Women’s Mouton Collar Overcoat

I have sold a number of these, a Philcraft, a Supreme Fashion Tailored, a Zero King and a McDorsey. Not great sellers, in all honesty, but fantastic coats. Great materials, stylish, practical, and with the wide shoulders and nipped waist, really evocative of the era. I bought this one off the internet thinking it would be another of the same, but it shows up, and it’s not a men’s coat from the estate of a WWII vet as the seller claimed, but the ladies version, probably belonging to his wife. If you’re a seller- I’m probably the kind of guy you want as a buyer, because I didn’t complain. It’s interesting, having both the men’s and women’s versions, to compare the two. This is still a remarkably masculine cut. The defining feature of the style is the square, heavily padded shoulders. These are a bit narrower, but proportionately, they have the same effect as on the men’s coat. This one is heavily darted to nip the waist in to give it a more feminine form, but it looks more like this was a pattern adapted from the men’s than an entirely new one.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281070735374

This vintage women’s overcoat was made in the later part of the 1940s. It has wide, heavily padded shoulder and a luxurious mouton collar. It is double breasted, belted and has turnback cuffs.

Chest: 22″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Sleeve: 24-1/2″

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Champ Featherweight fedora hat

It feels like a while since I’ve been in the fedora business.  It used to be they were my bread and butter.  I sold hats with a very small vintage clothing sideline.  There was a time, not too long ago, where I could walk into an antique store and come out with two or three golden-era fedoras or homburgs, at great prices.  But the ebay market has gone through the roof, and antique shops seem to be more picked over now.  Taking gambles on badly listed ebay hats to flip isn’t worth it when the price gets to big to comfortably eat.  While this Champ is a bit dirty and a bit past the era I prefer, it was still refreshing to see it quietly sitting on a shelf at an antique store, waiting to be taken home, steamed out and cleaned up.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281070476177

This vintage fedora was made by Champ in the early 1960s. It is a lightweight fur felt, with a bound brim, and simple hat band. It has a c-crease. Size 7-1/8

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1960s Winklepickers by Ritchie Deluxe

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271160095555

These vintage shoes were made in the 1960s.  They are marked Ritchie DeLuxe and Genesco. They are a cap toe winklepicker design, with extremely pointed toes and a cuban heel.  They have leather soles and nailed heels.  The heel lining on the right shoe is a bit loose, and there is a small punch through the leather in that shoe, both visible in the shot showing the text inside the shoe.  They are stamped a size 8D on the footbed.  From the amount of wear on these, I’d say they were tried on once or twice, but never actually worn, as even all the text on the sole is legible. The sole measures 12″ heel to toe, and 4″ at the widest part.    Photobucket

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Hudson’s Bay leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271159802541

The Hudson’s Bay company didn’t just make point blankets, blanket coats and fine furs, as this jacket shows. It’s a clean, simple design, with quality workmanship and materials.

This vintage leather jacket was made by the Hudson’s Bay Company. It is a classic utility jacket style, with handwarmer pockets and a zip breast pocket. It has a plain back and buttoned cuffs. The zippers are both Canadian made lightnings, with a Talon-style bell shaped puller. (Remember, Canadian made jackets have the puller on the left zipper track) The jacket is fully lined, and needs the lining re-stitched at the left underarm.

Chest: 22″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Shoulder to Cuff: 25-1/2″

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Hudson’s Bay point blanket shirt jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281067893704

This vintage jacket was made by the Hudson’s Bay Company from their iconic multi-stripe point blankets. It is single breasted, with a shirt style collar and cuffs, and flapped patch pockets. The lining material on the back side of the pocket flaps is heavily worn, as is typical. The jacket has taped seams and lined shoulders. It has a small variant of the Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket tag.

Chest (pit to pit): 27″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 20″
Shoulder to Cuff: 26″

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Hooded Woolrich jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271159624677

This vintage Woolrich coat has really great detailing. It has a brass Talon zipper front, with a buttoned wind flap. It is fully belted, with a chunky metal belt buckle. The handwarmer pockets close with brass talon zippers, and have leather reinforcements at the ends. The pocket trim forms the belt loops in the tradition of norfolk jackets. The front patch pockets are of the saddlebag variety, allowing them to expand when used. The coat has a hood, and a full sherpa lining, with quilted nylon in the sleeves. It is tagged a size 46, but with the 46″ chest measurement, fits like a size 42.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 19″
Shoulder to Cuff: 25″

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Cotler workwear jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271159771798

This vintage jacket was made in the 1980s by Cotler. It is heavily influenced by designs of the 1930s, with its belted back and pleated pockets, and its leather jacket influenced side buckles. It is tagged a size 44.
Chest: 23″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″

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Hudson’s Bay Blanket coats

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Made from Hudson’s Bay point blankets, these striped coats are iconically Canadian. The blanket design was introduced in the late 1700s by the HBC, and the material was soon adapted into coats by fur traders. Point blanket coats remained popular in Canada, first as utilitarian garments, later as fashion. The true Hudson’s Bay blankets were made in England. Some were tailored for and sold by the Bay, others, while they bear the fabric tag showing they were made from Hudson’s Bay blankets, were made into coats by and were retailed by third party companies, as is the case with the red Maine Guide coat pictured below.

Right from the start, there were competitor companies with their own striped trade blankets, like Early’s Witney Point, Horn Brothers, Trapper Point, or Ayers. The list went on, each with their own variation on the basic striped scheme. Many of these also made their way into the production of coats and jackets. The classic 20th century point blanket coat is a double breasted, belted mackinaw style, though the fabric has been tailored into everything from a “perfecto” style motorcycle jacket to a pullover hoodie.

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Recreation of HBC trading post, featuring point blanket capotes at left.
Hudson’s Bay Company Gallery, Manitoba Museum, Winnipeg

Examples from my collection
Top Row:
1950s Hudson’s Bay: The classic cut and colors. Interesting in that the orientation of the stripes is reversed from the usual
1960s Hudson’s Bay: Men’s shirt style. Also commonly seen in a women’s version.

Second Row:
c.1950s/1960s Mac Mor: Company founded in 1951, based out of North York, Ontario.
c. 1960s Gleneaton. Made of Ayers blanket. Milium insulated

Third Row:
1930s Hudson’s Bay. Very old one, with buttoned belt. Had buttons under collar for a hood
1940s Hudson’s Bay/ Maine Guide. Tailored by Maine Guide from HBC blanket

Fourth Row:
1960s Lakeland: Designed by Jeffrey Banks. 1949 union label. Same style blanket as the Buckskein, but reversed orientation
1950s Buck skein: Duffle coat style. “Thermalized” lining

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The bold patterns and bright colors of these blanket coats put them squarely into the “love it or hate it” category of vintage menswear, and outside of their native Canadian habitat can seem a bit out of context. While they can seem a bit flashy by modern menswear standards, these coats came from a rugged outdoor tradition.
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Photo from LIFE magazine photo archive

Men’s striped blanket coats are still available from a variety of makers, but they seem to have shied away from the traditional vibrant colors, opting instead for more subdued earth tones and shades of gray. While the Hudson’s Bay Company still retails their blankets (they now sell between $370 and $580), in an odd twist, their former competitors in the camp blanket market are now working with them. The material used in their current production blanket coats is made by Pendleton Woolen Mills. The blankets are distributed in the US by Woolrich Woolen Mills.

Current and recent offerings:

Rag and Bone $995

Freewheelers (Japan) BC Coat $990

Hudson Bay Company duffle $950

Monitaly Riders $949

Klaxon Howl

Hudson Bay Company $850

Burn Out (Japan) $540

Loyal $502

Fidelity $475

Houston (Japan) $267

Ralph Lauren duffle $265

Ralph Lauren

River Junction $260

Gap x GQ Ian Velardi $178

Topman $164

Whether vintage or modern, find your inner Canuck and give a blanket coat a chance.

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