1920s Stetson Clear Nutria cowboy hat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272104246504

This vintage cowboy hat was made in the 1920s by the John B. Stetson Company of Philadelphia, PA from Clear Nutria felt. Interestingly for such a huge western style, it was sold by John S. Harman & Son, Hatters, 87 New Bond Street, London.  The felt is amazingly pliable, with a high crown, a curled brim edge and a thin ribbon.  The lining is green, and the sweatband is textured brown leather, both bear a very detailed Stetson stamp. The lot no on the back of the sweatband, 5157, helps to date the hat.  The brim measures 4-1/4″, the crown measures 6-1/4″.

 photo edit stetson nutria.jpg

 photo DSCF3680.jpg

 photo DSCF3681.jpg

 photo DSCF3682.jpg

 photo DSCF3683.jpg

 photo DSCF3684.jpg

 photo DSCF3685.jpg

 photo DSCF3686.jpg

 photo DSCF3687.jpg

 photo DSCF3690.jpg

 photo DSCF3689.jpg

 photo DSCF3691.jpg

 photo DSCF3692.jpg

 photo DSCF3693.jpg

 photo DSCF3694.jpg

 photo DSCF3695.jpg

English National Fire Service uniform jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400995109392
This vintage jacket was made in 1952 for the British National Fire Service (NFS). It is sized as per English army uniforms, with a size no. 10 fitting between 5’7″ and 5’8″, with a chest of 38 inches, a waist or 34 inches. It was made by the Universal Clothing Co. At some point, probably in the 1970s, the body had a psychedelic lining partially applied over the original.

Chest (pit to pit): 19″ (doubled = 38″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 30-1/2″

 photo edit nfs.jpg

 photo DSCF8825_1.jpg

 photo DSCF8826_1.jpg

 photo DSCF8827.jpg

 photo DSCF8828_1.jpg

 photo DSCF8829_1.jpg

1970s Ibex East West six pocket leather hippie jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281512871868
This vintage jacket was made in England in the 1970s by Ibex of England – “Elegance in Leather”. It is made of what feels like lightweight deer, in a six pocket pattern made famous by East West Leathers. Aero Leathers made a version as the “Hippie Jacket” and Levis made one as the “Scorched Up” jacket. This is a real deal ’70s original. It has a six pocket front. The top two are open, the bottom four are pleated and flapped, and the bottom two have buckled belts assuring a secure closure. The back has side adjusters, and the sleeves have motorcycle jacket style zippers. Zippers are all English Clix brand. The jacket has a western style back yoke as well as pleats. The sleeve zippers have distinctive u shaped surrounds. The jacket is tagged a size 40.

Tagged size: 40
Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 22-1/2″

 photo editibex.jpg

 photo IMG_0033-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0034-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0035-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0036-4.jpg

 photo IMG_0038-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0039-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0043-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0044-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0041-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0042-2.jpg

1940s Maxproof waxed canvas coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271490626752
This vintage coat was made in the United Kingdom by Maxproof. It is made of heavy, waterproof waxed canvas. While it is single breasted, it has a double row of buttons, and double set of flaps to keep all water and wind out when riding your motorcycle in the rain. It has a side collar and throat latch / chinstrap which close the neck up equally as securely. The wrists can be cinched down with buttoned belts, and the length is long enough to keep you dry. There are three eyelets at each underarm for ventilation, and a rear vent.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

 photo IMG_0070.jpg

 photo IMG_0071.jpg

 photo IMG_0072.jpg

 photo IMG_0074.jpg

 photo IMG_0076.jpg

 photo IMG_0077.jpg

 photo IMG_0018-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0080.jpg

 photo IMG_0081.jpg

 photo IMG_0082.jpg

Hudson’s Bay Blanket coats

Photobucket

Made from Hudson’s Bay point blankets, these striped coats are iconically Canadian. The blanket design was introduced in the late 1700s by the HBC, and the material was soon adapted into coats by fur traders. Point blanket coats remained popular in Canada, first as utilitarian garments, later as fashion. The true Hudson’s Bay blankets were made in England. Some were tailored for and sold by the Bay, others, while they bear the fabric tag showing they were made from Hudson’s Bay blankets, were made into coats by and were retailed by third party companies, as is the case with the red Maine Guide coat pictured below.

Right from the start, there were competitor companies with their own striped trade blankets, like Early’s Witney Point, Horn Brothers, Trapper Point, or Ayers. The list went on, each with their own variation on the basic striped scheme. Many of these also made their way into the production of coats and jackets. The classic 20th century point blanket coat is a double breasted, belted mackinaw style, though the fabric has been tailored into everything from a “perfecto” style motorcycle jacket to a pullover hoodie.

Photobucket
Recreation of HBC trading post, featuring point blanket capotes at left.
Hudson’s Bay Company Gallery, Manitoba Museum, Winnipeg

Examples from my collection
Top Row:
1950s Hudson’s Bay: The classic cut and colors. Interesting in that the orientation of the stripes is reversed from the usual
1960s Hudson’s Bay: Men’s shirt style. Also commonly seen in a women’s version.

Second Row:
c.1950s/1960s Mac Mor: Company founded in 1951, based out of North York, Ontario.
c. 1960s Gleneaton. Made of Ayers blanket. Milium insulated

Third Row:
1930s Hudson’s Bay. Very old one, with buttoned belt. Had buttons under collar for a hood
1940s Hudson’s Bay/ Maine Guide. Tailored by Maine Guide from HBC blanket

Fourth Row:
1960s Lakeland: Designed by Jeffrey Banks. 1949 union label. Same style blanket as the Buckskein, but reversed orientation
1950s Buck skein: Duffle coat style. “Thermalized” lining

Photobucket

The bold patterns and bright colors of these blanket coats put them squarely into the “love it or hate it” category of vintage menswear, and outside of their native Canadian habitat can seem a bit out of context. While they can seem a bit flashy by modern menswear standards, these coats came from a rugged outdoor tradition.
Photobucket
Photo from LIFE magazine photo archive

Men’s striped blanket coats are still available from a variety of makers, but they seem to have shied away from the traditional vibrant colors, opting instead for more subdued earth tones and shades of gray. While the Hudson’s Bay Company still retails their blankets (they now sell between $370 and $580), in an odd twist, their former competitors in the camp blanket market are now working with them. The material used in their current production blanket coats is made by Pendleton Woolen Mills. The blankets are distributed in the US by Woolrich Woolen Mills.

Current and recent offerings:

Rag and Bone $995

Freewheelers (Japan) BC Coat $990

Hudson Bay Company duffle $950

Monitaly Riders $949

Klaxon Howl

Hudson Bay Company $850

Burn Out (Japan) $540

Loyal $502

Fidelity $475

Houston (Japan) $267

Ralph Lauren duffle $265

Ralph Lauren

River Junction $260

Gap x GQ Ian Velardi $178

Topman $164

Whether vintage or modern, find your inner Canuck and give a blanket coat a chance.

Photobucket

G.A. Dunn green fedora

This one is long since sold, but is an unusual example. You don’t see too many green felts, to begin with. This one has delicate ventilation holes, a light colored sweatband, and a fancy bow. It appears that at some point the hat was reversed, maybe to even out wear so as to avoid a hole at the pinch? The model is “The Polo”.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket