German rubber raincoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272123081955

This vintage raincoat is made from heavy rubberized canvas, with a wool collar.  It has raglan shoulders, a typically European buttoned tab closure rather than a more traditional fully buttoned front, epaulettes and a large D pocket map pocket. There is a tag reading  “36”, but with an extra large 52″ chest, this would best fit around a US 46.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)

Sleeve (center of collar to cuff): 36″
Length (base of collar to hem): 51″

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1930s Lacrosse rubber overshoes

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281666464191
These vintage boots were made by LaCrosse in the mid-late 1930s. They are rubber overshoes, with rare pin-lock no-hole fan shaped talon zippers.

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1930s black rubber raincoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271654485422
This vintage raincoat was made in the 1930s, and from the specifics, was likely sold by Sears. It is made from black rubber, with a cord trimmed collar, back yoke and hook and eye closure. It is single breasted, with flapped pockets, a rear vent and rivets at all points of stress.

Chest (pit to pit): 23-1/2″
shoulder to shoulder: 20″
sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 48″

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Deadstock 1940s/1950s swimsuits

Medium http://www.ebay.com/itm/281321108323

Large http://www.ebay.com/itm/281321112134

This vintage swimsuit was made in the early to mid 1950s. It is a brief style, with an elastic waistband and zipper coin/key pocket. The zipper was made by Savoy. The un- belted brief men’s bathing suit came into style around 1948 and remained popular through until about 1958. The 1940s models generally had flapped pockets, whereas by the later 1950s, most had lost the pocket altogether. These stylistic changes help with the dating. The suit is deadstock, that is, it was never sold originally and has never been worn. It still has the creases from having been folded for the last sixty years or so.

Tag Size: Medium
Waist (unstretched): 11″ (doubled = 22″)
Waist (stretched): 16″ (doubled = 32″)
Side Seam: 7-1/2″
Rise: 13-1/2″

Tag Size: Large
Waist (unstretched): 12″ (doubled = 24″)
Waist (stretched): 17″ (doubled = 34″)
Side Seam: 7-1/2″
Rise: 14″

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Elasti-Glass

It looks like these clear vinyl products started being marketed in 1939. They made Elasti-Glass belts, suspenders, sock garters, neckties, watch straps, wallet inserts, pipe humidors, raincoats, and rain chaps.
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LL Bean Boots – a Review

I bought this pair of Bean boots almost four years ago, trying to find a way of combating the winter in Halifax, Nova Scotia. For those of you who haven’t been to Halifax in the winter- it’s a big slushy mess. It snows one day, rains the next and freezes the day after that. It’s a constant cycle of slush, ice, sand and salt. It will soak you to the bone and ruin all but the hardiest footwear. As a student in Halifax, without a car, I walked, a lot. So poorly fitting rubber boots just weren’t going to cut it. I needed something warm, waterproof and comfortable.

These Bean boots fit the bill. These have a goretex and thinsulate lining and they’ve kept me plenty warm and dry. The rubber has kept the salt from destroying anything and the leather uppers ensure a good, comfy fit.

I’ve run the heels and soles down, so it’s about time for them to go back to Maine for a rebuild. Some of the stitching is wearing as well, but since Bean will resole them for a “reasonable cost”, I would think four years in their life is just beginning.

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