Original Perry A-2 horsehide flight jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271501781667
This vintage leather flight jacket was made by the Perry Sportswear company of Newburgh, New York. It is made of horsehide leather. The jacket has a pinlock Conmar zipper, United Carr ball-style snaps and grommets under the arms. The pockets have square reinforcement stitching, rounded corners, and shallowly scalloped pocket flaps. The arm has some period artwork on it for the 5th Air Corps. Unlike most, which were painted, this one is branded onto the leather.

Chest (pit to pit): 41″
Shoulder to shoulder: 17-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 20-1/2″ (missing knit cuffs, so will be longer once replaced)
Length (base of collar to end of waistband): 23-1/2″

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Chinstrap WWII Army Shirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281298794445
This vintage shirt was made in the 1940s. it has two chest pockets one with a pencil pocket, double button cuffs and epaulettes. It has a chinstrap collar stand, a detail common on workshirts of the 1920s-1930s. The maker of this shirt likely was primarily a maker of those workshirts before being awarded the contract to make this one for the Army.

Collar: 15-1/2″
Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 31″

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WWII Richmond Bros. shawl mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271397626926
This vintage Officer’s Short Overcoat / Shawl Collar Mackinaw was made in 1942 by high-end clothier Richman Brothers under contract for the US Army. This style coat was a direct descendant of the shawl collar workwear mackinaws of the 1910s-1930s, and from the m-1926 mackinaw worn by the Army and the Civilian Conservation Corps before the war. It is a double breasted style, with a broad shawl collar, epaulettes, and a belted waist. The coat is fully lined with an interior breast pocket.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 33″

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m1926 army Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271371253018
This vintage coat is an extremely rare pre-war m-1926 army mackinaw (short overcoat). It is double breasted, with a wide shawl collar and large flapped patch pockets. As was typical of early shawl collared mackinaw coats, both military and civilian, it is unlined. The updated version of this coat issued in WWII featured a lining. This pre-war pattern was commonly seen on Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees. Based on the 43″ chest measurement, this would fit best in the 36 to 38 size range.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 33″

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WWII Doeskin Army Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271371265923
This vintage army mackinaw was made in 1942. It is made of doeskin wool in a double breasted, shawl collared, belted mackinaw style. The spec tag identifies the official name as the Officer’s Short Overcoat, and the size as a 38 Long. One of the buttons on the belt is missing, but replacements for this model coat are easily found.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 34″

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m1938 Jeep Coat Army Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271370848434
This vintage coat is an m1938 jeep coat, issued during WWII. The style descends from sheeplined canvas work coats and shawl collared mackinaws of the 1910s-1930s. It has a cotton shell and a wool lining. The coat has a double breasted front and a wide wool faced shawl collar. It is belted. There is a buttoned throat latch under the collar to secure it in cold weather, fastened with a riveted “wreath” button. Patches identify the original owner as a technical sergeant in the Army Service Forces.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length: 31-1/2″

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Mid 1940s Albert Richard leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271352480738
This vintage leather jacket was made by Albert Richard in the mid 1940s. It is made of “Chevro-Kid” goatskin. This trade name was typical of Albert Richards’s naming schemes during WWII and shortly after, playing of military terminology. The company could back this up- they produced flight jackets for the army and navy during the war. This jacket is made of the same goatskin used for these Navy flight jacket contracts. The jacket is a hip length style, with flapped saddlebag patch pockets , a straight yoke on the front, and a plain back. It was originally belted, but as with many jackets of this style, the belt is long since missing. The zipper is a Talon, with a mid 1940s stopbox and a slightly earlier style slider (these combinations were common at this period). The zipper is attached in the “surcoat” style, , where the end of the zip is attached to a triangle of leather which is free from the front of the jacket.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length: 29-1/2″

A bit about Albert Richard, from an article I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”.
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south. Production was low, and this new plant closed almost as soon as it opened.

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Mid 1940s Woolrich Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281204865336
This vintage Woolrich coat was made in the mid 1940s in Woolrich, Pennsylvania. After extensive research and collecting, I have put together a comprehensive guide to dating the labels and details of these coats. This style label, with a skinny sheep, was used in the later days of WWII through until about 1947. After 1947, the logo was changed with a new design of sheep, and to include the (R) symbol. Still produced today, this model of Woolrich mackinaw has changed very little since the turn of the last century, so details must be relied upon to give accurate dating. The label is the big one, definitively pinning it down to the mid 1940s. The jacket features the early style asymmetric breast pockets. Woolrich switched over to two large breast pockets in the 1960s. This coat has a rarely seen style of snap for this type of coat, a plain design made by United Carr, used during the war years, transitional between the pre-war “meander” style and the post-war ones branded with the Woolrich name.

The coat has a large, rounded collar with a buttoned throat latch. It has covered buttons save for the top. All the pockets have snaps. The vertical pockets on the front pass through to the internal game pouch, which can also be accessed from the rear. The coat has a full mustard colored lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 29″

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Battered A-2

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281204190634
This vintage A-2 leather flight jacket was made during the 1940s. It has a spring-loaded zipper introduced in 1943 by Crown. This type, with “two-way” teeth, was designed exclusively for the military with larger versions finding their way onto the turrets of bombers to keep the wind out. Featuring this late-war military zipper, the jacket may have been private purchase. Snaps are of a ball style, and were made by Rau of Providence, Rhode Island, and have exposed backs. Pockets have nicely scalloped flaps, with the size tag stitched on the inside. The collar is long and pointed, and is attached directly to the body of the jacket The leather jacket hanger is off-center, stitched with “X” style stitching. The jacket has a khaki liner, which is in very good shape. Unfortunately, the original tag is long since missing.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to end of knit cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to end of knit cuff): 23″

Also see: http://vintagehaberdashers.com/2013/03/08/original-a2-leather-jacket/

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Soo Woolen Mills plaid surcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281198324999
This vintage plaid mackinaw coat was made by the Soo Woolen Mills of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan immediately after WWII. It has a surcoat zipper attachment and length. The main zipper is a rare transitional talon- with a Talon marked stop box of the type used in the mid-late 1940s. The main zip has a square sided, square holed puller, a type used very briefly as they were transitioning between the square edged pullers with a small hole and round ended pullers with a larger hole. The pockets zip with bell shaped, round holed Conmar zippers. The overall cut of the coat is interesting, with its long rear pleat topped with triangle reinforcing stitching and a belted, buttoned back. Most plaid mackinaws were of very traditional designs which changed very little over the years. This particular Soo model was very modern and sport for the time it was made. It is lined in red flannel, and is marked young adult age/size 20, which going by the measurements, is about a men’s size 44 short.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length: 28″

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