1940s two tone Hollywood jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272031152885
This vintage Hollywood jacket was made in the 1940s-early 1950s. It is two tone brown on brown wool, and appears to be home tailored.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 27″

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1950s Atomic Fleck hollywood jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400986675607
This is a great Hollywood jacket, with belted, gathered back, front and back yokes and an antomic fleck green fabric. It appears to have been relined at some point in a clashing stretchy polyester.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32-1/2″

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1940s Hollywood Sportswear Hollywood jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281687560671
This vintage jacket was tailored by the Hollywood Sportswear Company of Los Angeles California in the late 1940s – early 1950s. It is made of tan gabardine, with patch pockets and pick stitched collar detailing. It is fully lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1940s FriscoJac

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271791891521
This vintage jacket was made by the Minnesota Woolen Company of Duluth Minnesota under the Frisco Jac label. It is made of a flecky wool material, and is unlined.

Tagged size: 40
Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1940s Patrick Duluth Hollywood jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281479077025
This vintage jacket was made by the FA Patrick Company of Duluth, Minnesota. It is made in blue-gray striped wool, in a casual Hollywood jacket style. It has three patch pockets and a wide collar. From the label and styling, this jacket dates from the late 1940s to early 1950s.
Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

A bit about the company, from a history piece I wrote for “The Fedora Lounge”
: The F.A. Patrick Company, proprietors of the Patrick-Duluth Woolen Mills of Duluth, Minnesota were responsible for taking the Mackinaw coat out of lumber camps of western Canada and introducing them to students, workmen and athletes across the United States. Early on, the Patrick Company were jobbers, making dry goods, primarily for clients in the Northwest of the United States in Canada. In 1901, Patrick began buying fabric from a Scandinavian mackinaw cloth factory in Fosston, Minnesota. In 1906, seeing potential, Patrick bought that factory and began making their own Mackinaw cloth, eventually becoming one of its leading producers. The fabric and the coats made from it were popular with miners, fur trappers, lumberjacks and hunters.

In 1912, Patrick launched a new, refined mackinaw design. It was double breasted, belted and sported a collar described in the ads of the period as a “nansen” collar. Though the term also existed then, we now refer to this style as a shawl collar. The coat was 35″ long and was available in 24 and 32 oz wool mackinaw cloth, in a wide variety of colors. Salesman Harry Harrington began to pitch the Patrick Mackinaw to clothiers in college towns. “It was not long after that that mackinaws became a fad with students generally, and as the college student invariably sets the styles for young men’s clothing, it quickly spread over the whole country”. The early mackinaw trend was marketed in a similar way to the current workwear trend, trading on the rugged associations of the workers for whom the garment was originally designed. The mackinaw fad boomed, and shortly, a number of other manufacturers sprung onto the scene, producing mackinaws of varying quality from a variety of cloths. Large quantities of Patrick mackinaws were sold through such high end stores as Brooks Brothers, Rogers Peet, Wannamaker, Abercrombie and Fitch, Brokaw Brothers, and A. Raymond.
It is around this 1912-1913 period where the name “Mackinaw” begins to be more associated with the short, double breasted, shawl collar style, and less with the mackinaw cloth material from which it was made. The fad lasted about a year and a half. Patrick could not keep up with the growing demand caused by the collegiate fad, and the inferior fabric quality of some competitors led to the downfall of this first-wave craze.

Seeing the end of the craze, Patrick-Duluth re-branded its mackinaw once again, refining its pattern and marketing it to farmers, children, hunters and outdoorsmen, workers, and sportsmen. Its durability, warmth, low price compared to comparable overcoats or sheeplined coats, made it an easy sell to these markets. Alongside sheeplined canvas coats, Patrick Mackinaws became the de-facto winter coat of railroad employees. To further expand the market, patterns were made for men and women, boys and girls. Patrick intensified their national advertising, placing ads in the Saturday Evening Post, Country Gentleman, Farm Journal, Woman’s World, American Boy, Youth’s Companion, Boy’s Life, and many more. The name of the product was shortened from “Patrick-Duluth Woolen Mill Mackinaw” to simply “Patrick”, in a bid to make their brand name the generic trade name on the market, thereby foiling the business of competitors. Their slogan “Bigger than Weather” was penned by Elbert Hubbard. Ads were illustrated by Peter Newell and Clare Briggs. In the years between 1911 and 1914, Patrick had quadrupled its production, expanding from their two story mill to a six story mill on Duluth habror, a garment factory in Duluth, and knitting and spinning mills in Mankato, MN.

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1940s Zero King Hollywood Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271370802233
This vintage Hollywood jacket was made in the 1940s by Zero-King. It has a wool gabardine body, and suede leather trim with fringe. It has button adjusters on the sides, and leather cuffs.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length: 28″

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Action front 1960s sportcoat

This vintage tweed jacket was made by Greyhound. It is an unusual style, which makes dating a bit tricky, but from the lining and label, I would lean towards the early 1960s. Stylistically, it draws heavily from leisurewear of the 1940s. It has a Hollywood jacket style collar. There are twin breast pockets, which are still basted shut. Large, deep pleats run from these breast pockets to the flapped hip pockets. The jacket has a four button front and a square cutaway.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″
Shoulder to shoulder: 20-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (bottom of collar to hem): 30″

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