best fit someone who wears a 48-50 long. These early jackets are difficult to find in these larger sizes, especially in such an excellent state of preservation.

Chest (pit to pit): 27″ (doubled = 54″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to end of knit): 27″
Length (base of collar to end of waistband): 26-1/2″

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1940s Kit Karson Indian Scout goatskin leather half-belt cossack jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271685789633
This vintage leather jacket was made in the late 1940s by Kit Karson Indian Scout sportswear. It is made of goatskin, in a half-belt cossack jacket style. The distinctive pleats of the pocket conceal handwarmers with the flapped cargo pockets. The jacket has a pin lock bell shaped Conmar zipper.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 22-1/2″

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1940s half-belt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281472895438
This vintage leather jacket was made in the mid to late 1940s. It is made of goatskin, with a pointy collar, buttoned yokes which form the pockets on the front and a scalloped yoke on the back. It has a half-belt back and an action back. The jacket has patch pockets with scalloped pocket flaps, and belted adjuster cuffs. It is fully lined. The jacket has a Talon zipper with a rectangular hole pull and a Talon marked stopbox. The jacket has distinctive leather buttons and is made of goatskin leather. It bears an Amalgamated Garment Workers union label. The jacket is marked on the leather E5 and the size 36.

Chest (pit to pit): 20-1/2″ (doubled = 41″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28-1/2″

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G-1 Leather Flight Jacket AOPA

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281384893346
This vintage leather jacket is a USN G-1 flight jacket. It has a half-belt, bi-swing back, knit cuffs and waistband, button closure patch pockets with a pencil slot and a button throat latch on the underside of the collar. There is a patch for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association on the chest, attached by pinbacks rather than stitching.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to end of knit): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to end of waistband): 24″

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Mid 1940s Albert Richard leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271352480738
This vintage leather jacket was made by Albert Richard in the mid 1940s. It is made of “Chevro-Kid” goatskin. This trade name was typical of Albert Richards’s naming schemes during WWII and shortly after, playing of military terminology. The company could back this up- they produced flight jackets for the army and navy during the war. This jacket is made of the same goatskin used for these Navy flight jacket contracts. The jacket is a hip length style, with flapped saddlebag patch pockets , a straight yoke on the front, and a plain back. It was originally belted, but as with many jackets of this style, the belt is long since missing. The zipper is a Talon, with a mid 1940s stopbox and a slightly earlier style slider (these combinations were common at this period). The zipper is attached in the “surcoat” style, , where the end of the zip is attached to a triangle of leather which is free from the front of the jacket.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length: 29-1/2″

A bit about Albert Richard, from an article I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”.
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south. Production was low, and this new plant closed almost as soon as it opened.

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1950s Swedish / German Goatskin utility jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271226620665

This vintage leather jacket was sold by Albackens of Malung, Sweden. The design is typical of what was coming out of German shops of this period. It is made of black goatskin, in a classic utility jacket style. It has a zipp zipper. There are a number of teeth missing on the zippers, but it still zips up well. There are buckle adjusters on the sides, and button tabs on the sleeves. The leather has a wonderful patina.

Chest (pit to pit): 19″ (38″ chest)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22″
Length: 23″

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Los Angeles Sportogs leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281051161461

This vintage leather jacket was made in California in the 1940s by Los Angeles Sportogs.  It is a battledress/ Ike jacket influenced style, probably produced just after the war.  It has stitched down epaulettes, a sptread collar and a front belt closure. The front is closed with a short deco sunburst talon zipper.  The front pockets and label are missing, but I have seen one other example of this jacket sell about four years ago, and another example in a Japanese vintage leather book.  I’ve rented this one out, and it has appeared on several album covers, including Deanna Bogart’s “Pianoland” and Merl Johnson’s “Better Man”.Chest: 23″ (doubled =46″)Shoulder to Shoulder: 19″Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″    Photobucket

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