1930s Red Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281399895994
This vintage coat was made c. 1937 from Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets. The coat is a classic late 1930s double breasted mackinaw cut, with flapped patch cargo pockets and slash handwarmers with arrow reinforcement stitching. The back has a scalloped yoke and pleated back. The cuffs have buttoned adjusters. Inside are two different styles of Hudson’s Bay label, which help with the dating.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

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Yellow Point Blanket Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271506036864
This vintage coat was made by the United Colors of Benetton. It is made of striped point blanket material, like that made famous by the Hudson’s Bay blanket coats, but in a vibrant yellow, red, green and gray pattern never offered by the HBC. The collar is backed with corduroy. The coat is single breasted, with patch pockets.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

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1930s Brewster Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281303524987
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in Camden, Maine by the J.A. Brewster company. The company was founded in the 19th century by Jarvis Adelbert Brewster. The company produced high quality outerwear for the harsh Maine winters, with locations in Camden and Freeport Maine. The LL Bean flagship store would later be built at the site of Brewster’s Freeport location. Brewster produced the first run of red wool outdoorsman’s shirts for the Boy Scouts in the 1940s.

This coat was made in the late 1930s. The style is pure function, with an oversized collar to block out harsh winter winds. A throat latch / chinstrap makes sure it stays snug when up. The coat is double breasted, with handwarmer pockets on the chest and patch pockets on the hips. As was the style up through the 1930s, this coat is unlined. To make up for the lack of lining and still retain warmth, these early coats were made of super thick wool. After WWII, when lighter weight coats began to be more popular, quilted linings made up for the lower quality of the shell. This one has some of the thickest wool I’ve seen on this type of coat. The tag position is consistent with the dating- later coats by this maker generally had the tag on the inside by the collar.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (collar to hem): 30″

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Repro Indian Blanket railroad vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281277739940
This vest was made by a company called Maxwear, in the style of a 1930s work vest, similar to the ones made by Brown’s Beach Jacket and the sleeved versions made by Woolrich. It is made of thick wool approximating the pattern of an Indian blanket. It has a five snap front, with patch pockets. The back has adjuster tabs. Snaps have a star design, continuing the western theme started with the material.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Length: 25″

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1960s Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271404687198
This vintage coat was made in the early 1960s by the Hudson’s Bay Company from their iconic multi-stripe point blankets. It is their “Olympic” model, a belted, double breasted style with tab adjusters at the wrists, handwarmer pockets at the chest and patch pockets on the hips. The style was made, essentially unchanged, since the 1920s. Whereas some blanket mackinaws of this style were made using the Hudson’s Bay fabric by other manufacturers, this one was made and sold by Hudson’s Bay themselves. This is the same style and era as was worn by the Canadian Olympic team at the 1964 Innsbruck Winter Olympic games. The stripes on this one are inverted from what most are – usually you see the indigo stripe on the bottom. However, even looking at the photos of the Canadian Olympic team all wearing matching versions of this coat, a percentage have this rarer flipped design. The position of the stripes relative to the features of the coats differ in nearly every coat in those pictures as well. I suppose each cutter had their own way of positioning the pattern. The coat is fully lined, which, along with the particular style of label, distinguish it from earlier manufacture coats.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

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Parker’s western blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281263906903
This vintage jacket was made in the late 1940s or 1950s by Parkers of 200 N. Center Street, Reno, Nevada. It is their Mr. Windsor model. Made from gray wool, it has a black stripe, reminiscent of Hudson’s Bay point blanket coats. Unlike those, however, the stripe is a separate piece of wool. There are fancy western yokes on the front and back, and pleats with contrasting black wool inside to really make them pop. The jacket has peak lapels, square tails, and a full lining.

Tagged Size: 44R
Chest (pit to pit): 24″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

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1940s Maine Guide Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271397856838
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background). The green and black is rare.
The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.
This coat is double breasted and belted, and has a stylish peaked collar that I’ve only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat is unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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Gray Blanket stripe coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281262510170
This vintage jacket was made in the 1970s or 1980s. It closely follows the pattern of Hudson’s Bay point blanket jackets of the time, with its shirt style collar and buttoned patch pockets. However, I don’t believe the Hudson’s Bay Company ever produced their jackets in this period with a gray background. I have seen this pattern of fabric made by Woolrich and by Pendleton, so possibly it’s one of theirs.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 21″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 29″

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Woolrich Indian Blanket Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281244850219
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Woolrich Woolen Mills of Woolrich, Pennsylvania for the Thornton Bay Clothing Company. Made in the 1980s, it is a reproduction of the shawl collared Indian blanket mackinaws made famous in the 1910s by companies like Pendleton and Guiterman / Summit. The coat is double breasted, with a shawl collar. It has both hip pockets and handwarmers. It is belted. The coat is fully lined. The coat is tagged a size medium, but fits more like a size 46 or 48, please refer to the measurements for an accurate fit.

Chest (pit to pit): 26-1/2″ (doubled = 53″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length: 32″

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1946 Albert Richard blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281208760052
This vintage wool jacket was made c. 1946 by Albert Richard. It is interlined with “Spun Sun” fiberglass insulation, pioneered by Albert Richard immediately after WWII. This model coat matches the button front surcoats sold immediately after WWII. This is the early style “Spun Sun” fabric, before the introduction of the (R) symbol in 1947. Albert Richard was sold and relocated in 1952, closing shortly thereafter. This coat has a three button front, a broad collar and two flapped hip pockets. While earlier coats by Albert Richard were made of Hudson’s Bay Company blanket fabric, with the advent of the miracle “Spun Sun” insulation, they could use lighter weight wools from other woolen mills to achieve the same level of warmth. This one has a three stripe pattern, with a broader central stripe.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length: 30″

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