Swedish M1909 sheepskin parka

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272043311909

This vintage coat is an M1909, made by Mats Larsson for the Swedish army.  It is made of heavyweight canvas with a sheepskin lining and collar.  It has canvas tabs for the buttons, large saddlebag pockets with three button closure, and a section of quilted lining at the elbows.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)

Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 38-1/2″

 photo edit m1909.jpg

 photo DSCF1900.jpg

 photo DSCF1901.jpg

 photo DSCF1902.jpg

 photo DSCF1904.jpg

 photo DSCF1905.jpg

 photo DSCF1906.jpg

 photo DSCF1907.jpg

 photo DSCF1908.jpg

Advertisements

WWI army shirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281687615513
This vintage shirt was made for a soldier during WWI. It is made of coarse olive drab wool in a pullover style, with eyelets in the collar and reinforcements at the elbows, running down into the sleeve placket.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (Doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 29″

 photo edit wwi.jpg

 photo DSCF4212.jpg

 photo DSCF4213.jpg

 photo DSCF4214.jpg

 photo DSCF4215.jpg

 photo DSCF4216.jpg

1918 dated WWI army overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281645258225
This vintage overcoat was made in 1918 by Cohen Endel . . . of New York and was distributed by the New York Depot quartermaster. The coat is double breasted, with a belted back and buttoned throat latch. There is a secondary stamp from the New York Depot, stamped Marvin Falk and what looks like 1933. The belt-back is is sewn over the tag and lining, and from its construction, looks like it may have been added later. There is a army air corps patch on the shoulder, obviously added later than WWI, however if the coat was re-issued in the 1930s, it would likely have been added at that point. The As is typical of coats of this period, it is only partially lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″” (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 38″

 photo edit wwi.jpg

 photo DSCF3959.jpg

 photo DSCF3960.jpg

 photo DSCF3962.jpg

 photo DSCF3963.jpg

 photo DSCF3964.jpg

 photo DSCF3966.jpg

 photo DSCF3969.jpg

 photo DSCF3970.jpg

1950s-1960s Mighty Mac Boat Coat peacoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271760788987
This vintage coat is a “Mighty Mac” Boatcoat. It is a peacoat style with a twist. With its navy blue Melton wool body, its handwarmer pockets, patch pockets and button-on hood, it draws from the designs of WWI peacoats, WWII peacoats and British duffel coats to create something which is unique, yet recognizable. These were marketed in the late 1950s through to about 1962 by Mighty Mac to the high school and college aged crowd, and were made in sizes 14 through 20 (ages). This one is the largest size, a young man’s 20, which is equivalent to a men’s 40. It originally sold for $37.95, which is roughly equivalent to $300 in today’s money.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

 photo edit boatcoat.jpg

 photo DSCF1403.jpg

 photo DSCF1404.jpg

 photo DSCF1405.jpg

 photo DSCF1407.jpg

 photo DSCF1408.jpg

 photo DSCF1409.jpg

 photo DSCF1410.jpg

 photo DSCF1412.jpg

 photo The_Bridgeport_Post_Thu__Oct_4__1962_.jpg

1920s Marx Made Cravenette overcoat trench coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271654468359
This vintage coat was made by Marx & Haas in the mid to late 1920s. The Marx-Made logo found on this jacket was introduced in 1921 and was used through to the late 1920s. The jacket is wool gabardine that has been Cravenette Processed to shed showers. The process became a generic at this period for coats that doubled as lightweight overcoats and as raincoats. The “double service – for clear days for storm days” slogan of Crafenette’s was phased out by the late 1920s. The coat is a double breasted trench coat style, introduced c. 1915. It was originally belted, with an extremely high belt. It is unlined save for the sleeves. There are pass-through pockets to access the contents of your suit pockets without unbuttoning the coat. The fabric is stamped with the Cravenette logo

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 43″

 photo IMG_0018-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0019-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0021.jpg

 photo IMG_0014.jpg

 photo IMG_0023.jpg

 photo IMG_0015.jpg

 photo IMG_0016.jpg

1910s The Gem Hunting vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271654532285
This vintage hunting vest was made by the Gem Shirt Company of Dayton, Ohio in the 1910s. The Gem Shirt Co. was founded c.1888, and diversified into canvas hunting clothes in the early part of the 20th century, innovating the usage of lined waterproof game bags. They were a high end maker at the time, making their products from an excellent grade of cotton canvas duck. They ceased production by the 1920s.
This vest is their budget version, with sewn on buttons instead of changable ring-backed ones, and without the side adjusters or buckle back which other models featured.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Length (front): 22″
Length (rear): 19″

For other vests made by the Gem shirt company, see here and here

 photo editthegem1.jpg

 photo IMG_0001.jpg

 photo IMG_0002.jpg

 photo IMG_0003.jpg

 photo IMG_0005.jpg

 photo IMG_0006.jpg

1917 Hookless Zipper- The first production zipper

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281479010615
This vintage money belt was made in 1917 or early 1918. It is khaki colored canvas, with a three compartment zippered pouch and a waist belt. These were generally advertised to servicemen during WWI, and were one of the earliest applications of the then brand-new Hookless fastener. The zipper on this one is the earliest production model produced by Hookless, produced under patent no. 1219881, applied for in 1914 and granted in 1917. An improved model came out later in 1917, narrowing the dating of this model down significantly. These early sliders were intricate, and were simplified significantly in later versions. The stop at the end of the zip is made from unstamped teeth, unlike later versions, where this was a specialized component. The buckle on the belt was made by Adjusta and was patented in 1912, and on January 27, 1914.

 photo IMG_0003-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0013-2.jpg

 photo 1917patent.png

 photo IMG_0008-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0007-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0066-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0067-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0064-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0065-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0068-1.jpg