Greyhound bus driver’s jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401057515065

This vintage jacket was made by Howard Uniforms of Baltimore, MD for a Greyhound bus driver. It has a zip front and Greyhound buttons and patches.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Waist: 19-1/2″ (Doubled = 39″)
Shoulder to shoulder:  18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/4″
Length (Base of collar to hem):24-1/4″

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1940s USPHS bridge coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400987876601
This vintage bridge coat was made in the 1940s, during WWII for a director of the USPHS. It was made by SSS clothes and bears a 1939 union label. Unlike most bridge coats with their anchor buttons, this one has special medical buttons for its organisation, with a crossed anchor and Caduceus. There are four braids on the sleeve, which for the Navy would indicate a rank of Captain, and for the US Public Health Service denote a rank of Director.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″

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Chainstitched Emerson uniform jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400940808481
This vintage jacket was made in the 1930s or 1940s, and was a uniform of some sort. Usher? Carhop? Gas station attendant?

Chest (pit to pit): 20″
Shoulder to shoulder: 16-3/4″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 21″
Waist (side to side): 15-1/2″ (doubled = 31″)

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Forest Service Stratton Campaign Hat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281693447638
This hat was made by Stratton for the US Forest Service. It is made from Stratton’s heavyweight fur felt. Originally, it was flanged similar to a fedora, rather than the flat brim of Army or Park Service campaign hats, and had a center dent. It has been re-creased, and the brim has been re-shaped through wear. It is a 7-3/8.

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1918 dated WWI army overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281645258225
This vintage overcoat was made in 1918 by Cohen Endel . . . of New York and was distributed by the New York Depot quartermaster. The coat is double breasted, with a belted back and buttoned throat latch. There is a secondary stamp from the New York Depot, stamped Marvin Falk and what looks like 1933. The belt-back is is sewn over the tag and lining, and from its construction, looks like it may have been added later. There is a army air corps patch on the shoulder, obviously added later than WWI, however if the coat was re-issued in the 1930s, it would likely have been added at that point. The As is typical of coats of this period, it is only partially lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″” (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 38″

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King-O-Wear workwear jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271737229397
This vintage work jacket was made by King-O-Wear. It is a waist length style, made in black wool, with buckle adjuster sides, handwarmer pockets, a zipper front and grommet reinforcements for a badge. This style goes back to the 1930s, but this example was likely produced in the 1960s. As is consistent with earlier production examples of this style, the jacket is unlined. The 1949 union label and the Talon zipper on this helps to date this one. While the pull on the zipper goes back to the 1930s on luggage, its usage on jackets did not start until later. The stop-box is of the type which started use in the late 1950s. The union label is a half-scale variant which I have only seen used by King-O-Wear.

Tagged size: 48
Chest (pit to pit): 25-1/2″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 25″

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1930s Meier railroad uniform jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271722213465
This vintage jacket was made between 1936 and 1938 by A.G. Meier & Co. They were located at 205 W Monroe St, Chicago, IL and produced uniforms and caps. This jacket was produced for a railroad employee, and is single breasted, with a four button front. It has stitching at the cuffs and no breast pocket. The jacket has four spacious interior pockets, all made from heavy sailcloth. There is evidence of railroad insignia at the collar and on the cuffs. At some point, the jacket was converted to be worn as streetwear and the original brass ring-back buttons were changed out for sewn-on plastic ones.

Chest (pit to pit): 20-3/8″ (doubled = 40-3/4″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29-1/2″

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1920s / 1930s Olympic Cap

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271397653107
This vintage cap was made by Knox hats in the late 1920s or early 1930s as part of the uniform of the United States Olympic team. It’s difficult to say with 100% certainty, but this looks consistent with what was worn at either the 1928 St. Moritz or the 1932 Lake Placid games. It is made from white felt in a traditional flat-cap style, with an embroidered US Olympic shield crest consistent with the early games. The cap has a cream colored leather sweatband of the type typical of the late 1920s and early 1930s. The deep embossing is also typical of what Knox was producing in this era. The style of brim is something I have never seen before. Usually the brim on these flat caps is a separate piece, usually with a snap on the top. This is interfaced inside for a degree of stiffness, then decoratively stitched, presumably so that the cap can be rolled up and stowed easily. There is a remnant of the original size tag, but not enough to tell the size. The sweatband measures 22″ in circumference.

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