1920s Extra Quality eight pleat flat cap

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400986556489
This vintage cap was made in the 1920s – early 1930s and is marked “Extra Quality”. It is made of heavy mackinaw wool, with a one piece, eight pleat design, herringbone and fur lined earflaps and a snap brim. This type of cap is typical of fall/winter workwear caps of that era, and it is rare to find one in this large size and in wearable condition.

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Atomic flat cap

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400950589816
This vintage cap was made in the late 1950s- mid 1960s. It has a great red, purple and gray midcentury pattern and is tagged a size XL, 7-1/2 – 7-5/8.

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Novelty Automotive print cap

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271221590096
This cap was made in the 1950s. It is a lightweight novelty print, with scenes of turn of the century automobiles, motorists and ads. It has a leather sweatband. The liner is marked ” Gold Medal Award – Exclusively For Good Dressers”. The cap has a one piece top construction. There is a stain on the top.

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1930s cap construction

This cap dates from sometime in the late 1930s through mid 1940s. It is an inexpensive workwear one, with cheap imitation leather sweatband, cracked all to hell from years of sitting in the back room of a shop.

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Because of the condition and small size, I have taken it apart to make a pattern from it. By sometime in the summer, expect to see reproductions based on this 1930s cap for sale. I’m working on other patterns as well, including a one piece, eight dart type cap, also based on a 1930s original.

In keeping with the original $0.50 price of this cap, the brim is made of the finest material- heavy cardboard.
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The eight panels taken apart. The pattern is cut from the material with very little waste.
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The eight panels are sewn together to create the top of the cap. As this is an unlined cap, seam tape is sewn over all the seams for a neater look. The last piece of seam tape is double the length and goes over top all the other pieces, hiding all their edges. A cloth covered button is riveted at the center of the cap, where the eight panels meet. The bottom edge is folded over and sewn with a piece of interfacing to stiffen the opening of the cap.
The brim, in this case cardboard, in other cases rubber or leather, is covered in fabric with a trailing edge. That edge is sewn to the inside of the cap’s opening, and the brim is flipped out. Finally, a sweatband is installed, covering the rough edge of the brim.