1960s Vaughn three piece tweed suit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272109443105

This vintage suit was made in the 1960s, sometime around 1962-1965 by Vaughn At Sather-Gate, who had locations in Seattle, San Jose and Berkeley.  The suit is made from gray herringbone tweed wool, in a classic 1960s preppy sack coat cut.  It has a four pocket, six button vest.

Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/4″ (doubled = 44-1/2″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-5/8″
Length (base of collar to hem) 31-1/2″
Chest (pit to pit): 20-3/4″ (doubled = 41-1/2″)
Length (back): 20-1/2″
Waist (side to side): 15-1/2″ (doubled = 31″)
Outseam: 45″
Inseam: 33″
Rise: 12″

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J.Press flannel blazer

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272064557878

This vintage jacket was made in the late 1950s by J. Press.  It’s classic preppy fare, navy flannel with metal buttons and a half lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29-1/2″

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White Canvas Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400989114643
This vintage jacket was made in the 1930s by the Independent Towel Supply Company of Cleveland, Ohio. It is their style 630, made of white canvas, with a three button front, square cutaway and three patch pockets. The breast pocket is unusually shallow. This style of jacket was worn both institutionally as workwear and became popular on east coast university campuses as part of the 1930s “beer suit”.

Chest (pit to pit): 20-1/2″ (doubled = 41″)
Shoulder to shoulder:16-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 26-3/4″

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Cambridge Dry Goods barn jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271172287868

This jacket was made by Cambridge Dry Goods. It is an interesting mix of preppy styles, taking the basic form of a classic canvas barn jacket, with its six pocket front, and mixing it with the contrast taped seams of boating blazers and school uniforms. The underside of the collar, the pockets and the lining are all tartan.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 22″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″

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Alberg red blazer with black velvet collar

Now on eBay!
This vintage jacket was made in the late ’50s or early 1960s by Alberg of Montreal.  It is a bright red flannel blazer with a black velvet collar.  Very much a hunt inspired blazer.  It has a short rear vent, one button on each sleeve, and no breast pocket.  There is some slight staining to the front of the jacket, which could probably be taken care of with a dry cleaning.  The jacket is half-lined in dark red.
Chest: 22″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 32″
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LL Bean Boots – a Review

I bought this pair of Bean boots almost four years ago, trying to find a way of combating the winter in Halifax, Nova Scotia. For those of you who haven’t been to Halifax in the winter- it’s a big slushy mess. It snows one day, rains the next and freezes the day after that. It’s a constant cycle of slush, ice, sand and salt. It will soak you to the bone and ruin all but the hardiest footwear. As a student in Halifax, without a car, I walked, a lot. So poorly fitting rubber boots just weren’t going to cut it. I needed something warm, waterproof and comfortable.

These Bean boots fit the bill. These have a goretex and thinsulate lining and they’ve kept me plenty warm and dry. The rubber has kept the salt from destroying anything and the leather uppers ensure a good, comfy fit.

I’ve run the heels and soles down, so it’s about time for them to go back to Maine for a rebuild. Some of the stitching is wearing as well, but since Bean will resole them for a “reasonable cost”, I would think four years in their life is just beginning.

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