1930s Cap Construction Part 2

Continued from Part 1

This was a more expensive cap than the last one. It’s made of a nice heavy tweed, with a pastel purple lining. It was made by the Eastern Cap Company. Whereas the last one was an eight panel cap, this is a flat cap.
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The inside of the cap with lining. The lining is fairly standard. Round top.
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And again without the lining. As you can see- seams are left unfinished. This pattern cap has 9 main components: top, band, brim, brim covering (2 pieces), lining (4 pieces) and all the hardware. Even though this is a more expensive and dressier cap, the brim, as with the last one, is made of heavy cardboard. This one uses a slightly more flexible stock.
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The top panel unfolded.
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1930s cap construction

This cap dates from sometime in the late 1930s through mid 1940s. It is an inexpensive workwear one, with cheap imitation leather sweatband, cracked all to hell from years of sitting in the back room of a shop.

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Because of the condition and small size, I have taken it apart to make a pattern from it. By sometime in the summer, expect to see reproductions based on this 1930s cap for sale. I’m working on other patterns as well, including a one piece, eight dart type cap, also based on a 1930s original.

In keeping with the original $0.50 price of this cap, the brim is made of the finest material- heavy cardboard.
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The eight panels taken apart. The pattern is cut from the material with very little waste.
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The eight panels are sewn together to create the top of the cap. As this is an unlined cap, seam tape is sewn over all the seams for a neater look. The last piece of seam tape is double the length and goes over top all the other pieces, hiding all their edges. A cloth covered button is riveted at the center of the cap, where the eight panels meet. The bottom edge is folded over and sewn with a piece of interfacing to stiffen the opening of the cap.
The brim, in this case cardboard, in other cases rubber or leather, is covered in fabric with a trailing edge. That edge is sewn to the inside of the cap’s opening, and the brim is flipped out. Finally, a sweatband is installed, covering the rough edge of the brim.