1930s shawl collar leather barnstormer coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271820768421
This vintage leather coat was made in the 1930s. It is double breasted, with a mouton collar, leather knot style buttons, fancy buttoned cuffs, handwarmer and flapped cargo pockets with arrow stitched reinforcements, and a covered curly sheepskin lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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English work cap

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281347273002

This vintage work cap was made in England in the 1950s or 1960s.  It is made of blue cotton, and is unlined.  The original tag is still on and reads 57, which is equivalent to a UK 7 or a US 7-1/8

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Zecron Shawl Collar mackinaw

Also see:
Canada Goose shawl mackinaw
White collared mackinaw
Brown collared mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281070487250

This vintage coat is a classic workwear style, the shawl collar mackinaw. It has a canvas shell, with zipped breast pockets, cargo pockets, and leather buttons. The buttons are particularly unusual, as they are square as opposed to the usual round ones. The breast pocket zippers are Astro brand. The coat has a zip in shearling liner. Lining zips are also Astro brand, larger than the pocket zips. The coat was made by Zecron International – world wide weatherproof.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 24″
Shoulder to Cuff: 19″

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Hudson’s Bay Blanket coats

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Made from Hudson’s Bay point blankets, these striped coats are iconically Canadian. The blanket design was introduced in the late 1700s by the HBC, and the material was soon adapted into coats by fur traders. Point blanket coats remained popular in Canada, first as utilitarian garments, later as fashion. The true Hudson’s Bay blankets were made in England. Some were tailored for and sold by the Bay, others, while they bear the fabric tag showing they were made from Hudson’s Bay blankets, were made into coats by and were retailed by third party companies, as is the case with the red Maine Guide coat pictured below.

Right from the start, there were competitor companies with their own striped trade blankets, like Early’s Witney Point, Horn Brothers, Trapper Point, or Ayers. The list went on, each with their own variation on the basic striped scheme. Many of these also made their way into the production of coats and jackets. The classic 20th century point blanket coat is a double breasted, belted mackinaw style, though the fabric has been tailored into everything from a “perfecto” style motorcycle jacket to a pullover hoodie.

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Recreation of HBC trading post, featuring point blanket capotes at left.
Hudson’s Bay Company Gallery, Manitoba Museum, Winnipeg

Examples from my collection
Top Row:
1950s Hudson’s Bay: The classic cut and colors. Interesting in that the orientation of the stripes is reversed from the usual
1960s Hudson’s Bay: Men’s shirt style. Also commonly seen in a women’s version.

Second Row:
c.1950s/1960s Mac Mor: Company founded in 1951, based out of North York, Ontario.
c. 1960s Gleneaton. Made of Ayers blanket. Milium insulated

Third Row:
1930s Hudson’s Bay. Very old one, with buttoned belt. Had buttons under collar for a hood
1940s Hudson’s Bay/ Maine Guide. Tailored by Maine Guide from HBC blanket

Fourth Row:
1960s Lakeland: Designed by Jeffrey Banks. 1949 union label. Same style blanket as the Buckskein, but reversed orientation
1950s Buck skein: Duffle coat style. “Thermalized” lining

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The bold patterns and bright colors of these blanket coats put them squarely into the “love it or hate it” category of vintage menswear, and outside of their native Canadian habitat can seem a bit out of context. While they can seem a bit flashy by modern menswear standards, these coats came from a rugged outdoor tradition.
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Photo from LIFE magazine photo archive

Men’s striped blanket coats are still available from a variety of makers, but they seem to have shied away from the traditional vibrant colors, opting instead for more subdued earth tones and shades of gray. While the Hudson’s Bay Company still retails their blankets (they now sell between $370 and $580), in an odd twist, their former competitors in the camp blanket market are now working with them. The material used in their current production blanket coats is made by Pendleton Woolen Mills. The blankets are distributed in the US by Woolrich Woolen Mills.

Current and recent offerings:

Rag and Bone $995

Freewheelers (Japan) BC Coat $990

Hudson Bay Company duffle $950

Monitaly Riders $949

Klaxon Howl

Hudson Bay Company $850

Burn Out (Japan) $540

Loyal $502

Fidelity $475

Houston (Japan) $267

Ralph Lauren duffle $265

Ralph Lauren

River Junction $260

Gap x GQ Ian Velardi $178

Topman $164

Whether vintage or modern, find your inner Canuck and give a blanket coat a chance.

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French Despatch Rider Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281033518130

This vintage coat was made in 1948.  It is french army issue, either for a motorcycle despatch rider, or for the cavalry.  It has leg straps to keep it from flapping in the wind, and pass through slits instead of pockets.  It has a small collar, raglan sleeves, an attached belt and metal buttons. There are buttons inside which look like they could attach to a liner.
Chest: 30″ (doubled = 60″ = size 56)
Sleeve (center to cuff): 33-1/2″
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