1930s Jeweled Studded western belt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271900729809
This vintage belt was made c.1938 and was sold by Sears under the “Cowhand Special” model name. This type of jeweled, studded western belt was popular between about 1933 and 1941, with narrower styles and styles with overlaid contrast leather reviving it in the late 1940s-mid 1950s. This early variant was equally popular with cowboys as it was with the collegiate crowd, and you frequently see these worn in period photos with wide waistband collegiate slacks. This style of belt buckle was used on these belts from 1937-1939.

Belt Width: 1-3/4″
Smallest hole: 26″
Largest Hole: 33″

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1930s Albert Richard Grizzly jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281655706660

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This vintage jacket was made in Milwaukee, Wisconsin by Fried Ostermann between 1936 and 1938 under the Albert Richard Sportswear label. The jacket is made of front quarter horsehide leather, with mouton panels and collar. Originally sold as a “Laskinlamb jacket”, this style has come to be known by collectors as the Grizzly. These were popular in the mid to late 1930. The jacket has Albert Richard’s patented Tu-Length cuffs, which have buttons on either side, allowing them to be worn down for a longer sleeve or turned up and buttoned for a shorter sleeve length. The jacket has a Talon main zipper with a grommet style stopbox. The slider is of the deco sunburst design with oval slider-to-puller connection, which was only produced in the mid 1930s and which was replaced by a simpler design around 1938. The pull is a rectangular holed, plain backed version, also typical of mid 1930s production. The jacket is lined with plaid wool, with leather pit guards and ventilation grommets. The sleeves have knit storm cuffs to keep out the wind. The collar has a buttoned chinstrap throat latch to cinch it up tight in bad weather.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff, turned down): 26″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff, turned up): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 21-1/2″

A history of Albert Richard which I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”:
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI.
Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company.
Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes.
850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

1930s Woolrich 255 plaid coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281399908235
This vintage jacket was made in the mid to late 1930s by the Woolrich Woolen Mills of Woolrich, PA. This is the rare 255 model, with caped shoulders, handwarmers with D-pocket stitching and flapped cargo pockets. It has exposed buttons and a rear game pouch. The coat, in keeping with many early mackinaw coats, is unlined.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 29″

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1930s Red Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281399895994
This vintage coat was made c. 1937 from Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets. The coat is a classic late 1930s double breasted mackinaw cut, with flapped patch cargo pockets and slash handwarmers with arrow reinforcement stitching. The back has a scalloped yoke and pleated back. The cuffs have buttoned adjusters. Inside are two different styles of Hudson’s Bay label, which help with the dating.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

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1930s Californian grommet zipper leather vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281350515618
This vintage leather vest was made by the California Sportswear Company of Los Angeles under their Californian label in the mid to late 1930s. It has an early Talon Hookless style grommet zipper and a chain and ring style Talon zip on the breast pocket, with the early style slider with the Talon script. These date it from around 1935-1938. It bears the famous Californian rising sun label, and has side adjuster belts, like those found on Californian’s half-belt leather jackets of the same period.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Length: 17-3/4″

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1930s capeskin half-belt cossack jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271469478475
This vintage leather jacket was made around 1936. It is made of lightweight capeskin leather, with a perforated Ostrich grain texture, popular briefly in 1936 and 1937. The jacket is an early cossack style, with a leather waistband and D-stitched pockets. The back is belted, with side adjusters, and is pleated. Cuffs are adjustable with two buttons. The jacket has an early Talon riveted “grommet” zipper, a style which started production in 1930, and continued through the 1930s. This one is missing its original slider, though at this date of manufacturer, it probably had a Talon branded fantail style slider. The jacket has a transitional half-lining. While it is constructed like the unlined leather jackets of the early 1930s, it is lined in the shoulders and sleeves. The lining remains, but it has shredded at most of the points where it attaches to the leather itself.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem):22″

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Photos from 1936 and 1937 Sears catalog, showing similar Sears Hercules ostrich grained models.  Jacket is similar to models in advertisements, though differs in back pleat detailing.

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Mid 1930s Hyde Park overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281263922267
This vintage overcoat was made by Hyde Park Clothes sometime between 1936 and 1938, and was sold by one of the Zions Cooperative Mercantile Institution (ZCMI) Stores. The coat is made of brown plaid wool. It is double breasted, with wonderful brown buttons. It has raglan shoulders, and a plain back. The coat is half lined, and has great design on the labels. It bears a 1936 ACWofA union label, which nails down the date.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Center of collar to cuff (due to raglan shoulders): 34-1/2″ (comparable to about a 25″ sleeve with regular shoulders)
Length (base of collar to hem): 47″

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Mid 1930s half-belt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271391483127
This vintage leather jacket was made in the mid 1930, probably in Wisconsin judging by the materials and construction. It is an early half-belt / cossack style. It can be dated to this point both by style and by hardware. By style: In the late 1920s and early 1930s, a full leather waistband was prevalent. The fancy belted back started to gain traction in the mid 1930s, but the front still retained the bottom panels found on this jacket. By the end of the 1930s, most makers had abandoned these panels for a cleaner look. Stylistically this dates from that middle period. By hardware: The full length separable zipper was first found on jackets made 1930. The “sunburst” deco Talon stopbox found on this jacket joined the riveted style stopbox around the midpoint of the decade, eventually supplanting it in Talon’s product line, before disappearing itself in the early 1940s. So that narrows the date down between about 1935 and 1942. The snaps are made by United Carr. These are of a style which I have not seen on anything beyond the mid 1930s, with the spring section of the fastener appearing on the male side of the snap.
This jacket has been worn extremely hard. The cuffs and collar have been worn through, and a hole has been worn through on the side. That was repaired what looks like some decades ago, but the repair has worn out as well. The lining is missing, and the zipper is missing both the slider and the bottom couple inches of the teeth and tape on the male side. There is paint on the skirt beneath the belt.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 26″

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1937 Albert Richard Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271323676616
This vintage mackinaw coat was made around 1937 by Albert Richard. It is tailored from English made Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets. When this coat was made, a standard Albert Richard mackinaw coat, made in either solid colors or in plaids, sold for $12.50. An upgrade to this red and black Hudson’s Bay blanket fabric raised the price to a whopping $22.50. Period advertisements identify this model as “The Souix”. As with many belted coats, this one lost the belt years ago. One belt loop was removed, the other partially so. The coat has classic mackinaw styling- double breasted with handwarmer pockets on the chest, and flapped hip pockets. As with most early mackinaws, this coat is unlined, relying on high quality heavy wool blanket material for warmth. I wear this same model mackinaw from about a year earlier as my winter coat, and trust me, it will keep you warm all winter long.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 30″

A bit about Albert Richard, from an article I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”.
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

 

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1930s cossack ski jacket

SOLD
This vintage jacket was made in the mid to late 1930s. The jacket has a waist length cut, a throat latch tab collar (chinstrap), two flapped patch pockets, a belted back, and button adjuster tabs on the sleeves. The pockets and collar are trimmed with contrast green wool, which, in combination with the style of the back, makes me think this was a ski jacket. The basic style, without the contrast trim, was used throughout the 1930s as a workwear jacket style, made both in wool, as found on this example, and in leather. Regardless of the material, the style was known as a cossack jacket. This jacket has a triple marked 1930s Talon zipper with a deco-sunburst stop box. This style zipper was introduced c.1936 as the “style 101” and was sold alongside the grommet zipper “the style 102”, until it replaced it in the lineup. In the earlier years of manufacture, this style was advertised as being available in “Rainbow Colors”, but colored examples are rare. Here we have one in green, with a green tape and green hardware. The throat latch detail on this jacket was common in the early-mid 1930s, gradually losing favor as the decade wore on.

Tagged size: 46
Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 23-1/2″

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