1940s Front Quarter horsehide jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281349331760
This vintage leather jacket was made in the 1940s. The style, with knit waistband and cuffs, and slash handwarmer pockets was popular after the war. It is made of full grain front quarter horsehide, with a mouton collar. The jacket is lined in alpaca and corduroy, with quilted sleeve linings. The zipper is a later replacement from a no-name maker, with non-matching stitching. The cuffs and knit waistband also appear to be replacements. The jacket has a one piece back with a straight shoulder yoke. The horsehide has wonderful grain accented by decades of use. I have seen this particular design of yellow and black horsehide label, and this style of lining on earlier button front barnstormer models, but not on a post-war bomber jacket style like this. The leather has wear and loss of finish, but is still solid and supple.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to end of cuff): 23″

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Town and Country Sheeplined Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281230598392
This vintage sheeplined coat was made in the 1930s under the Guiterman Bros. “Town and Country” label. The coat is made of green canvas, with a brown mouton shawl collar. As was common with coats of this style, it has loops instead of buttonholes. Usually these loops are made of corded material, but this one has higher quality leather loops. There are slash handwarmer pockets on the chest and flapped cargo pockets on the hips. The corners of the pockets have leather reinforcements. The coat is lined to the hip with sheepskin, and the sleeves have blanket linings and wool storm cuffs. The coat is belted.

A bit on the company’s history, from a piece I wrote for The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets / The Fedora Lounge: Guiterman Brothers was founded in 1883 and incorporated in 1904. They began using the Summit “Town & Country” name in 1904. In the early 1910s, Guiterman Brothers pioneered the attached soft collared shirt. They also called it the Summit. The company had a plant at 352 Silbey Street, St. Paul, MN, which still stands. They enjoyed prosperity during the 1910s, riding the Mackinaw boom of 1915. They were supposedly the first company to coin the name “windbreaker”. As shown above, their “Town and Country” Coats and vests shared the distinctive double snap Knit-Nek. During WWI, Guiterman Bros. produced flying coats for US aviators. In 1928-1929, the company was purchased by Gordon and Ferguson and continued production.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length: 39″

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More from this company:

Sears Fieldmaster shawl collar mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271306426480
This vintage coat was made in the 1940s or 1950s, and was sold by Sears under their Fieldmaster label. It as a canvas shell, with slash handwarmer pockets and flapped hip pockets. Both have leather reinforcement at the corners. As was typical with this style of coat, there are loops instead of butonholes. The collar is black mouton, the lining is sheepskin. The sleeves have a quilted lining. Although this coat was made in the ’40s or ’50s, the style had been around basically unchanged since the turn of the 20th century. They were popular as workwear for men who worked outdoors- for whom a coat that was lightweight yet warm, and which was rugged was a must.

The reinforcements are very similar to what was on the Montgomery Ward coats of the same era.  Possibly the same maker? https://vintagehaberdashers.com/2013/03/14/powr-house-shawl-collar-mackinaw/

This one is also quite similar: https://vintagehaberdashers.com/2012/05/23/shawl-collar-mackinaw/

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length: 32″

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Lakeland Laskinlamb Grizzly leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271198828888

This jacket is a high end reproduction of the “Grizzly” style jacket, popular in the mid 1930s. It was made by Toyo Enterprises, who make jackets for Buzz Rickson, Sugar Cane and Style Eyes. Accurate down to the last detail, it bears a reproduction of a 1930s “Lakeland” hang tag. It has “laskinlamb” mouton panels on the front and back, with a matching mouton collar. The sleeves and trim are horsehide leather. The idea of these jackets was to put the insulation on the outside so that the wearer could have an unobstructed range of motion. They were promoted heavily in an athletic context, promoted by football players, that sort of thing. This jacket is as near as you can get to walking into a store in 1934 and buying one. It has an early Hookless grommet zipper, and dot snap. The original tags are still on the jacket and include a nice reproduction piece to accompany that zip. The front of the jacket is belted, as are the sleeves. There is a snap chinstrap to cinch it up at the neck. Inside, the body has a plaid lining, while the sleeves are lined in brown twill. There are wool storm cuffs to keep the breeze from blowing up the sleeves.

Tagged size: 42
Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 26″
Waist: 20″

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Women’s Mouton Collar Overcoat

I have sold a number of these, a Philcraft, a Supreme Fashion Tailored, a Zero King and a McDorsey. Not great sellers, in all honesty, but fantastic coats. Great materials, stylish, practical, and with the wide shoulders and nipped waist, really evocative of the era. I bought this one off the internet thinking it would be another of the same, but it shows up, and it’s not a men’s coat from the estate of a WWII vet as the seller claimed, but the ladies version, probably belonging to his wife. If you’re a seller- I’m probably the kind of guy you want as a buyer, because I didn’t complain. It’s interesting, having both the men’s and women’s versions, to compare the two. This is still a remarkably masculine cut. The defining feature of the style is the square, heavily padded shoulders. These are a bit narrower, but proportionately, they have the same effect as on the men’s coat. This one is heavily darted to nip the waist in to give it a more feminine form, but it looks more like this was a pattern adapted from the men’s than an entirely new one.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281070735374

This vintage women’s overcoat was made in the later part of the 1940s. It has wide, heavily padded shoulder and a luxurious mouton collar. It is double breasted, belted and has turnback cuffs.

Chest: 22″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Sleeve: 24-1/2″

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Philcraft alpaca lined mouton collared gabardine overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281056381932

This vintage bold look overcoat was made in the 1940s. It has a blue gabardine shell and a button on belt. The coat has a shearling collar and an alpaca lining. The wide shoulders are heavily padded. It was sold by St. Clair Page of Marshfield, WI. Cravenette processed.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″

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DeLong sportswear jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281050466717

This vintage jacket was made in the early 1950s by DeLong sportswear.  It is made of “Nylodeen”, a miracle fabric advertised heavily in the 1950s, which was a nylon-wool blend in a gabardine weave, designed to shed water more readily than a standard all wool gabardine. The pile collar of this coat was described in period advertisements as being a timme-mouton.  It has a front belt, a talon zipper and a quilted lining. It is tagged a size 40.Other than the color and size, the coat worn by Flick in “A Christmas Story” is nearly identical. Tagged size: 40Chest: 23″Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″    PhotobucketPhotobucket

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Albert Richard leather jacket

This vintage leather jacket was made by Albert Richards.  It is their “Shetland” model, made of “Satintan” horsehide, with a “Beavertex” mouton collar.  It has an alpaca lined body and quilted lined sleeves.  The main zipper is a post-war Talon.  The prong is still attached to the zipper tape, but is coming away from the body of the jacket, so a new zipper may be in order. The pocket zipper appears to have had the puller chain replaced with a piece of wire some time back.  The jacket has a one piece back, knit waistband and cuffs, epaulettes and flannel lined handwarmer pockets.  The leather is heavily grained with a great patina.  There is definite wear to it, and some small light patches of paint, but there are no holes or tears.  The knits have some mothing, and it looks from the difference in color that either the cuffs or the waistband are are replacement.  The aplaca pile lining shows wear, where bits of the pile have worn down to the fabric. There are three ventilation grommets under each arm.
Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 19-1/2″
Length (collar to hem): 26″PhotobucketPhotobucket

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Mouton Collared Trench Coat by Supreme Fashion Tailored Clothes

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281022711661

This vintage overcoat was made in the years following WWII. This style was popular in the late 1940s in through about the mid 1950s.  It is a double breasted gabardine overcoat, with a mouton collar.  The body is lined in alpaca pile, the sleeves are quilted.  The collar on this one is the nicest I’ve seen, so luxuriously soft.  The shoulders are wide and heavily padded, for that early bold look. There are a few small mothnips on the sleeve, but they’re minor.  The belt is detachable, allowing you to wear it with a full belt, a half belt or no belt at all.
Chest: (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 53″
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The McDorsey Yukon trench coat

This vintage coat was made just post WWII.  It is a double breasted trench coat style, with a mouton sheepskin collar, and a combination alpaca pile and quilted satin lining.  The gabardine shell of the coat is a medium blue color.  There is a detachable belt.  The coat was made by McDorsey Sportswear and is their “Yukon” model. One of the buttons does not match and there is wear to the bottom edge of the quilted liner.
Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Shoulder to Shoulder: 18″
Length (collar to hem): 39″
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