Talon Zip Ideal spats. 1937

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271221584141
These vintage spats were made in 1937 by the short lived company “Ideal Spats”. They were made shortly after Hookless re-organised into Talon, so while the puller has the traditional Hookless shape, it is only marked with the Talon name. The bottom of the stopbox is marked I7. The stopbox is of the sunburst “deco” design, and the slider mirrors the deco rays. The zipper is equipped with a rau snap, which secures the pull to the leather. The spats are a small size,

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Zippers come to jackets, 1927-1930

The fully separable zipper was invented in 1927 by Gideon Sundback. It’s covered by patents 1813433 and 1813432.
From the invention of the zipper in 1913 until that point, zippers had been limited in their usage by an attached end. It was suitable for coverall suits, luggage and pullovers. But it made it inconvenient for applications in jackets. The new unlockable/ fully separable bottom end of the zipper allowed for its easy usage on jackets. By 1930, zipper fronted jackets were well on their way to becoming common.

1925. Typical 1920s style. Button front, marketed as a windbreaker, specifically for the sporting set. Suede was extremely common in this era.
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1929. Before the modern separable bottom to the zipper, this pullover style was the workaround.
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1930. Early zipper front style.
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Lakeland Laskinlamb Grizzly leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271198828888

This jacket is a high end reproduction of the “Grizzly” style jacket, popular in the mid 1930s. It was made by Toyo Enterprises, who make jackets for Buzz Rickson, Sugar Cane and Style Eyes. Accurate down to the last detail, it bears a reproduction of a 1930s “Lakeland” hang tag. It has “laskinlamb” mouton panels on the front and back, with a matching mouton collar. The sleeves and trim are horsehide leather. The idea of these jackets was to put the insulation on the outside so that the wearer could have an unobstructed range of motion. They were promoted heavily in an athletic context, promoted by football players, that sort of thing. This jacket is as near as you can get to walking into a store in 1934 and buying one. It has an early Hookless grommet zipper, and dot snap. The original tags are still on the jacket and include a nice reproduction piece to accompany that zip. The front of the jacket is belted, as are the sleeves. There is a snap chinstrap to cinch it up at the neck. Inside, the body has a plaid lining, while the sleeves are lined in brown twill. There are wool storm cuffs to keep the breeze from blowing up the sleeves.

Tagged size: 42
Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 26″
Waist: 20″

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Wheels of Man suede cafe racer

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271103039663

This vintage leather jacket was made in the late ’60s or 1970s.  It is heavy roughout cowhide suede.  It has a talon main zipper and talon cuff zippers.  The top collar snap bears the logo of the maker, Wheels of Man.  The jacket has an action back, two handwarmer pockets and zippped cuffs.  There is general wear and staining to the suede throughout the jacket.  The left cuff is worn and the stitching at the end of the seam has let go.  The right cuff has similar damage, and several small tears around the zipper.  The lining also bears the logo of the company and is stained, especially towards the bottom hem.
Chest: 23″ (doubled =46″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (Collar to Hem): 28″
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Talon Zippers

There are many more patterns of Talon zippers out there, so consider this a (very) incomplete guide. It is interesting, though, to see the evolution of Talon sliding fasteners over the years, 1930s-1960s, in the design of their pullers and stop boxes.

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