1940s overdyed brown Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271738984147
This vintage coat was made in the 1940s by the Hudson’s Bay Company. It is made of the English production blankets, which helps with the dating. The coat has broad shoulders and a double breasted cut. It has handwarmer pockets and a plain back. It appears that the coat was at one point overdyed dark brown. Although Hudson’s Bay did make shorter length bay blanket coats, I have not seen this particular style from them before, which, in combination with the period color change makes me wonder if this was at some point professionally altered from a longer coat. Whatever the case may be, it was done well, and gives it a distinctive and sporty look.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

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1950s Zero King hudson’s bay point blanket jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271738364402
This vintage jacket was made in the 1950s by Zero King Sports Apparel. It is tailored from a red and black point blanket, possibly Hudson’s Bay, but there are no mill tags on it. The jacket is single breasted, with a zipper front. The original zipper has been replaced with a vinyl YKK, which works well. The jacket has caped shoulders, similar to earlier Carss mackinaw detailing. It is partially lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

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1940s Maine Guide Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281537094331
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat is unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
(doubled = 46″) Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35=1/2″

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1930s Pendleton striped blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281537063063
This vintage coat was made in the early 1930s from striped point blanket material. While the Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets had a striped pattern with four stripes at each end of the blanket running indigo, yellow, red, green, this coat was made from a blanket with a continuous stripe patterned blanket running red, orange, indigo, green and then repeating. While there are no labels on this coat, I have seen this blanket pattern attributed to the Pendleton woolen mills. The pattern of the blanket has been inverted for the sleeves and runs vertically for the collar, giving some real interest there. The coat has handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets. It has a double breasted cut and as is typical of mackinaw coats produced in the 1930s and prior, this example was made unlined.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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1920s Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281537081193
This vintage coat was made in the mid 1920s from Hudson’s Bay point blanket material. It is made in an early style mackinaw cut, double breasted with cargo pockets (but no handwarmers), and with even button spacing all the way to the top, similar to early peacoats. As is typical for these early cuts, the coat is unlined. It bears a style of label which stopped being used by Hudson’s Bay in the late 1920s. These early blankets are also easily discernible from more modern ones by their heavier weight and deeper nap.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 34″

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1970s Women’s Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket coat no. 2

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281536198002
This vintage coat was made by the Hudson’s Bay Company from their iconic multi-stripe point blankets. The coat is double breasted, with a pleated vent and handwarmer pockets.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled =40)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

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1970s Women’s Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket coat no. 1

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271714816075
This vintage coat was made by the Hudson’s Bay Company from their iconic multi-stripe point blankets. The coat is double breasted, with a pleated vent and handwarmer pockets. The inside of the coat is stained. While the front of the coat is missing two of its distinctive buttons, there is an extra inside, and one underneath the collar, so that could be easily remedied.

Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22″
Length (base of collar to hem): 30″

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1930s H.W. Carter & Sons red and black point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271670833049
This vintage jacket was made by H.W. Carter & Sons of Lebanon, New Hampshire in the mid 1930s. It is made of heavy red and black point blanket material, in a single breasted mackinaw style. Unusual for a point blanket coat, this example has a game pocket, which does up with two early Hookless-style Talon zippers. The coat has a zipper hood which snaps down into a collar. The hood zips open and closed with a Talon zipper, the design of which dates this jacket to c.1937. The coat bears a United Garment Workers of America union label, as well as a black and yellow tag identifying the material as water repellent and all wool. The jacket is fully lined in mustard colored cotton, similar to what Woolrich was using on their hunting coats in this period, especially in its use of a single patch breast pocket. The mackinaw has snap closure cargo pockets as well as handwarmers.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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c. 1935 Congress Sportswear half-zip, half button point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271624812561
This vintage coat was made c.1935 by Congress Sportswear and would likely have been sold under the “Maine Guide” label. This is a highly unusual and short lived style produced by Congress, with a half-zip, half-button front. The bottom half zipped up with a Talon grommet zipper, and the top with a 3×6 double breasted closure, which can be buttoned closed, buttoned like coat lapels, or open like 19th century military uniforms. The coat has a zip hood, which can be folded up and snapped (with early United Carr snaps) to form a collar. The coat is unlined, as is typical of these early mackinaw coats, and has taped seams.
The coat is readily identifiable as a Congress Sportswear product by several details. Congress was one of the only manufacturers to produce this half-and-half style, but details, like the un-hemmed bottom edge, and the contrast pocket trim and cuff adjusters are unique to Maine Guide products. These coats were produced by Congress for several other house labels, namely Abercombie and Fitch.
The coat is made from Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket, with a 1930s label. This fabric was, at the time, one of the most expensive wool fabrics available for high-end outdoors garments. The zipper is identifiable as being manufactured in the mid 1930s by its bell shape, the deco rays found both on the slider and the pull and by the oval shaped attachment piece between the slider and pull, which had been replaced by the later 1930s by a square sided bersion. The grommets of the grommet zipper, as well as the primitive stop-box, are still in place, although the current zipper, slightly shorter than the original, can be identified as a later production model Talon by its rounded edged pull and stop-box design.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 36-1/2″

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1940s Maine Guide by Congress Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271617873047
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat was originally unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns. At some point a lining was added to the jacket, but not finished on the bottom edge. When you lift this later lining, you can see the original tags from the Hudson’s Bay Company and from Maine Guide, as well as the taped seams that indicate its original unlined construction. The coat was originally sold by Hudson’s Sport Store of Detroit.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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Here’s a shot of a green version of this same maker and model which I sold earlier in the year, showing what the lining/construction is like without the later lining overlay  photo green.jpg

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