Red Head Brand hunting jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272114924793

This vintage jacket was made in the late 1930s by Red Head Brand. It features their convertible collar, which unzips and conceals a split, zip-up hood.  It has large double-round front pockets and a doubled breast pocket.  The game pouch empties with a hook closure and a zip running down the center.  All zippers are Talon, with one of each of their main styles of pulls that were produced at that time, a rectangular pull with small rectangular hole, a bell shaped pull and a round holed Hookless style pull.

 
Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-3/8″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29-1/2″

 

A piece I wrote for my website on the history of Red Head:
E.C. Cook & Bro. was founded in Chicago c.1867 by E.C. Cook (b.1845) and his brother F.W. Cook. They were manufacturers of awnings, tents, waterproof wagon,horse and truck covers, flags, banners and canvas signs. Later they expanded range to include hunters’ and tourists’ outfits, including jackets, cartridge vests, leggings, hats, gun and rifle covers, holsters, belts, cartridge belts, rod cases, and boots.
The Red Head brand name first used 1908. In 1915, a half million dollar contract for boots for the British Army was rejected and the company was forced into bankruptcy. Former employee S. Theodore Anderson, who had been with Cook since 1885 became president of the new Alward Anderson Southard Co, formed along with Charles H. Southard and Edward Hendrickson (with Cook since 1897). The new company took over the closed factory, located at 925 W. Chicago Ave, hired 100 new workers, and resumed production of the defunct Cook’s lines.
In 1931, Theodore Anderson died and the company was taken over by his widow, Alma Anderson. The company grew and flourished under her ownership and management, opening a new factory in 1940 at 4300 Belmont Ave. and expanding employment to over 500.
Anderson died in 1956 and the company was taken over by Clarke F. Hine. Red Head was purchased by the Brunswick Blake Collender Co, of bowling ball fame, in December 1959. Brunswick purchased the DryBak company several years later, selling both company’s similar hunting lines for a time in the 1960s.
In 1970, Red Head Brand was again sold and operations relocated to 4949 Joseph Hardin Dr Dallas, Texas.
The brand is currently owned by Bass Pro shops. They have been marketing Red Head as a “heritage brand”, though they do no market any vintage style products, and put the company’s origin in 1856, a date which has no relation anything.

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Vertical Stripe Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401060646706

This vintage coat was made in the 1960s from English made Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets.  In a departure from the usual way that these blankets are turned into coats, this one has the stripes running vertically, giving it a very mod look. It has 3/4 length sleeves.
Pit to pit: 24-1/2″ (doubled = 49″)
Sleeve (center of collar to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 40

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Army Officer’s trenchcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272115056849

This vintage trench coat was made in 1943 for the US Army.  Officially named the Regularion Army Officer’s Overcoat, Field, this trench is double breasted, with broad lapels, a wide overlap, belted waist, flap at the shoulder, buttoned throat latch under the collar, buttoned cuff adjuster belts, buttonholes at the hem to button back the tails, epaulettes and buttoned handwarmer pockets with pass through slits.  It has a full wool button-in lining.

Tagged size: 38R
Chest (pit to pit): 24-1/2″ (doubled = 49″)
Shoulder to shoulder:19-3/4″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 44-1/2″

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1930s Burberrys overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272109471976

This vintage overcoat was made in the 1930s by Burberrys London It is made of brown wool with a rust colored overcheck.  It has raglan sleeves, a three button front, and buttoned handwarmer pockets with pass through slits.

Chest (pit to pit): 25-1/2″ (doubled = 51″)
Sleeve (center of collar to hem): 35″
Length (base of collar to hem): 43-3/4″

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Hettrick American Field point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272103123979

This vintage coat was made in the late 1940s-1950s by the Hettrick Mfg. Co of Toledo, Ohio under their “American Field” label.  The coat has some striking similarities to the blanket mackinaws made in this era by Congress Sportswear / Maine Guide, including the raw bottom edge and the rounded collar with peak lapels.  The coat is belted, with buttoned adjusters on the sleeves. More in keeping with the mackinaws of the 1930s, this one is made with unlined construction, save for the rayon lined sleeves.
Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

The Hettrick Mfg. Co. was founded in 1893 (or 1891, depending on the source) in Toledo, Ohio as a manufacturer of canvas goods, largely awnings and wagon covers. In 1921, they launched the “American Field” line of hunting garments. A bit of a late comer to the hunting game, they advertised their coats as designed by an “old timer”. Their factory was located at 1401 Summit Street, Toledo, Ohio. Unlike most of the other manufacturers of hunting clothes, Hettrick maintained their other interests after entering the hunting market, producing everything from canvas lawn chairs to tricycles. Hettrick was purchased by the F&M Real Estate Company of Lowell, MA and in 1962, Hettrick closed its Ohio factories and moved to Statesville, NC to take advantage of the lower cost of manufacturing in the south. They moved production into the factory of the Empire Manufacturing Corp, who continued producing their own line from the same plant, with a secondary factory in Pink Hill, NC. It is unclear whether they were purchased by Empire, sources are conflicting. Empire ran a strongly anti-union shop, threatening employees in 1968 who were attempting to unionize. They were sued by employees, the threats were found to be unlawful and the case was used as an example in a Congressional subcommittee on labor. Shortly thereafter, in 1969, American Field was acquired by the Olin Corporation, manufacturer of Winchester rifles. In 1970, the Hettrick divistion acquired the J. W. Johnson Co of Bellwood, Ill and Dickey Oakwood Corp of Oakwood, Ohio. In 1971, Hettrick merged with Comfy Seattle Co and became Trailblazer by Winchester, “managing transactions for Comfy, the Turner Co., Olin Skiis, J.W. Johnson, Dickey Oakwood”, as well as factories in Pink Hill, Statesville and one in Corcoran, California built in 1970. While Hettrick as a company was absorbed, the Hettrick brand continued to be produced, with production shifted to the Pink Hill plant, reflected on labels. By the 1980s, the operation had been sold again, to WeatherShield Sports Equipment, Inc. (founded 1951) at Petoskey Rd. At Mercer Blvd., Charlevoix, MI. They lasted at least into the 1990s.

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1930s Woolrich 503 mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272103134424

This vintage coat was made in the mid-1930s by the Woolrich Woolen Mills of Woolrich, Pennsylvania.  It features the green bordered Woolrich tag used c.1934-c.1936, the United Carr waver pattern with dots snaps used up through the mid ’30s (replaced by a simplified version in the late 1930s and by a plain top snap by the early 1940s), early style buttons and the asymmetrical breast pockets which were replaced post-war with symmetrical ones.  The coat has a mustard colored lining and storm cuffs. The wool used on these earlier production coats is darker in color and heavier in weight than later coats.

Chest (pit to pit):  23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28-1/2″

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m1938 Jeep Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272101292449

This vintage Jeep coat was made during WWII for the US Army.  It is made from green canvas with a brown wool lining and collar.  It has a shawl collar and a double breasted closure, with a throat latch with a wreath style donut button under the collar.

Chest (pit to pit): 22-3/4″  (doubled = 45-1/2″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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Oppenheim Collins mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401051351095

This vintage coat was made in the 1930s and was sold by the New York based department store Oppenheim Collins.  It is double breasted, with cargo pockets and handwarmer pockets featuring scalloped trim. There are buttoned adjuster belts at the cuffs.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 15-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

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Hercules Fieldmaster blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/401051353688

This vintage coat was made in Canada in the 1950s from English made Early’s Witney Point Blanket material and was sold by Sears under their Hercules Fieldmaster label. It has a Milium lining, which, when combined with the incredibly thick blankets used in this make for one of the warmest vintage coats out there.
Tagged size: 38
Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 36-1/2″

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m1938 shawl collar jeep coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272097265712

This vintage m1938 jeep coat was made in 1942 by the Stahl Urban company for the US Army. It is belted, with a wool lining and shawl collar.

Tagged size: 40
Chest (pit to pit): 23-1/2″ (doubled = 47″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 33-1/4″

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