LL Bean hunting jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401043363268

This vintage hunting jacket was made for L.L. Bean Inc. of Freeport, Maine.  It is made of canvas with a corduroy collar, Talon zip breast pocket and handwarmer and cargo pockets. The buttons have been swapped out by a previous owner for USN buttons.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 27-1/2″

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1920s Thompson Mfg. Co denim chore jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272035139888
This vintage denim chore coat was made by the Thompson Manufacturing Company, which was located at 56 Church Street, Belfast, Maine. They produced overalls and “working clothes” from a 7,980 square foot, 3 story factory, built in 1909, and did not survive the depression, with the business closing c. early 1930s. The jacket is made from selvedge denim with a four button (including the collar) front and three pockets. The donut-hole buttons bear the maker’s name,

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff):
Length (base of collar to hem:28-1/2″

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1930s LL Bean hunting coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401009346777
This vintage hunting coat was made in the 1930s and was sold by L.L. Bean Inc. of Freeport, Maine. It bears their early style yellow and black label. The style is very similar to early Woolrich coats, but opts for buttons on the pockets instead of their snaps.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

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1940s Palm Beach Goodall Springweave jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271865336045
This vintage jacket was made by Goodall, creators of the famed Palm Beach Cloth from their Springweave fabric. Springweave was introduced in early 1944. Goodall changed their name and label to Goodall Sanford in late 1944, so this is a rare and precisely date-able piece of vintage. This was from the early formulation of Springweave fabric, which consisted of lightweight wool and mohair. It has a nice herringbone weave to the fabric, a two button cut, and patch pockets. The jacket was sold by the Stix, Baer and Fuller men’s store.

Size: 38
Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 30-1/2″

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1940s Sawyer Barker Pine Tree shirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271446932617

This vintage shirt was made by the Sawyer Barker Co. of Portland, Maine, makers of Pine Tree Brand garments.  They were known for their workwear and their cone denim overalls. They had a factory at 120-126 Center Street. The “Made in Maine for over 50 years” dates this shirt to the 1940s. Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (42″)
Tagged size: 16″
Collar: 15-1/2″
Shoulder to shoulder: 16-1/2″
Sleeve (Shoulder to cuff): 22″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28-1/2″

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1930s Brewster Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281303524987
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in Camden, Maine by the J.A. Brewster company. The company was founded in the 19th century by Jarvis Adelbert Brewster. The company produced high quality outerwear for the harsh Maine winters, with locations in Camden and Freeport Maine. The LL Bean flagship store would later be built at the site of Brewster’s Freeport location. Brewster produced the first run of red wool outdoorsman’s shirts for the Boy Scouts in the 1940s.

This coat was made in the late 1930s. The style is pure function, with an oversized collar to block out harsh winter winds. A throat latch / chinstrap makes sure it stays snug when up. The coat is double breasted, with handwarmer pockets on the chest and patch pockets on the hips. As was the style up through the 1930s, this coat is unlined. To make up for the lack of lining and still retain warmth, these early coats were made of super thick wool. After WWII, when lighter weight coats began to be more popular, quilted linings made up for the lower quality of the shell. This one has some of the thickest wool I’ve seen on this type of coat. The tag position is consistent with the dating- later coats by this maker generally had the tag on the inside by the collar.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (collar to hem): 30″

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1930s J.A. Brewster red mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281262534629
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in Camden, Maine by the J.A. Brewster company. The company was founded in the 19th century by Jarvis Adelbert Brewster. The company produced high quality outerwear for the harsh Maine winters, with locations in Camden and Freeport Maine. The LL Bean flagship store would later be built at the site of Brewster’s Freeport location. Brewster produced the first run of red wool outdoorsman’s shirts for the Boy Scouts in the 1940s. This coat was made in the late 1930s. The style is pure function, with an oversized collar to block out harsh winter winds. A throat latch / chinstrap makes sure it stays snug when up. The coat is single breasted, with handwarmer pockets on the chest and patch pockets on the hips. As was the style up through the 1930s, this coat is unlined. To make up for the lack of lining and still retain warmth, these early coats were made of super thick wool. After WWII, when lighter weight coats began to be more popular, quilted linings made up for the lower quality of the shell. This one has some of the thickest wool I’ve seen on this type of coat. The tag position is consistent with the dating- later coats by this maker generally had the tag on the inside by the collar.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (collar to hem): 30″

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Stetson Moose River

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271327411225

This hat was made by the John B. Stetson company for LL Bean. It is a variation on the classic “Open Road” model, but with a narrower, raw edge. It looks like the original owner followed the marketing and wore it as a rugged outdoorsy type of fedora. As such, the sweatband needs to be replaced.

Size: 7-1/8
Brim Width: 2-1/2″
Crown Height: 5-1/4″

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LL Bean Boots – a Review

I bought this pair of Bean boots almost four years ago, trying to find a way of combating the winter in Halifax, Nova Scotia. For those of you who haven’t been to Halifax in the winter- it’s a big slushy mess. It snows one day, rains the next and freezes the day after that. It’s a constant cycle of slush, ice, sand and salt. It will soak you to the bone and ruin all but the hardiest footwear. As a student in Halifax, without a car, I walked, a lot. So poorly fitting rubber boots just weren’t going to cut it. I needed something warm, waterproof and comfortable.

These Bean boots fit the bill. These have a goretex and thinsulate lining and they’ve kept me plenty warm and dry. The rubber has kept the salt from destroying anything and the leather uppers ensure a good, comfy fit.

I’ve run the heels and soles down, so it’s about time for them to go back to Maine for a rebuild. Some of the stitching is wearing as well, but since Bean will resole them for a “reasonable cost”, I would think four years in their life is just beginning.

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