1920s plaid Big Indian Shirt workshirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271352508597
This vintage plaid wool workshirt was made by the Big Indian Shirt company. This is their early yellow and black label with tipis, which was used in the 1920s through the early 1930s. There are two breast pockets. The left one is cut to hold a pen. The collar has a nice shape, with a dramatic undercurve. The tails have gussets.

While most plaid shirts like this were made by outdoors companies like Woolrich, Big Indian was exclusively a workwear company, producing primarily in chambray. Their popularity peaked in the mid 1920s.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length: 28″
Neck: 15″

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WWI army shirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281231419370
This is a WWI army issue pullover wool shirt. It has two breast pockets, one with stitching for a pen. The sleeves have reinforcements at the shoulders. The original tag is still at the hem, but it is mostly illegible. The chest and placket are partially lined. There are gussets at the tails.

Chest (pit to pit): 24-1/2″ (doubled = 49″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length: 32-1/2″
Neck: 16″

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Town and Country Sheeplined Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281230598392
This vintage sheeplined coat was made in the 1930s under the Guiterman Bros. “Town and Country” label. The coat is made of green canvas, with a brown mouton shawl collar. As was common with coats of this style, it has loops instead of buttonholes. Usually these loops are made of corded material, but this one has higher quality leather loops. There are slash handwarmer pockets on the chest and flapped cargo pockets on the hips. The corners of the pockets have leather reinforcements. The coat is lined to the hip with sheepskin, and the sleeves have blanket linings and wool storm cuffs. The coat is belted.

A bit on the company’s history, from a piece I wrote for The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets / The Fedora Lounge: Guiterman Brothers was founded in 1883 and incorporated in 1904. They began using the Summit “Town & Country” name in 1904. In the early 1910s, Guiterman Brothers pioneered the attached soft collared shirt. They also called it the Summit. The company had a plant at 352 Silbey Street, St. Paul, MN, which still stands. They enjoyed prosperity during the 1910s, riding the Mackinaw boom of 1915. They were supposedly the first company to coin the name “windbreaker”. As shown above, their “Town and Country” Coats and vests shared the distinctive double snap Knit-Nek. During WWI, Guiterman Bros. produced flying coats for US aviators. In 1928-1929, the company was purchased by Gordon and Ferguson and continued production.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length: 39″

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More from this company:

Carwood denim jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281230576313
This vintage denim jacket was made by the Carwood Mfg Co. of Winder, Georgia, under their western “Bar C” label. It has a classic cowboy cut. It has a pleated front, open topped patch pockets mid-chest and a snap closure. The jacket carries over a vestige of the belt backs of 1930s and earlier denim jackets in the form of bar tacked pleats where the belt would have been. The jacket has copper dome rivets at the corners of the breast pockets and on the sleeves. The jacket is lined with a striped wool blanket for a bit of extra insulation. Other Carwood jackets of this era I’ve seen were made with selvedge denim, but the lining hides the location the selvedge usually was on this pattern.

Carwood was founded in 1923 and had a manufacturing plant located at 105 E Athens St., Winder, GA. They produced work clothes, twills and denims. They also produced under the “Demander” label. During the 1950s, they had endorsement deals with Rodeo stars for their “Bar C” line of western denims. The company closed in 1989 and the building is now home to the Winder Cultural Arts Center.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 22″

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Sears Oakbrook D-Pocket leather motorcycle jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271351691584

This vintage leather jacket was made in the 1960s by Sears under the Oakbrook Sportswear tag. This style was around for a while, with very little change made other than the label and zippers. 1950s models made under the Sears Fieldmaster label. It is made of black steerhide. It has a large D-Pocket (also known as a pistol pocket), with a smaller cigarette pocket. The other side has a zippered handwarmer. The lapels have exposed snaps, while the collar has concealed ones. The sleeves zip with Serval zippers, while the main is a large gauge Talon. There is a zipper on the collar, presumably for a zip-on mouton collar. The front of the jacket has an attached belt. It has a yoked back, bi-swing shoulders, and spotwork on the kidney panel. Pocket flaps are lined with black corduroy. The coat has a quilted red lining, with black corduroy trim on the pockets and the hem.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length: 23-1/2″

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Canadian D-Pocket Motorcycle Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271351711041
This vintage leather jacket was made in Canada. It’s hard to say whether this was made by Brimaco or by Shields/Score Sportswear, as their patterns were so similar, and this one is missing the labels. Both manufacturers jackets were made as copies of the 1940s “Cycle Champ” jacket sold by Harley Davidson. While Harley retired the model, going with more of a Perfecto style, these Canadian manufacturers continued production with very little changes. It has a large patch D-pocket, with a smaller patch cigarette pocket. The other side of the jacket has a flapped square patch pocket. The ends of the pocket openings are all reinforced with domed bar studwork for that early motorcycle jacket flash. The back design, with kidney panel is more typical for the Score/Shields jackets, while Brimaco/British Cycle Leathers/British Sportswear jackets generally had three panels in a V shape. But you do see both designs coming from both makers, so it’s doesn’t clear it up that much. This has the smooth nylon lining more commonly seen on the cafe racers made by these companies, while the more old-fashioned plaid linings were generally put into the D-Pocket models. The main zip is a Lightning, the pocket zip is a Canadian Talon of the same design (same company).

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Waist: 29″ (doubled = 36″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length: 22″

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For reference, also see:

WWI pullover chinstrap army shirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281230818394
This vintage wool shirt was made by the Metropolitan Shirt Company during WWI. This was a private purchase item, deviating from the standard pattern slightly. It is a pullover style, with an extended collar stand chinstrap. It has tail gussets. There are two small flapped breast pockets. The placket and the collar stand are cotton lined. These shirts were commonly worn after the end of the war in the 1920s as workshirts.

Chest: 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22-1/2″
Length: 30″
Collar: 14″

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