1940s Allen western suit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400944277463
This vintage suit was made in the late 1940s in Denver, Colorado by the Allen Mfg. Co. It is made of 100% Virgin Wool gabardine. This style of western suit came into being just after WWII, and was sort of a greatest hits version of details of 1930s suits, with its saddlebag patch pockets, wide peak lapels, bi-swing shoulders and suppressed waist. The square cutaway, popular in the 1910s-1920s, gives the suit a western flair, as do the fancy pockets on the pants and the wide belt loops. The pants are flat front and cuffless.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/4
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

Waist (side to side): 18″ (doubled = 36″)
Outseam: 42″
Inseam: 30-1/2″ (3″ in hem, so probably about 2.5″ that could be let out)
Rise: 11.5″

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Late 1940s H Bar C gabardine belt-back western suit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400940800660
This vintage suit was made in the mid-late 1940s by H Bar C of California. It is made of wool gabardine, with a waist length cossack style jacket, with a half-belt back, handwarmer pockets, breast pocket and talon main zipper. The pants are western in style.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/4″ (doubled = 42-1/2″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 24-1/2″

Waist (side to side): 15″ (doubled = 30″)
Inseam: 29″
Outseam: 39″
Rise: 10″

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1920s Cravenette trench coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281687540794
This vintage coat was made in the mid to late 1920s. The jacket is wool gabardine that has been Cravenette Processed to shed showers. The process’s name became a generic name at this period for this style of coats that doubled as lightweight overcoats and as raincoats.
The “double service – for clear days for storm days” slogan of Cravenette’s was phased out by the late 1920s, helping to further narrow the dating down. The coat is a double breasted trench coat style, introduced c. 1915. The jacket has a half-belt back, with a center pleat terminating in triangular reinforcement stitching. It is partially lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Sleeve (center of collar to cuff): 32″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 43″
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1940s Hollywood Sportswear Hollywood jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281687560671
This vintage jacket was tailored by the Hollywood Sportswear Company of Los Angeles California in the late 1940s – early 1950s. It is made of tan gabardine, with patch pockets and pick stitched collar detailing. It is fully lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1950s Penney’s Sportclad gabardine jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281644153631
This vintage jacket was made in the early 1950s for Penney’s under the Sportclad label. It is made of khaki colored wool gabardine, with elastic side panels for a neat silhouette, an evolution of the half-belt and side adjuster buckes of 1930s jackets of a similar style. The jacket has a Talon zipper, with the deep grooved, unmarked U shaped stop box which was used in the early 1950s.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24-3/8″

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1940s gabardine half-belt jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271783149533
This vintage jacket was made in the mid-late 1940s. It is gabardine, made in a waist length utility jacket style, with a half-belt back with a center pleat, straight yoke and side adjuster buckles. The jacket has a Talon main zipper, with a square cornered slider and U shaped Talon stopbox, which was produced in the immediate post-war years. The jacket is fully lined, and does not have a label.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24-1/2″

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1940s Saddle Sturdy Brand gabardine jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281601299399
This vintage jacket was made in the late 1940s by Glenshore of Denver, Colorado under their Saddle Sturdy Brand label. It is made of wool gabardine, in a western flavored waist length utility jacket style. It has curving seams front and back, well integrated handwarmer and breast pockets, side adjuster tabs and a long collar. It has a zipper front with a no. 3 Talon zipper, with a squared corner slider with rectangular hole, and unmarked wide rib stopbox, which help nail down the late 1940s date.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 24″

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1950s Albert Richard mouton collared jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271761437968
This vintage jacket was made in the early 1950s by Albert Richard. It is made of dark blue-green gabardine, with a gray collar. It is made in a surcoat style and has flapped patch pockets. The jacket has a style of Talon zipper stopbox which I have not seen before in this application, but a standard early ’50s no. 5 zipper tape and slider. The jacket has a quilted lining. With a buyout in 1953 and a label change, this jacket dates from around 1951-52. This model is pictured in an advertisement from Albert Richard from 1951, see below.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 30″

A bit on the history of Albert Richard:
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability. During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert Richard in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war. President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores. Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

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