1920s Duxbak vest – size 42

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271278932633
This vintage hunting vest was made in the 1920s. The DuxBak line was started in 1906 by Bird, Jones and Kenyon, and had a factory located at 1 Blandina St., Utica, NY. Prior to the 1920s, Duxbak used the slogan “Duxbak Sportsman’s Clothing” in their advertisements and on their tags. During the 1920s, they switched to ” Duxbak Rain Proof Sportsman’s Clothing”. By the 1930s, they had changed their label to include a graphic of a hunter, and to emphasize “Utica”.

This shell vest design changed very little from when it was introduced in the early 1900s until this one was produced. As it was a garment of pure function, it was not beholden to the whims of fashion. A good design was a good design, and they stuck with it. It has loops for 32 shotgun shells on the front and 16 on the back, for a total of 48. The loops have a canvas top and an early rubber elastic bottom. They are of an open bottomed design, and have leather reinforcement tabs at the end of each row of loops. The vest has a five button front and all buttons bear the duxbak name. This vest was sold originally by the Ambrose Sporting Goods Co., which was located at 132 South Main Street, Memphis, TN. The company seems to have had their peak in the late 1920s, although they did make it through the depression.

Tagged Size:
Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Length (neck to hem down back):19-1/2″

 photo IMG_0001.jpg

 photo IMG_0002-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0005.jpg

 photo IMG_0006-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0008-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0011-1.jpg

 photo invoice.jpg

 photo 190601Stitch.jpg

 photo T2eC16dHJIIE9qTYLiHrBRduFnYUVQ60_57.jpg

 photo 1928ambrose.jpeg

Advertisements

1930s Woolrich hunting coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271277514189

This is a rare early variant of the classic Woolrich hunting coat. Most Woolrich coats you see are from the 1950s or 1960s. Coats of that era have snaps withe the “Woolrich” name on them. They have labels with a slimmed down sheep and a (R) registered trademark symbol in the corner. This one dates from the late 1930s, and has a number of details which differentiate it from the later, more common versions. The pocket snaps on this one are of the style used in the 1930s and before, with a meander pattern encircled by dots. The label is of the style used from the mid-late 1930s, with a blocky sheep, green text and a green border. Woolrich was an early adopter of zippers on their hunting garments. This one has twin double-marked Talon zippers on the game pocket. This is the style used in the late ’30s- early 1940s, with a beveled edge puller with a small hole, the Talon name on the component which attaches the slider to the puller, and the full “Made in U.S.A.” text on the back of the slider. By the 1940s, Woolrich had abandoned the use of zippers on their game pockets, in favor of a simpler and more easily repaired (though less secure) single button. With purely functional workwear and hunting items such as this, they were passed down for generations and worn hard, as there was no regard for changing styles, and a deer is unlikely to call the fashion police. The coat has a fair bit of mothing to the shell, but is in better shape than most I’ve seen from this era. Although there is some, there is also much less wear and staining than usually seen to the liner, the neck and the cuffs, the areas generally most heavily hit.

Tagged size: 42
Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length: 30″

 photo IMG_0002.jpg

 photo IMG_0004.jpg

 photo IMG_0041.jpg

 photo IMG_0043.jpg

 photo IMG_0045.jpg

 photo IMG_0046.jpg

 photo IMG_0047.jpg

 photo IMG_0048.jpg

 photo IMG_0052.jpg

1930s American Field hunting jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281168068268
This vintage coat was made in the late 1930s by the Hettrick Mfg. Co. of Toldeo, Ohio. This was their signature model, the “Gun Coat”, with “free swing” shoulders, a corduroy collar and cuffs, roughout horsehide shoulder reinforcement, a gun pad on the right shoulder, large pockets, and an interior game pocket. The water-resistant game pocket does up with bell shaped Talon zippers. At the end of the listing are a couple of ads for this model of coat, dating from 1936 and from 1940.

Chest (pit to pit): 23-1/2″ (doubled = 47″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-3/4″
Length: 28″

 photo IMG_0053.jpg

 photo IMG_0054.jpg

 photo IMG_0055.jpg

 photo IMG_0056.jpg

 photo IMG_0057.jpg

 photo IMG_0058.jpg

 photo IMG_0059.jpg

 photo IMG_0060.jpg

 photo 193615Stitch-Copy.jpg

 photo 194006Stitch-Copy.jpg

New Jersey Frozen Foods custom leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271277523946
This vintage leather jacket was made in the 1950s. It has a classic casual cut, sportcoat length. The jacket has a scaloped yoke on the back, which, along with the horseshoe belt buckle give the jacket an under-the-radar western vibe. The jacket has a button-on belt. Many jackets of this length from the 1930s-1950s had button on belts like this, but lost them over the years, it’s uncommon to find one still paired with the belt. There are two breast pockets which fasten with Conmar chain zippers. The main zipper is also a Conmar. The jacket’s label reads “Custom Made Deerskin Sportswear, New Jersey Frozen Foods, Inc., Morristown, NJ”. Somewhat of an unusual firm to be making leather jackets, but similarity to other leather jacket maker’s patterns make me think that it was produced by a third party factory, probably one of the Wisconsin deerskin jacket factories and sold by NJFF. The jacket is fully lined, with a material change about half-way down.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff):25-12″
Length: 32″

 photo IMG_0061.jpg

 photo IMG_0062.jpg

 photo IMG_0063.jpg

 photo IMG_0064.jpg

 photo IMG_0065.jpg

 photo IMG_0067.jpg

 photo IMG_0070.jpg

 photo IMG_0072.jpg

 photo IMG_0074.jpg

JC Penney straw cowboy hat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271278326127
This vintage straw hat was made in the late 1960s- 1970s and was sold by JC Penney. Penney’s was known for their hats, formerly retailing their store brand “Marathon” hats. This one is made simply under the JCPenney label. It is made of straw with an open weave, and blocked with a squared off cattleman’s crease. The sweatband, as was the case of many straw hats of the period, is an imitation leather, and has hardened, but is still in solid condition, with no cracking. The hat looks like it was barely ever worn, a rarity for straws like this.

Size: 7-1/8
Brim Width: 3-1/4″

 photo IMG_0025.jpg

 photo IMG_0026.jpg

 photo IMG_0027.jpg

 photo IMG_0028.jpg

 photo IMG_0029.jpg

Bailey B Bar B Cowboy Hat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271274160936
This vintage cowboy hat was made in the mid to late 1950s by Bailey hats under their “B Bar B” western line. It is made of high quality 3X fur felt. Please remember that the X rating system has inflated grossly over the past half-century, and varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. This is very nice felt. It is trimmed with a two cord band, and has a raw edge brim. The hat has a brown leather sweatband, stamped with the Bailey logo. It was sold in Bozeman, Montana by Wagner’s.

Size: 7-1/8
Brim Width: 3-1/2″
Crown Height: 5-3/4″

 photo IMG_0018.jpg

 photo IMG_0019.jpg

 photo IMG_0020.jpg

 photo IMG_0021.jpg

 photo IMG_0022.jpg

 photo IMG_0023.jpg

 photo IMG_0024.jpg