1930s field boots

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272013552822
These vintage boots were made in the 1930s. They are a tall lace up field boot style, with speed hooks, the original metal tipped flat cotton laces, plain toes, nailed leather soles and rubber heels of a great design I haven’t seen before. They are a size 10 and measure 12″ heel to toe and 4-1/4″ at the widest point of the sole.

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original 1930s working cowboy’s cowboy boots

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400938388587
These vintage boots were made in the 1930s, and have short shafts with a deeply scalloped top cut. They have leather soles and narrow, tall, nailed leather heels. While the flashy boots of the ’30s-’50s survive, the plainer, workingman’s boots like this are extremely hard to come by. They measure 12″ heel to toe, 4″ at the widest point. While the leather isn’t cracked, it would take some work to get these back into wearable condition.

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1950s D-Pocket leather jacket biker cut

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400926403996
This vintage leather jacket was made in the 1950s, and was likely sold by Sears under the Fieldmaster label. This is distinguished as one of the earlier production Sears D-pockets by the small Talon zipper (before they switched to either larger Talons or Serval zips). This has a separate square bottomed patch pocket cigarette pocket, which was replaced by the late 1950s-early 1960s by a internal pocket with just the flap. The D-pocket is also a separate piece of leather, while on later manufactured versions (with either the Oakbrook or Leather Shop labels) the pocket was accomplished with stitching and a welt. This also has a tunneled belt loop through the kidney panel rather than the attached quarter belts of later versions. The earliest Sears branded D-Pockets were produced under contract by Buco in Detroit, Michigan, while later 1950s versions were produced in California. At some point, this jacket was used by a member of a biker gang, as evidenced by stitch marks left by the removal of a club insignia and top and bottom rockers. The Harley Davidson patch, which would have been added by the jacket’s owner, and which would not have been the property of the club, is still on the jacket’s kidney panel. With a chest measurement of 46″, this would fit a 42 if worn over a shirt, or roughly a 38-40 if worn over a denim jacket

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Waist (side to side): 18-1/2″ (doubled = 37″)
Shoulder to shoulder:19″
Length (base of collar to hem): 21″

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Captoe dress boots

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281479092219
This vintage pair of boots is typical of dress boots of the 1920s, although the heels and overall construction make me think they were manufactured in the 1940s. They remained popular at that point with older, more conservative markets. They are made of black leather with five eyelets and four speed hooks. They have black flat cotton laces, and a nice curve to the back seam. The boots have Vulcan rubber heels and a leather sole.

1930s Montgomery Ward Pony Horsehide aviator cossack jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281409286745
This vintage leather jacket was made in the late 1930s-early 1940s. It was made in California and was sold by Montgomery Ward under their Sportswear label. The “Aviator” style, a precursor to the modern motorcycle jacket, was popular in this late ’30s-1940s time period, and this is an excellent example. It has an asymmetrical / double breasted zipper design, with handwarmer pockets and double zipped breast pockets. The zippers are all Talons. The chest zippers are the originals, with ring style pulls and Talon branded sliders, a style which stopped production in the 1940s. The main zipper is a replacement, probably done in the late 1950s. Interestingly, the slider has had the pull replaced with a 1930s fan-tail pull, possibly off the original zip. The jacket has a half-belt back with teardrop shaped buckles. The jacket is fully lined, with a wonderful label with a California mission and palm tree. The jacket is made of pony horsehide.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Waist (side to side): 18″ (doubled = 36″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 21″

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