1940s Canadian sweater

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272137459625

This was sold to me as being early 1930s, hand knit in British Columbia for a First Nations wedding. ¬†With the style of Lightning zipper stopbox it has, I don’t think I quite buy that provenance, but I will say it is an early one for the zip front cardigan style that would come to be so iconic in Canadian culture, most likely dating from the late 1940s.

Chest (pit to pit): 16-1/2″ (doubled = 33″)

Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 18″
Length (base of collar to hem): 22″
 

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Fringed Suede jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400989009964
This vintage jacket was made in the USA by Lariat from suede leather. It is fringed, laced and beaded with a three button front and handwarmer pockets.

Tagged size: Medium
Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 27-1/2″

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1930s Joseph Cohen Vanity Clothes overcoat with swastika lining

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281549191497
This vintage overcoat was made in the mid 1930s by Joseph H. Cohen & Sons of 71 5th Avenue, New York City, under their “Vanity Clothes” label. The coat is double breasted, with a 4×6 button stance and breast pocket. It has razor sharp peak lapels and a plain back. The coat is half lined in blue and black swastika / whirling logs silk brocade. This type of Native American / Indian pattern was popular pre-war. The lining at the bottom has a larger version of the pattern than the upper panels. The original owner’s name, G.S. Norton, is written on a tag underneath the lining. The breast pocket has a handkerchief with an American Eagle embroidered, “mother”,

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 47″

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Blue Chimayo vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271679975768
This vintage vest was made in New Mexico from Chimayo indian blanket / rug fabric. It was tailored and sold by Pioneer wear. the vest has a denim back with a western style yoke and is fully lined. There are stitch marks from what appears to have been a larger label behind the Pioneer Wear one,. Unlike many of these square bottomed Chimayo vests, this one has buttonholes instead of loops.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Length: 24-1/4″

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Red 1950s-1960s Skookum hunting cruiser jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281506991776
This vintage jacket was made in the late 1950s-1960s by the Centralia Knitting Mills of Centralia Washington for Harold Kaufman under the Skookum Sportswear label. It is made of heavy red mackinaw fabric in a four pocket, caped pattern, with front snaps. Due to the heavy weight of the material, the coat is unlined.

Chest (pit to pit): 27″ (doubled = 54″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 22″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

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1930s Western Costume Company Hollywood fringed buckskin pants

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271654599844
These vintage buckskin pants were made in the 1930s, or possibly earlier. They were used by the Western Costume Company of Hollywood California in western movies starting in the 1930s. They are made of buckskin leather, rough side out, with fronge running the length of the outseam. They have one pocket, on the right seam, have a button fly and belt loops. There is a stain on the right leg and on the pocket bag. The main tag has them marked as a size 32×32, but they have been taken in and shortened over the decades, as these were used in countless movies. The main tag has number 38-23_5-2. If the illegible number is a 4, that number, 2345 was the production number for 1936’s The Last of the Mohicans, starring Randolph Scott, in which he wore an identical looking pair of buckskin pants, and in which other characters wore many fringed buckskin costume pieces.

Waist (side to side): 15″ (doubled = 30″)
Outseam: 36″
Inseam: 25″
Rise: 11″

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1930s Nite Hawks MC Detroit kidney belt

This vintage black leather kidney belt was made in the 1930s and was personalized by a member of the early motorcycle club, the Nite Hawks. This, along with the original owner’s 1930s Schott jacket (which I do not have) came out of a Baltimore, Maryland estate, although it appears that the Nite Hawks Motorcycle Club was based out of Detroit. It has wonderful round, flat, riveted studwork, and a three buckle fastening. the bottom belt has two studs.
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Monarch horsehide barnstormer leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271493775559
This vintage jacket was made by Monarch Mfg. of Milwaukee WI in the late 1930s or early 1940s. It is a belted, double breasted style. This has since come to be known among collectors as a barnstormer style, named after the aviators of the 1920s who wore similar styles. The jacket is made of russet horsehide, with a 3×6 double breasted front. There are handwarmer pockets (known originally as “muff” pockets), as well as flapped cargo pockets. These have deeply scalloped pocket flaps. The jacket is lined with blanket wool in the body, with quilted shoulders and sleeves. The U shaped seam between the two lining materials is a detail I have only seen on other Monarch jackets. The label is of a style used in the 1930s through about the end of WWII. The leather has some really incredible grain, highlighted by decades of usage. The treatment of the seams is unusual. Whereas most jackets, leather or otherwise, will have a seam at the edge of the jacket, or on the edge of the lapels, this one minimizes them by folding the leather around to form the front and back panel.

The Monarch Manufacturing Company was founded in 1892 by Paul Asch. In 1917, they relocated to a new factory, located at 246 East Chicago St., Milwaukee, WI. They built at least four more factories in Milwaukee, employing over a thousand workers by 1922. Throughout the life of the company, they specialized in leather, sheepskin and fabric outerwear for men and boys. They produced A-2 contracts during WWII.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length (collar seam to hem): 30″

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1937 Albert Richard Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271323676616
This vintage mackinaw coat was made around 1937 by Albert Richard. It is tailored from English made Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets. When this coat was made, a standard Albert Richard mackinaw coat, made in either solid colors or in plaids, sold for $12.50. An upgrade to this red and black Hudson’s Bay blanket fabric raised the price to a whopping $22.50. Period advertisements identify this model as “The Souix”. As with many belted coats, this one lost the belt years ago. One belt loop was removed, the other partially so. The coat has classic mackinaw styling- double breasted with handwarmer pockets on the chest, and flapped hip pockets. As with most early mackinaws, this coat is unlined, relying on high quality heavy wool blanket material for warmth. I wear this same model mackinaw from about a year earlier as my winter coat, and trust me, it will keep you warm all winter long.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 30″

A bit about Albert Richard, from an article I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”.
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

 

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Pendleton Vest no. 3

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271246693633
This vintage vest was made by Pendleton woolen mills of Portland, Oregon, out of one of their famous blankets. The tag reads ” High Grade Westernwear”. It has a black background with shades of green, red, purple and brown. The buttons are southwestern sunbeam patterned. It seems to run a bit small from the 38 size tag, please refer to the measurements provided.

Chest (pit to pit): 18-1/2″
Length: 20-1/2″

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