REI anorak

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401065413365

This rain jacket was made by REI, probably in the 1980s-early 1990s.  It has a nylon shell and lining with Gore-tex waterproofing.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Sleeve (center of collar to cuff): 34″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29-1/2″

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1920s Marx Made Cravenette overcoat trench coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271654468359
This vintage coat was made by Marx & Haas in the mid to late 1920s. The Marx-Made logo found on this jacket was introduced in 1921 and was used through to the late 1920s. The jacket is wool gabardine that has been Cravenette Processed to shed showers. The process became a generic at this period for coats that doubled as lightweight overcoats and as raincoats. The “double service – for clear days for storm days” slogan of Crafenette’s was phased out by the late 1920s. The coat is a double breasted trench coat style, introduced c. 1915. It was originally belted, with an extremely high belt. It is unlined save for the sleeves. There are pass-through pockets to access the contents of your suit pockets without unbuttoning the coat. The fabric is stamped with the Cravenette logo

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 43″

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1930s Black Bear Rain-Tite canvas suit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271435185224
This vintage suit was made in the 1930s in Seattle, Washington by high end workwear and outdoor-garment manufacturer Black Bear Brand as part of their “Rain-Tite” water repellent clothes range. Black Bear Brand produced work shirts, pants, overalls, jackets and mackinaws from their plant on Rainier Ave. S. This suit is made from army duck canvas, the jacket from 10oz duck and the pants from 8 oz duck. It appears they both started out life a medium brown canvas, but years of wear and layers of waterproofing have darkened it. Both are extremely heavy duty, and are physically heavy and stiff, both from the material and from the wax proofing. The back of the jacket is two layers of the 10 oz canvas through the body, with three layers on the shoulders. The sleeves are two layers. It is constructed with overlapping capes and layers to keep everything dry in harsh weather. The pants are two layers as well. They are cut to be worn with tall boots. They have suspender buttons and belt loops. There is a crotch gusset, and a patch watch pocket inside the side pocket.

In the pocket of the pants, I found the package of a trolling spoon and an Elks matchbook advertising war bonds. This suit probably hasn’t been worn in a good 70 years or so if those are still in-tact in the pocket. The snaps are all branded “Union Made” as are all the buttons. There are union tags from the United Garment Workers of America inside the jacket and inside the flap of the back pocket of the pants. The waterproofing is still good- water beads up and falls right off. This type of suit was frequently worn by lumbermen in the North West. The heavy wear supports this. Going by the matchbook, the original owner of this one was probably from Vancouver.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder (under cape): 22″
Sleeve (Shoulder to cuff): 20″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28-1/2″

Waist: 17″ (doubled = 34″)
Inseam: 25″
Outseam: 38″
Rise: 13″

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A similar suit in the 1920s in Alaska.  Photo from my collection  photo 102.jpg