1946 Albert Richard Spun Sun plaid coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281635072000
This vintage coat was made by Albert Richard in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1946. It is interlined with “Spun Sun” fiberglass insulation, pioneered by Albert Richard immediately after WWII. This model can be seen in the advertisement below. This is the early style “Spun Sun” fabric, before the introduction of the (R) symbol in 1947. Albert Richard was sold and relocated in 1952, closing shortly thereafter. This coat has a three button front, a broad collar and two flapped hip pockets.

Tagged size: 44
Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

 photo edit albert.jpg

 photo DSCF3726.jpg

 photo DSCF3727.jpg

 photo DSCF3728.jpg

 photo DSCF3729.jpg

 photo DSCF3731.jpg

 photo 194601Stitch.jpg

Advertisements

Swiss army overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281544150678
This vintage overcoat was made for the Swiss Army. It is made of gray green wool. It is double breasted, with epaulettes and button belt loops. It is half-lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″ (though depending on where cuff is, can be between 24″ and 30″)
Length (base of collar to hem): 49″

 photo DSCF8332.jpg

 photo DSCF8333.jpg

 photo DSCF8334.jpg

 photo DSCF8335.jpg

 photo DSCF8336.jpg

 photo DSCF8337.jpg

 photo DSCF8338.jpg

 photo DSCF8339.jpg

 photo DSCF8340.jpg

 photo DSCF8341.jpg

1950s German Leather Overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281263975843
This vintage leather overcoat was made in Germany in the 1950s. It is made from heavy russet brown leather- probably steerhide. It has yoked shoulders, a buttonless double breasted front, slash handwarmers, zipper pockets on the chest, and a zipper pocket behind the lapel. All zippers are riri. The coat has a full plaid lining and an intenal snap fastening belt. The back of the coat has a nice double inverted (non-functional) pleat sunburst design.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 47″

 photo IMG_1446.jpg

 photo IMG_1447.jpg

 photo IMG_1451.jpg

 photo IMG_1449.jpg

 photo IMG_1453.jpg

 photo IMG_1454.jpg

c.1947 day-glo men’s trunks

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281124841805
These vintage trunks were made in the late 1940s from the new “Day-Glo” fabric, made under patents 2417383 and 2417384. It certainly lives up to the claim of “fluorescent”. They have an elasticized waist (the elastic is still good), a full mesh liner, and a flapped, buttoned coin/key pocket. Postwar California beachwear at its finest. There is some fading, but it blends in somewhat with the shininess and day-glo effect of the fabric. With the waist, I would recommend these for a size 34-36.

Waist (unstretched): 13″ (doubled – 26″)
Waist (stretched): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Side Seam: 12″
Inseam: 2-3/8″
Rise: 14″

 photo dayglo.jpg

 photo IMG_0118.jpg

 photo IMG_0119.jpg

 photo IMG_0120.jpg

 photo IMG_0121.jpg

The McDorsey Yukon trench coat

This vintage coat was made just post WWII.  It is a double breasted trench coat style, with a mouton sheepskin collar, and a combination alpaca pile and quilted satin lining.  The gabardine shell of the coat is a medium blue color.  There is a detachable belt.  The coat was made by McDorsey Sportswear and is their “Yukon” model. One of the buttons does not match and there is wear to the bottom edge of the quilted liner.
Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Length (collar to hem): 39″
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

USN cold weather jacket

I’m not sure what the designation on this one is, other than that is is a Navy piece. It has a full removable alpaca lining and a cotton shell. Handwarmer pockets, flapped pockets, and a brass talon zipper. It got the hippie treatment later on in its life, probably bought surplus, and now proudly sports a Greatful Dead patch on its shoulder.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket