Jack Frost peak lapel suit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401057283971

This vintage suit was made by the Utah Woolen Mills of Salt Lake City, Utah under their Jack Frost Woolen Wear label.  A classic 1950s western style, this one was made relatively late for the details, in 1962.  It has a striped fabric, with peak lapels, a three button front, front and back yokes, bi-swing shoulders, double breast pockets, flapped, pleated pockets and leather buttons.  The pants have fancy western belt loops and pockets, and a button fly.
Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″
Waist (side to side):17-1/4″ (doubled = 34-1/2″)
Outseam: 40-1/2″
Inseam: 31″
Rise: 9.5″

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Wallace & Barnes hunting jacket reproduction

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272080553062

This vintage coat was made by Wallace & Barnes and is based on a 1920s-1930s hunting coat. It has two large cargo pockets, a snapped pocket in the middle and a pleated top pocket. There are contrast green panels and a yellow hood which stows into the collar.  It has an internal game pouch, with side entry.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled= 46″)

Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29-1/2″

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B-9 Parka

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271979807550
This vintage jacket was made in the 1940s. Similar to the USAAF B-9 jacket, but with extra length, I believe this was USN issue. It features a wartime Crown zipper, a mouton hood and throat latch, buttoned epaulettes, and a quilted lining. There are two rows of stitching overtop the lining which appear to have been added later.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″

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1950s Stafford Club atomic fleck jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271970579526
This jacket was made in the 1950s by Stafford Club fine clothes for S&L Stores. It is made of gray wool with red white and blue atomic flecks.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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Zippers come to jackets, 1927-1930

The fully separable zipper was invented in 1927 by Gideon Sundback. It’s covered by patents 1813433 and 1813432.
From the invention of the zipper in 1913 until that point, zippers had been limited in their usage by an attached end. It was suitable for coverall suits, luggage and pullovers. But it made it inconvenient for applications in jackets. The new unlockable/ fully separable bottom end of the zipper allowed for its easy usage on jackets. By 1930, zipper fronted jackets were well on their way to becoming common.

1925. Typical 1920s style. Button front, marketed as a windbreaker, specifically for the sporting set. Suede was extremely common in this era.
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1929. Before the modern separable bottom to the zipper, this pullover style was the workaround.
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1930. Early zipper front style.
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