Carwood denim jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281230576313
This vintage denim jacket was made by the Carwood Mfg Co. of Winder, Georgia, under their western “Bar C” label. It has a classic cowboy cut. It has a pleated front, open topped patch pockets mid-chest and a snap closure. The jacket carries over a vestige of the belt backs of 1930s and earlier denim jackets in the form of bar tacked pleats where the belt would have been. The jacket has copper dome rivets at the corners of the breast pockets and on the sleeves. The jacket is lined with a striped wool blanket for a bit of extra insulation. Other Carwood jackets of this era I’ve seen were made with selvedge denim, but the lining hides the location the selvedge usually was on this pattern.

Carwood was founded in 1923 and had a manufacturing plant located at 105 E Athens St., Winder, GA. They produced work clothes, twills and denims. They also produced under the “Demander” label. During the 1950s, they had endorsement deals with Rodeo stars for their “Bar C” line of western denims. The company closed in 1989 and the building is now home to the Winder Cultural Arts Center.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 22″

 photo IMG_0001.jpg

 photo IMG_0002.jpg

 photo IMG_0003.jpg

 photo IMG_0004.jpg

 photo IMG_0006.jpg

 photo IMG_0007.jpg

 photo IMG_0011.jpg

 photo IMG_0016.jpg

 photo IMG_0017.jpg

 photo IMG_0018.jpg

 photo IMG_0009.jpg

 photo IMG_0021.jpg

 photo IMG_0025.jpg

 photo IMG_0026.jpg

Sears Oakbrook D-Pocket leather motorcycle jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271351691584

This vintage leather jacket was made in the 1960s by Sears under the Oakbrook Sportswear tag. This style was around for a while, with very little change made other than the label and zippers. 1950s models made under the Sears Fieldmaster label. It is made of black steerhide. It has a large D-Pocket (also known as a pistol pocket), with a smaller cigarette pocket. The other side has a zippered handwarmer. The lapels have exposed snaps, while the collar has concealed ones. The sleeves zip with Serval zippers, while the main is a large gauge Talon. There is a zipper on the collar, presumably for a zip-on mouton collar. The front of the jacket has an attached belt. It has a yoked back, bi-swing shoulders, and spotwork on the kidney panel. Pocket flaps are lined with black corduroy. The coat has a quilted red lining, with black corduroy trim on the pockets and the hem.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length: 23-1/2″

 photo IMG_0037.jpg

 photo IMG_0048.jpg

 photo IMG_0038.jpg

 photo IMG_0039.jpg

 photo IMG_0041.jpg

 photo IMG_0042.jpg

 photo IMG_0043.jpg

 photo IMG_0044.jpg

 photo IMG_0049.jpg

 photo IMG_0047.jpg

 photo IMG_0050.jpg

Canadian D-Pocket Motorcycle Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271351711041
This vintage leather jacket was made in Canada. It’s hard to say whether this was made by Brimaco or by Shields/Score Sportswear, as their patterns were so similar, and this one is missing the labels. Both manufacturers jackets were made as copies of the 1940s “Cycle Champ” jacket sold by Harley Davidson. While Harley retired the model, going with more of a Perfecto style, these Canadian manufacturers continued production with very little changes. It has a large patch D-pocket, with a smaller patch cigarette pocket. The other side of the jacket has a flapped square patch pocket. The ends of the pocket openings are all reinforced with domed bar studwork for that early motorcycle jacket flash. The back design, with kidney panel is more typical for the Score/Shields jackets, while Brimaco/British Cycle Leathers/British Sportswear jackets generally had three panels in a V shape. But you do see both designs coming from both makers, so it’s doesn’t clear it up that much. This has the smooth nylon lining more commonly seen on the cafe racers made by these companies, while the more old-fashioned plaid linings were generally put into the D-Pocket models. The main zip is a Lightning, the pocket zip is a Canadian Talon of the same design (same company).

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Waist: 29″ (doubled = 36″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length: 22″

 photo IMG_0051.jpg

 photo IMG_0060.jpg

 photo IMG_0052.jpg

 photo IMG_0053.jpg

 photo IMG_0054.jpg

 photo IMG_0055.jpg

 photo IMG_0057.jpg

 photo IMG_0058.jpg

 photo IMG_0059.jpg

For reference, also see:

WWI pullover chinstrap army shirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281230818394
This vintage wool shirt was made by the Metropolitan Shirt Company during WWI. This was a private purchase item, deviating from the standard pattern slightly. It is a pullover style, with an extended collar stand chinstrap. It has tail gussets. There are two small flapped breast pockets. The placket and the collar stand are cotton lined. These shirts were commonly worn after the end of the war in the 1920s as workshirts.

Chest: 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22-1/2″
Length: 30″
Collar: 14″

 photo IMG_0062.jpg

 photo IMG_0076.jpg

 photo IMG_0063.jpg

 photo IMG_0068.jpg

 photo IMG_0073.jpg

 photo IMG_0074.jpg

 photo IMG_0075.jpg

1920s Patrick Duluth red mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271349036566
This vintage coat was made in the late 1920s through early 1930s by the F.A. Patrick woolen mills of Duluth, Minnesota. It is made of red and black point blanket material. While nearly identical in weight, feel and point design to the point blankets made by the Hudson’s Bay Company, the material in this coat was made in-house in one of Patrick’s woolen mills. Patrick was renowned for their high quality blankets and woolen fabric. The coat has classic double breasted styling, with a button-on belt. As was typical on mackinaws of the 1910s-1930s, the coat is unlined, relying on the quality and weight of the wool for insulation. Patrick did an excellent job with marketing- their coats were the official uniforms of the White Sox, the NY Giants, the Chicago Cubs, the Duluth Eskimos (Later the Washington Redskins) among others. This is the same model, though in a different point blanket color combination, as worn by the Eskimos in the late 1920s.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length: 36″

A bit about the company, from a history piece I wrote for “The Fedora Lounge”
: The F.A. Patrick Company, proprietors of the Patrick-Duluth Woolen Mills of Duluth, Minnesota were responsible for taking the Mackinaw coat out of lumber camps of western Canada and introducing them to students, workmen and athletes across the United States. Early on, the Patrick Company were jobbers, making dry goods, primarily for clients in the Northwest of the United States in Canada. In 1901, Patrick began buying fabric from a Scandinavian mackinaw cloth factory in Fosston, Minnesota. In 1906, seeing potential, Patrick bought that factory and began making their own Mackinaw cloth, eventually becoming one of its leading producers. The fabric and the coats made from it were popular with miners, fur trappers, lumberjacks and hunters.

In 1912, Patrick launched a new, refined mackinaw design. It was double breasted, belted and sported a collar described in the ads of the period as a “nansen” collar. Though the term also existed then, we now refer to this style as a shawl collar. The coat was 35″ long and was available in 24 and 32 oz wool mackinaw cloth, in a wide variety of colors. Salesman Harry Harrington began to pitch the Patrick Mackinaw to clothiers in college towns. “It was not long after that that mackinaws became a fad with students generally, and as the college student invariably sets the styles for young men’s clothing, it quickly spread over the whole country”. The early mackinaw trend was marketed in a similar way to the current workwear trend, trading on the rugged associations of the workers for whom the garment was originally designed. The mackinaw fad boomed, and shortly, a number of other manufacturers sprung onto the scene, producing mackinaws of varying quality from a variety of cloths. Large quantities of Patrick mackinaws were sold through such high end stores as Brooks Brothers, Rogers Peet, Wannamaker, Abercrombie and Fitch, Brokaw Brothers, and A. Raymond.
It is around this 1912-1913 period where the name “Mackinaw” begins to be more associated with the short, double breasted, shawl collar style, and less with the mackinaw cloth material from which it was made. The fad lasted about a year and a half. Patrick could not keep up with the growing demand caused by the collegiate fad, and the inferior fabric quality of some competitors led to the downfall of this first-wave craze.

Seeing the end of the craze, Patrick-Duluth re-branded its mackinaw once again, refining its pattern and marketing it to farmers, children, hunters and outdoorsmen, workers, and sportsmen. Its durability, warmth, low price compared to comparable overcoats or sheeplined coats, made it an easy sell to these markets. Alongside sheeplined canvas coats, Patrick Mackinaws became the de-facto winter coat of railroad employees. To further expand the market, patterns were made for men and women, boys and girls. Patrick intensified their national advertising, placing ads in the Saturday Evening Post, Country Gentleman, Farm Journal, Woman’s World, American Boy, Youth’s Companion, Boy’s Life, and many more. The name of the product was shortened from “Patrick-Duluth Woolen Mill Mackinaw” to simply “Patrick”, in a bid to make their brand name the generic trade name on the market, thereby foiling the business of competitors. Their slogan “Bigger than Weather” was penned by Elbert Hubbard. Ads were illustrated by Peter Newell and Clare Briggs. In the years between 1911 and 1914, Patrick had quadrupled its production, expanding from their two story mill to a six story mill on Duluth habror, a garment factory in Duluth, and knitting and spinning mills in Mankato, MN.

 photo IMG_7494.jpg

 photo IMG_7495.jpg

 photo IMG_7496.jpg

 photo IMG_7497.jpg

 photo IMG_7498.jpg

 photo IMG_7499.jpg

 photo IMG_7500.jpg

 photo IMG_7501.jpg

 photo IMG_7502.jpg

 photo 1917.jpeg

Carter & Churchill

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281228705281

This vintage coat was made in the 1920s by the Carter & Churchill Company of Lebanon, NH. The point blanket fabric was the most expensive option for this style of coat at the time, offering the greatest durability and warmth. The coat has a classic early mackinaw cut, with unlined construction, handwarmer pockets high on the chest, and flapped hip pockets. The coat has a buttoned belt (later ones generally had ones with buckles). The points of the blanket are thick and proudly on display. While the company which made this coat survived in various forms for decades, they stopped using this particular tag in the early 1930s.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/4″
Length: 32-1/2″

A bit about the company, from a piece I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”: Carter and Churchill was founded in 1869 by William S. Carter, after leaving his uncle’s company, H.W. Carter & Sons. He was joined by Frank C. Churchill (former salesman for HW Carter), who would come to be the company’s treasurer. The company was headquartered in Lebanon, New Hampshire, with a plant at 15 Parkhurst Street. Starting in 1880, they produced clothing under the “Profile” label, named after the (former) New Hampshire rock formation, the Old Man of the Mountain. They registered that trademark in 1916. Early on, they were also producers of Lebanon Overalls, work shirts, mackinaws and coats. As the decades wore on, they dropped product lines to specialize in their ski clothing lines, which they continued producing into the 1990s, under the “Profile” name.

 

 

 photo IMG_7511.jpg

 photo IMG_7512.jpg

 photo IMG_7513.jpg

 photo IMG_7514.jpg

 photo IMG_7517-Copy.jpg

 photo Ski.jpeg

 photo 193801Stitch.jpg

1960s rockabilly blanket shirt jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271349058704
This vintage shirt jacket was probably made in the 1960s. The influence of Hudson’s Bay point blanket coats is clear, with the classic red color scheme with black stripe. The cut is taken from a pullover shirt style of the 1950s, with two buttons at the neck. This one was probably made from a pattern for such a shirt, but made of striped material. It’s not wool, some kind of fleecy synthetic, but with its napped surface, it looks the part.

Chest (pit to pit): 27″
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length: 28″

 photo IMG_7480.jpg

 photo IMG_7481.jpg

 photo IMG_7482.jpg

Jeffrey Banks / Lakeland shawl collar mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281228720082
This vintage coat was made by Lakeland in the late 1970s as a reproduction of a 1930s shawl collar mackinaw. Having compared it to originals in my collection, the detailing is very close. While the vibrant red color may seem like a modern twist on the design, it was one offered in the 1910s and 1920s by early companies producing this style, like F.A. Patrick, Duluth. The coat is double breasted, with a shawl collar, a buttoned belt, and large flapped patch pockets. It has a center vent, and has a warm quilted lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length: 32-1/2″

 

 photo IMG_7532.jpg

 photo IMG_7533.jpg

 photo IMG_7534.jpg

 photo IMG_7535.jpg

 photo IMG_7537.jpg

Lee TWA / Pratt & Whitney work jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271349078220
This vintage work jacket was made by Lee, better known for its denim jackets and jeans. The jacket is a waist length style, and bears patches for Pratt & Whitney and for TWA (Trans World Airlines). It still has its original zip in quilted liner. The main zipper is a brass Talon. It has bi-swing shoulder, reinforced elbows, slash handwarmer pockets and adjuster tabs on the waistband.

Chest (pit to pit): 24-1/2″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length: 24″

 photo IMG_7455.jpg

 photo IMG_7456.jpg

 photo IMG_7457.jpg

 photo IMG_7458.jpg

 photo IMG_7459.jpg

 photo IMG_7460.jpg

 photo IMG_7461.jpg

 photo IMG_7462.jpg

 photo IMG_7463.jpg

 photo IMG_7464.jpg