Steele Brothers fur coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401060678356

This vintage coat was made in the early part of the century by Steele Brothers of Gloversville, New York. Made from black fur which I have been told is Buffalo hide, it is double breasted, with a toggle front, shawl collar and handwarmer pockets.  It has a quilted lining, ticking sleeves and storm cuffs.

Pit to pit: 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 51″

 photo edit steele.jpg

 photo DSCF4138.jpg

 photo DSCF4139_2.jpg

 photo DSCF4141.jpg

 photo DSCF4142.jpg

 photo DSCF4143.jpg

1960s Roth-Shire suit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272109403111

This vintage suit was made in the 1960s by the House of Roth-Shire, New York.  It has fish-mouth peak lapels.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)

Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″
Waist (side to side): 17-1/2″ (doubled = 35″)
Outseam: 42″
Inseam: 30-1/2″
Rise: 11-1/2″

 photo edit rothshire.jpg

 photo DSCF3914.jpg

 photo DSCF3916.jpg

 photo DSCF3919.jpg

 photo DSCF3915.jpg

 photo DSCF3917.jpg

 photo DSCF3918.jpg

 photo DSCF3920.jpg

1950s Michael Stern suit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401057412818

This vintage suit was made by Michaels- Stern of Rochester, NY from Courier Cloth and was sold the Hub Clothing Co of Moorhead, Minnesota. Courier Cloth was advertised as being woven from mid-weight wool in such a way that made it particularly hard wearing.

Chest (pit to pit): 23-1/2″ (doubled = 47″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 29″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32-1/2″
Waist (side to side): 18″ (doubled = 36″)
Outseam: 45-1/2″
Inseam: 33″
Rise: 11-1/2″

 photo edit hub.jpg

 photo DSCF3972.jpg

 photo DSCF3973.jpg

 photo DSCF3974.jpg

 photo DSCF3975.jpg

 photo DSCF3976.jpg

 photo DSCF3978.jpg

 photo DSCF3979.jpg

 photo DSCF3980.jpg

 photo DSCF3981.jpg

 photo DSCF3982.jpg

 photo DSCF3977.jpg

1950s F.R. Tripler fedora

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401054242502

This vintage fedora was made in the 1950s and was sold by F.R. Tripler & Co of Madison Avenue, New York City. It is light brown fur felt, with a wide black ribbon with square bow knot. The crown is nice and straight for this era, and the hat has a very lighweight felt. The brim measures 1-7/8″ and the crown measures 5-1/8″.

 photo edit tripler.jpg

 photo DSCF3390.jpg

 photo DSCF3391.jpg

 photo DSCF3392.jpg

 photo DSCF3393.jpg

 photo DSCF3394.jpg

 photo DSCF3395.jpg

 photo DSCF3396.jpg

Schott Half-belt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272084671032

This jacket was made by Schott Bros. of New York under their Rancher label. It is made of heavy steerhide leather, with a no. 10 Ideal zipper front, handwarmer pockets, flapped cargo pockets and a half-belt back.  It has bi-swing shoulders and a plaid lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17-3/4″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/4″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 26-1/2″

 photo edit schott.jpg

 photo DSCF2821.jpg

 photo DSCF2822.jpg

 photo DSCF2827.jpg

 photo DSCF2826.jpg

 photo DSCF2825.jpg

 photo DSCF2824.jpg

 photo DSCF2828.jpg

 photo DSCF2829.jpg

The History of DryBak

[​IMG]

Drybak was a manufacturer of hunting clothing located in Binghamton, New York with factory at 168 Water street and later 67 Frederick Street. Early articles put their founding in 1904, while later advertising claims 1900.

From a 1950 newspaper article on Drybak, largely quoting a 1930 article on the company’s early years
The, “origin of the company dates back to the turn of the century when the Dimmick-Sheldon firm moved here from Newark, NJ. The company made footballs, hunting clothing, uniforms and similar products. It was combined with a local concern, Clark & Turner Co., that made flags, tents, awnings and leggings. The reorganized Sheldon Co. shortly went into bankruptcy and Lewis M. Weed of the old James B. Weed Co. took over its assets. The name of the firm was changed to Lewis M. Weed Co. [Henry] Munger and the late Herman A. Speh bought the firm in 1922. In 1930, Haskell & Davids, Binghamton pants manufacturers and Drybak were merged.

Drybak was given its present name in 1926 in order to capitalize on the company’s trade slogan, Dry Back or Money Back.”
The firm operated in three buildings on Water Street before it was move to its present location in 1936, at which time it employed 200 workers. The Frederick Street factory, one of the most modern clothing plants in the East, was built by Dunn and McCarthy, Inc., shoe manufacturers, in 1929. The firm sold the plant to Drybak in a move to consolidate its operations at its Charlotte Street Plant.”

Labels, 1910s-1920s
[​IMG]

In 1950, Henry Munger, who bought the firm in 1922, retired and sold his controlling shares in the company to women’s clothing company M.C. Schrank of Bridgeton, New Jersey. In late 1952, Drybak acquired noted outerwear brand, Albert Richard and shifted their manufacture previous owner Fried Ostermann’s factory in Milwaukee to one of M.C. Schrank’s factories in New Jersey with plans to eventually move production to Drybak’s factory in Binghamton. Labels were changed during that period to read, “Albert Richard by Drybak”.

Labels, 1930s-1950s. Label on the right is the most common
[​IMG]

In a bid to lower costs, Drybak sold their Binghamton factory in 1954 to the Link Aviation Co., discontinued all operations in New York, and closed a secondary factory in Susquehanna, Pennsylvania. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN and relocated their manufacturing to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

By 1965, Drybak had been acquired by the Brunswick Corporation of bowling alley fame and production had moved to existing Brunswick factories in Eminence, Kentucky and Chicago, Illinois. Around the same time, Brunswick had also acquired one of the other notable hunting garment companies, Red Head Brand. Production of Drybak goods continued for several years, but the brand appears to have been dropped around 1967-1968 so as not to compete with Red Head.

Labels, 1960s
[​IMG]