Lakeland Wagon Wheel Jackinac

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281459936227
These Lakeland Wagonwheel Jackinac jackets were advertised heavily in 1947 and 1948, and appeared in Life Magazine. It is a twist on the classic red and black Hudson’s Bay point blanket style. It has a five button front. There is a zipped breast pocket, and shirt style cuffs. The zipper is an early style Talon chain zipper. The jacket is unlined and has taped seams. There is a nice recurrence of the stripe pattern on the underside of the collar.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″
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c. 1935 Congress Sportswear half-zip, half button point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271624812561
This vintage coat was made c.1935 by Congress Sportswear and would likely have been sold under the “Maine Guide” label. This is a highly unusual and short lived style produced by Congress, with a half-zip, half-button front. The bottom half zipped up with a Talon grommet zipper, and the top with a 3×6 double breasted closure, which can be buttoned closed, buttoned like coat lapels, or open like 19th century military uniforms. The coat has a zip hood, which can be folded up and snapped (with early United Carr snaps) to form a collar. The coat is unlined, as is typical of these early mackinaw coats, and has taped seams.
The coat is readily identifiable as a Congress Sportswear product by several details. Congress was one of the only manufacturers to produce this half-and-half style, but details, like the un-hemmed bottom edge, and the contrast pocket trim and cuff adjusters are unique to Maine Guide products. These coats were produced by Congress for several other house labels, namely Abercombie and Fitch.
The coat is made from Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket, with a 1930s label. This fabric was, at the time, one of the most expensive wool fabrics available for high-end outdoors garments. The zipper is identifiable as being manufactured in the mid 1930s by its bell shape, the deco rays found both on the slider and the pull and by the oval shaped attachment piece between the slider and pull, which had been replaced by the later 1930s by a square sided bersion. The grommets of the grommet zipper, as well as the primitive stop-box, are still in place, although the current zipper, slightly shorter than the original, can be identified as a later production model Talon by its rounded edged pull and stop-box design.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 36-1/2″

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1940s Maine Guide by Congress Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271617873047
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat was originally unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns. At some point a lining was added to the jacket, but not finished on the bottom edge. When you lift this later lining, you can see the original tags from the Hudson’s Bay Company and from Maine Guide, as well as the taped seams that indicate its original unlined construction. The coat was originally sold by Hudson’s Sport Store of Detroit.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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Here’s a shot of a green version of this same maker and model which I sold earlier in the year, showing what the lining/construction is like without the later lining overlay  photo green.jpg

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1930s Red Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281406858780
This vintage coat was made in the 1930s from Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets. It is a classic double breasted mackinaw cut. At some point, the coat was fully lined, but where it is coming away, you can see the taped seams and hanger loop which give away the original unlined construction, which was typical on blanket mackinaws of the era.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1920s point blanket Carss Mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281318812696
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in Orillia, Ontario in the 1920s or 1930s by the Carss Mackinaw company. It is made of striped point blanket material, with four patch pockets and a belted back. It has a squared off shawl collar, and caped shoulders, both distinctively Carss details. The coat is unlined, as is typical of mackinaws of this era.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length: 30-1/2″

A bit about the company, from a history piece I wrote for “The Fedora Lounge”: Carss Mackinaw made blanket coats in Orillia, Ontario from at least 1897. Their signature model was single breasted with caped shoulders and a squared-off shawl collar. They are most commonly seen in red, green, and khaki, all with a blanket stripe at the base. The fabric used in these coats was advertised as a whopping 44oz (although this one feels lighter), and was sourced from a variety of trade blanket manufacturers, including Hudson’s Bay and the Bird Woolen Mills. They were advertised as “The Only Genuine Mackinaw Made In Canada”. They were retailed by the Hudson’s Bay Company, as well as other stores.

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1920s hookless zipper front pullover Hudson’s Bay jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271422243118
This vintage jacket was made in the 1920s. It was tailored from Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, at the time, one of the most expensive wools on the market, prized for its warmth and vibrant colors.
The jacket is a pullover style, with an A-1 style knit waistband. The separable-bottomed zipper was not introduced by Hookless/Talon until 1930. Prior to that point, if a manufacturer wanted a zip-front to a jacket, it had to be closed-bottomed, which meant a pullover style. This zipper is an extremely rare early Hookless, dating to the 1920s. It has a bent wire pull, probably meant for a leather pull attachment. This design pre-dated the grommet-zipper by a good five years or more.
It has a shirt style collar, with a long chinstrap, a detail borrowed from work clothing. The opening of the zipper has a layer of wool behind it to keep anything from becoming snagged in the teeth of the zipper. The Hudson’s Bay Company label bears the logo used in the 1920s, pre-dating the inclusion of registration numbers in the late 1920s.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 21″ (Replacement of missing cuffs would probably bring length to 24-25″)
Length: 27″

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1930s Shanhouse Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket Mackinaw Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281263182073
This vintage mackinaw coat was made around 1936 by W. Shanhouse and Sons of Rockford, Illinois. Shanhouse Sportswear was a well known maker of the time, producing high quality mackinaws, like this one, as well as a variety of leather jackets. At the time, the Hudson’s Bay Point blanket wool option was the most expensive mackinaw available from Shanhouse. Hudson’s Bay blanket wool was prized for its extreme warmth, wind blocking, vibrant color and luxurious nap. This red and black color scheme was probably the most popular, followed by the multi-stripe.

I’ve sold a lot of these blanket mackinaws, and I think this one may be my favorite design so far. It has wide, pointed lapels, with the black stripe positioned underneath for a bit of extra “pop”. This one retains its original hood, attached under the collar with a red knit wool panel for a bit of stretch when worn. The hood spreads when not in use, doing up with a Talon zipper with a rare sunburst bell-shaped puller. Whereas many of these coats had pressed metal buckles, or leather covered ones, this one has a high quality, heavy duty cast buckle. The buttons are original and have a nice red swirl pattern to them. The ones on the sleeves have turned a bit more brown over the years. Instead of regular patch pockets, this one has fancy saddlebag pockets, and uses the red and black of the stripe nicely for contrast.
As is typical on these earlier mackinaws, this one is unlined. The blankets used on these earlier Hudson’s Bay Blanket coats were of much higher quality than later ones, thicker, denser and with a deeper nap. Compare a 1930s coat to a 1970s one and you’ll see what I mean. The points on this coat are located on the side seam. This one features an extra-large version of the Hudson’s Bay label, and a wonderfully designed “Shanhouse” label. The coat bears a United Garment Workers of America “Duck Goods” union label.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 33″

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1920s Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281244175192

This vintage mackinaw coat was made in the 1920s. It is tailored from red and black Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets, in a classic double breasted cut. The coat is belted, with flapped hip pockets and slash handwarmers on the chest. The belt has buttons instead of a buckle, a typically 1920s detail. As with most mackinaws of this era, this example is unlined, with finished interior seams. This blanket material was highly sought after in this era for serious outdoorsmen. Upgrading to point blanket material over standard mackinaw wool could almost double the price.

Chest (pit to pit): 20-1/2″
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length: 27″

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1920s Patrick Duluth red mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271349036566
This vintage coat was made in the late 1920s through early 1930s by the F.A. Patrick woolen mills of Duluth, Minnesota. It is made of red and black point blanket material. While nearly identical in weight, feel and point design to the point blankets made by the Hudson’s Bay Company, the material in this coat was made in-house in one of Patrick’s woolen mills. Patrick was renowned for their high quality blankets and woolen fabric. The coat has classic double breasted styling, with a button-on belt. As was typical on mackinaws of the 1910s-1930s, the coat is unlined, relying on the quality and weight of the wool for insulation. Patrick did an excellent job with marketing- their coats were the official uniforms of the White Sox, the NY Giants, the Chicago Cubs, the Duluth Eskimos (Later the Washington Redskins) among others. This is the same model, though in a different point blanket color combination, as worn by the Eskimos in the late 1920s.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length: 36″

A bit about the company, from a history piece I wrote for “The Fedora Lounge”
: The F.A. Patrick Company, proprietors of the Patrick-Duluth Woolen Mills of Duluth, Minnesota were responsible for taking the Mackinaw coat out of lumber camps of western Canada and introducing them to students, workmen and athletes across the United States. Early on, the Patrick Company were jobbers, making dry goods, primarily for clients in the Northwest of the United States in Canada. In 1901, Patrick began buying fabric from a Scandinavian mackinaw cloth factory in Fosston, Minnesota. In 1906, seeing potential, Patrick bought that factory and began making their own Mackinaw cloth, eventually becoming one of its leading producers. The fabric and the coats made from it were popular with miners, fur trappers, lumberjacks and hunters.

In 1912, Patrick launched a new, refined mackinaw design. It was double breasted, belted and sported a collar described in the ads of the period as a “nansen” collar. Though the term also existed then, we now refer to this style as a shawl collar. The coat was 35″ long and was available in 24 and 32 oz wool mackinaw cloth, in a wide variety of colors. Salesman Harry Harrington began to pitch the Patrick Mackinaw to clothiers in college towns. “It was not long after that that mackinaws became a fad with students generally, and as the college student invariably sets the styles for young men’s clothing, it quickly spread over the whole country”. The early mackinaw trend was marketed in a similar way to the current workwear trend, trading on the rugged associations of the workers for whom the garment was originally designed. The mackinaw fad boomed, and shortly, a number of other manufacturers sprung onto the scene, producing mackinaws of varying quality from a variety of cloths. Large quantities of Patrick mackinaws were sold through such high end stores as Brooks Brothers, Rogers Peet, Wannamaker, Abercrombie and Fitch, Brokaw Brothers, and A. Raymond.
It is around this 1912-1913 period where the name “Mackinaw” begins to be more associated with the short, double breasted, shawl collar style, and less with the mackinaw cloth material from which it was made. The fad lasted about a year and a half. Patrick could not keep up with the growing demand caused by the collegiate fad, and the inferior fabric quality of some competitors led to the downfall of this first-wave craze.

Seeing the end of the craze, Patrick-Duluth re-branded its mackinaw once again, refining its pattern and marketing it to farmers, children, hunters and outdoorsmen, workers, and sportsmen. Its durability, warmth, low price compared to comparable overcoats or sheeplined coats, made it an easy sell to these markets. Alongside sheeplined canvas coats, Patrick Mackinaws became the de-facto winter coat of railroad employees. To further expand the market, patterns were made for men and women, boys and girls. Patrick intensified their national advertising, placing ads in the Saturday Evening Post, Country Gentleman, Farm Journal, Woman’s World, American Boy, Youth’s Companion, Boy’s Life, and many more. The name of the product was shortened from “Patrick-Duluth Woolen Mill Mackinaw” to simply “Patrick”, in a bid to make their brand name the generic trade name on the market, thereby foiling the business of competitors. Their slogan “Bigger than Weather” was penned by Elbert Hubbard. Ads were illustrated by Peter Newell and Clare Briggs. In the years between 1911 and 1914, Patrick had quadrupled its production, expanding from their two story mill to a six story mill on Duluth habror, a garment factory in Duluth, and knitting and spinning mills in Mankato, MN.

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Carter & Churchill

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281228705281

This vintage coat was made in the 1920s by the Carter & Churchill Company of Lebanon, NH. The point blanket fabric was the most expensive option for this style of coat at the time, offering the greatest durability and warmth. The coat has a classic early mackinaw cut, with unlined construction, handwarmer pockets high on the chest, and flapped hip pockets. The coat has a buttoned belt (later ones generally had ones with buckles). The points of the blanket are thick and proudly on display. While the company which made this coat survived in various forms for decades, they stopped using this particular tag in the early 1930s.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/4″
Length: 32-1/2″

A bit about the company, from a piece I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”: Carter and Churchill was founded in 1869 by William S. Carter, after leaving his uncle’s company, H.W. Carter & Sons. He was joined by Frank C. Churchill (former salesman for HW Carter), who would come to be the company’s treasurer. The company was headquartered in Lebanon, New Hampshire, with a plant at 15 Parkhurst Street. Starting in 1880, they produced clothing under the “Profile” label, named after the (former) New Hampshire rock formation, the Old Man of the Mountain. They registered that trademark in 1916. Early on, they were also producers of Lebanon Overalls, work shirts, mackinaws and coats. As the decades wore on, they dropped product lines to specialize in their ski clothing lines, which they continued producing into the 1990s, under the “Profile” name.

 

 

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