1940s horsehide reinforced wool work jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401022051961
This vintage work jacket was made immediately after WWII. It is made of mackinaw wool, with leather cuff, sleeve and pocket details, typical of work jackets designed for railroad workers. The jacket has a Crown zip, knit waistband and is unlined.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 15-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff):25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 25-1/2″

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1930s Shawl Collar railroad mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281560066554
This vintage coat is a 1930s railroad mackinaw. It is double breasted, with a shawl collar, belted back, handwarmer pockets and cargo pockets. Because this is a workwear coat, subject to abuse, this style had additional leather reinforcement at the pockets, sleeve bottom and cuffs. As was typical of these early production mackinaw coats, this one is unlined, with taped seams. While the shawl collar mackinaw style goes back to the 1910s, the leather reinforced railroad version didn’t gain popularity until the 1920s. By the early 1940s, production was waning, though old coats of this style continued to be be worn for years, a testament to their durability and warmth.

Chest (pit to pit): 26-1/2″ (doubled = 53″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 22-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 36″

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1930s Meier railroad uniform jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271722213465
This vintage jacket was made between 1936 and 1938 by A.G. Meier & Co. They were located at 205 W Monroe St, Chicago, IL and produced uniforms and caps. This jacket was produced for a railroad employee, and is single breasted, with a four button front. It has stitching at the cuffs and no breast pocket. The jacket has four spacious interior pockets, all made from heavy sailcloth. There is evidence of railroad insignia at the collar and on the cuffs. At some point, the jacket was converted to be worn as streetwear and the original brass ring-back buttons were changed out for sewn-on plastic ones.

Chest (pit to pit): 20-3/8″ (doubled = 40-3/4″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29-1/2″

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c.1940 Woolrich railroad vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281349001502

This vintage vest was made in Woolrich, Pennsylvania by the Woolrich Woolen Mills. Woolrich changed their label design frequently, which makes them easy to date if you know what you’re looking for. This variant on the label was used from about 1940-1945. The design of the United Carr snaps are also a giveaway for this vest’s date of manufacture. In the 1930s, Woolrich used snaps with one of two variations on a greek key pattern. During WWII, they switched to a plain topped design, featured on this vest. Starting in the late 1940s, Woolrich switched to snaps bearing the Woolrich name, before switching back to a different variation on the plain topped snaps in the 1960s. The design of the back of the snap further confirms this dating.

The vest is made of Woolrich’s signature mackinaw wool. The vest has a snap front, and bound seams. Although some examples you see are the sleeved variation with the sleeves removed, the construction on those is different. The vest has a belt adjuster back and asymmetric top and bottom patch pockets. Comparisons to Brown’s Beach Jacket vests of the same period are inevitable. This vest has a single large interior pocket.

Woolrich still makes a version of this model, however, the snaps have given way to a zipper, the cut has been lengthened, the armholes lowered, the shape of the front and rear changed, the wool fabric is now a blend, the pockets are a different shape, the construction is different and the taped seams altered. There is really no comparison the the original.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″
Length (back) 20-1/2″
Length (front): 23-1/2″

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Reproduction Shawl Collar Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281141046168
This coat is a recent reproduction of a style of Mackinaw coat which was popular from the early 1910s through to the 1930s. This style of coat started out with lumberjacks in the pacific northwest at the turn of the century. It broke into mainstream fashion starting around 1912, and was quickly adopted by the collegiate crowd. Workmen and railroad men quickly saw the practicality of its collar and short length and adopted the style.

This reproduction is made of heavyweight black herringbone knit cotton, with a fleeced backing. Like many originals, it is unlined, but the fleeced interior of the fabric makes for a very comfortable jacket. It has a broad shawl collar, and four flapped patch pockets. It is single breasted. There are button adjusters at the wrists.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length: 29″

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