1950s Buco J-24 horsehide leather motorcycle jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271935645735
This vintage jacket was made in the early 1950s in Detroit, Michigan by the Joseph Buegeleisen Company (Buco) out of horsehide. It is their J-24 D-Pocket model motorcycle jacket. From the style of stop box on the main zipper, with its wide ribs, but without the Talon name, this one was made between about 1952 and 1957. The jacket has a D-pocket map pocket with a rounded cornered cigarette pocket. It has zipped sleeves, snapped lapels, snapped belt loops for an external belt, bars on the epaulettes, zippered side storage, a handwarmer pocket, and bi-swing shoulders. At some point, it appears the original owner either broke the main zipper or gained weight, and added snaps, which are offset from the original zip position.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 23-1/2″

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1940s Grais Sportswear leather half-belt jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400938380661
This vintage leather jacket was made by by Grais – Sportswear with Grace in the 1940s. It has a half-belt, pleated back, a surcoat length cut, a tunneled, elasiticized belt with a single button closure, a blacked out Talon of mid-late 1940s manufacture, and ring pull chain zippers on the dual breast pockets. The cargo pockets are flapped and there are buttons on the cuffs.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 27-1/2″

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1930s Albert Richard Grizzly jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281655706660

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This vintage jacket was made in Milwaukee, Wisconsin by Fried Ostermann between 1936 and 1938 under the Albert Richard Sportswear label. The jacket is made of front quarter horsehide leather, with mouton panels and collar. Originally sold as a “Laskinlamb jacket”, this style has come to be known by collectors as the Grizzly. These were popular in the mid to late 1930. The jacket has Albert Richard’s patented Tu-Length cuffs, which have buttons on either side, allowing them to be worn down for a longer sleeve or turned up and buttoned for a shorter sleeve length. The jacket has a Talon main zipper with a grommet style stopbox. The slider is of the deco sunburst design with oval slider-to-puller connection, which was only produced in the mid 1930s and which was replaced by a simpler design around 1938. The pull is a rectangular holed, plain backed version, also typical of mid 1930s production. The jacket is lined with plaid wool, with leather pit guards and ventilation grommets. The sleeves have knit storm cuffs to keep out the wind. The collar has a buttoned chinstrap throat latch to cinch it up tight in bad weather.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff, turned down): 26″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff, turned up): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 21-1/2″

A history of Albert Richard which I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”:
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI.
Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company.
Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes.
850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

1940s Civilian Air Associates B-2 leather flight jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281645136149
This vintage jacket was made in Kansas City, Missouri, as a civilian version of the US army B-2 Flight jacket, issued in the early 1930s, and replaced by the B-3 in 1934. The army version was made of horsehide, with a single breast pocket, attached belt zippered cuffs on the inside of the wrist, and a full alpaca lining and mouton collar. This jacket was produced with a civilian label and a few alterations to the pattern. This jacket is made from capeskin, and with handwarmer pockets instead the large breast patch pocket that was universally removed from the army production version. This jacket has an off-center Talon main zipper, with bell-shaped slider and unmarked diagonal-stripe sunburst stopbox. The sleeves have zipper cuffs, with early pattern United Carr snaps and bell shaped talon zippers. The jacket has heavy wear, and the label has been partially worn away. The remaining text reads “aviation” and “Kansas City Mo”. There is a remnant of what looks to be a wing logo. The size tag is of the black and yellow design used on military jackets, and the pocket linings are the distinctive shade of twill used in the linings of A-2 jackets. These details point to this jacket having been made as part of a specialized civilian aviator’s line by a manufacturer which held a military jacket contract.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 22″

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Japanese reproduction 1930s Joe McCoy horsehide halfbelt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281632536165
This jacket was made in Japan by high-end vintage repro company, Real McCoys under the Joe McCoy & Co. Leather Clothing Sportswear label. Though made in Japan, for authenticity to original 1930s jackets, the label reads, “styled and tailored in Buffalo, NY”. The plaid lined pocketbag bears the union label of the now defunct United Garment Workers of America. It is made from black front quarter horsehide. The jacket is a 1930s cossack style, with a pleated, belted back, bi-swing shoulders, d-ring side adjuster belts, deco buttons, a Talon zipper with deco stopbox, pin-lock slider and reinforcement grommets, and a Talon marked ball zipper on the breast pocket. Although the tape, teeth and slider are all in excellent condition, the slider won’t currently engage the teeth. The jacket has a burgundy lining. This jacket, though a few seasons old, is very close to McCoy’s current “Steinbeck” model, which retails for 194,000 yen, roughly equivalent to $1600 USD.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 21″

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1920s Shawl Collar horsehide leather barnstormer jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271790736078
This vintage leather coat was made in the 1920s-early 1930s. It is made of black horsehide leather, worn to reveal brown tones and incredible grain. It has a broad brown mouton shawl collar. The coat is single breasted, with handwarmer pockets and flapped hip pockets. The coat has an original wool lining, with nylon on the back and sleeves, probably to replace a worn lining. There are storm cuffs under the buttoned cuffs to keep the wind out. These hip length shawl collar coats were popular in the early days of motorcycling and aviation.

Chest (pit to pit) 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 22″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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Famous D-Pocket motorcycle jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281606876377
This vintage jacket was made in Canada by “Famous”. It is strongly reminiscent of the also Canadian-produced Brimaco D-Pocket motorcycle jacket, which was in turn inspired by the Design of Harley Davidson’s “Cycle Champ” D-Pocket. So although this one was produced in the 1960s, the design and detailing go back to the 1940s. The jacket has a map pocket with sub cigarette pocket, mirrored by a larger patch pocket on the other side of the asymmetrical zipper. The jacket has zipped cuffs with 1930s-1940s style cuff detailing. It has a plaid lining, and a Canadian produced (left tracked) Acme zipper.

Chest (pit to pit):24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 22″

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Georgetown Leather Design half-belt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271771686941
This vintage leather jacket was made by Georgetown Leather Design. This was made in the late 1960s in the early days of Georgetown Leather Design, a high-end DC area leather company, before they opened their other area locations in the early 1970s and changed their label. The jacket is made in a half-belt cossack style, popular from about 1935 to the late 1950s. By the 1960s, most manufacturers producing this silhouette had changed the dimensions and detailing, however this one plays it completely straight, and other than the label and quilted lining, it could easily pass for one made nearly 30 years prior. It is made in heavy leather, probably steerhide, with a wonderful patina. The main zip is a brass Talon, as is the pocket zipper. The jacket has scaloped cuffs, a belted back, bi-swing shoulders, and a short, trim cut.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Waist: 19″ (doubled = 38″)
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff):21-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 23-3/8″

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1940s Symax Shawl Collar barnstormer jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271760774818
This vintage coat was made in the late 1940s by the Symax Garment Company of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It is made in a double breasted, belted, shawl collared style. It has a gray collar, a black leather body with handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets and a full belt. While this style had fallen out of favor in the United States by the early 1940s, it retained some popularity north in Canada through into the early 1950s. It can be distinguished from earlier manufactured models by its quilted lining, which replaced the sheepskin and corduroy liners which were more popular pre-war.

Chest (pit to pit): 27″ (doubled = 54″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 35″

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Levis Vintage Clothing HomeRun Moleskin Worker Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281574492886
This jacket was made by Levis Vintage Clothing as part of their Fall / Winter 2014 “Metropolis” lineup. The official model description is the Levi’s Vintage Homerun Moleskin worker jacket. The tag reads, ” HomeRun Double-Tex Suedette “.
Though the line is described as reproductions of clothes made “circa 1940”, this style of shawl collar, button front jacket was popular from about 1928-1933. These days, it is often referred to as an A-1 style by collectors because of the button front. While it shares a common stylistic ancestor with that knit collared model, the two are divergent lines. When originally produced, these were referred to as Cossack Jackets. That name was later applied to the belt-backed leather jackets of the mid 1930s onward. Through other current productions of the style, it has also become known as the “Menlo” or the “Heron” after specific model names. The Home-Run label was originally used by Levi Strauss from the mid 1920s through to about 1940 for a line of children’s and teenager’s clothing. Levi’s Vintage Clothing resurrected the label design for the some of 1930s workwear reproductions in this Metropolis line. It is a very nice reproduction of the style, made in a durable moleskin cotton. The jacket has a seven button front, with small flapped pockets. It has a shawl collar, and triangular side panels with belt adjusters. The belt’s buckles are reproductions of vintage hammered style hardware. As is typical of this style of jacket, it us unlined. It has ventilation grommets and shirt style cuffs. With a 42″ chest, this would best fit a size 38.

Tagged Size: Men’s Medium
Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24-1/4″

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