1930s Wool men’s Malibu swimsuit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271463856636
This vintage swimsuit was made in the late 1930s by Malibu. It is made of burgundy wool, with a false fly and a key/coin pocket with a buttoned, scalloped flap. The sides are double piped with yellow wool, there is a diamond shaped crotch gusset for a more comfortable fit, and the suit has a yellow textured web belt with a fancy buckle. The brand was named after Malibu beach, and advertised it as “The Beach of the Stars”, a clever way to associate itself with the Hollywood elite without necessarily having any of them as endorsers.

Tagged size: 36
Waist (unstretched): 14″ (doubled = 28″)
Waist (Stretched): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Side seam: 12″
Rise: 15-1/2″

 photo IMG_0661.jpg

 photo IMG_0664.jpg

 photo IMG_0670.jpg

 photo IMG_0671.jpg

 photo IMG_0672.jpg

 photo IMG_0674.jpg

 photo IMG_0675.jpg

 photo IMG_0676.jpg

 photo IMG_0679.jpg

Chinstrap WWII Army Shirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281298794445
This vintage shirt was made in the 1940s. it has two chest pockets one with a pencil pocket, double button cuffs and epaulettes. It has a chinstrap collar stand, a detail common on workshirts of the 1920s-1930s. The maker of this shirt likely was primarily a maker of those workshirts before being awarded the contract to make this one for the Army.

Collar: 15-1/2″
Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 31″

 photo IMG_0268.jpg

 photo IMG_0269.jpg

 photo IMG_0270.jpg

 photo IMG_0274.jpg

 photo IMG_0275.jpg

 photo IMG_0279.jpg

 photo IMG_0280.jpg

 photo IMG_0281.jpg

1930s Big Yank chinstrap workshirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271435207029
This vintage workshirt was made by famed workwear manufacturer, Big Yank, in the 1930s. The shirt has an extended, double button collar stand, now known as a chinstrap. There are two spacious, flapped breast pockets. Seams are triple stitched. Shoulders are reinforced, as are the elbows. The tails are gusseted. The blue chambray versions of this style were popular in the summer, while wool versions, like this one, were worn in the winter. There is the remains of a Dewitt Clinton Cigarette tax stamp in one of the pockets, possibly series 108 from 1938

Tagged size: 16-1/2
Collar: 16-1/2″
Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29-1/2″

 photo IMG_0213.jpg

 photo IMG_0209.jpg

 photo IMG_0210.jpg

 photo IMG_0212.jpg

 photo IMG_0214.jpg

 photo IMG_0216.jpg

 photo IMG_0217.jpg

 photo IMG_0218.jpg

 photo IMG_0220.jpg

 photo IMG_0221.jpg

 photo IMG_0222.jpg

 photo IMG_0223.jpg

 photo 192201.jpg

 photo 192301.jpg

 photo 192801.jpg

 photo 05.jpg

WWI US Navy Peacoat repro

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271423315528
This peacoat was made by Ralph Lauren and is a reproduction of the model worn in WWI. It has a ten button front, with both handwarmer and flapped cargo pockets. There is a short vent in the rear. The pockets are lined in corduroy. Buttons are reproductions of the 13 star buttons used on WWI coats, with the addition of the RL. The coat is fully lined, with two interior pockets.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length: 32″

 photo IMG_0003-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0004-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0005-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0006-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0008.jpg

 photo IMG_0012-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0013-1.jpg

Early 1930s Woolrich 503 Mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271423336178
This vintage hunting coat was made in Woolrich, Pennsylvania in the early 1930s by John Rich / Woolrich Woolen Mills. The 503 style hunting coat as been around with relatively few changes for the better part of a century, but the details make it easy to date. This is the earliest version of this coat I have seen.

While many Woolrich labels look relatively similar in isolation, the company changed their design every few years. This label was used in the very early 1930s. See the dating guide I have put together at the end of the auction. The snaps in this coat are by United Carr, and are a design only used from about 1930-1934. The top of the snap, with its line design, was used by Woolrich until about 1940. They switched to plain headed snaps during WWII, then to Woolrich branded snaps after the war. These early coats have asymmetrical breast pockets, while starting in the late 1950s, Woolrich switched to matching breast pockets. The brown buttons on this early coat are nicer than the red bakelite buttons which Woolrich began to use in the mid 1930s, which has a tendency to craze and crack over time.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

 photo IMG_0014-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0016-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0030.jpg

 photo IMG_0031.jpg

 photo IMG_0017-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0023-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0025-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0033-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0034-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0035-1.jpg

 photo sheep.jpg

 photo snaps.jpg

1920s hookless zipper front pullover Hudson’s Bay jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271422243118
This vintage jacket was made in the 1920s. It was tailored from Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, at the time, one of the most expensive wools on the market, prized for its warmth and vibrant colors.
The jacket is a pullover style, with an A-1 style knit waistband. The separable-bottomed zipper was not introduced by Hookless/Talon until 1930. Prior to that point, if a manufacturer wanted a zip-front to a jacket, it had to be closed-bottomed, which meant a pullover style. This zipper is an extremely rare early Hookless, dating to the 1920s. It has a bent wire pull, probably meant for a leather pull attachment. This design pre-dated the grommet-zipper by a good five years or more.
It has a shirt style collar, with a long chinstrap, a detail borrowed from work clothing. The opening of the zipper has a layer of wool behind it to keep anything from becoming snagged in the teeth of the zipper. The Hudson’s Bay Company label bears the logo used in the 1920s, pre-dating the inclusion of registration numbers in the late 1920s.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 21″ (Replacement of missing cuffs would probably bring length to 24-25″)
Length: 27″

 photo IMG_0119.jpg

 photo IMG_0120.jpg

 photo IMG_0001.jpg

 photo IMG_0121.jpg

 photo IMG_0123.jpg

 photo IMG_0125.jpg

 photo IMG_0131.jpg

 photo IMG_0126.jpg

 photo IMG_0133.jpg

 photo IMG_0128.jpg

 photo IMG_0130.jpg

1941 Jacob Siegel Co. Army Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281268073559
This vintage Officer’s Short Overcoat / Shawl Collar Mackinaw was made in 1941 by the Jacob Siegel Company under contract for the US Army. This style coat was a direct descendant of the shawl collar workwear mackinaws of the 1910s-1930s, and from the m-1926 mackinaw worn by the Army and the Civilian Conservation Corps before the war. It is a double breasted style, with a broad shawl collar, epaulettes, and a belted waist. The coat is fully lined with an interior breast pocket. There are stitch marks on the sleeves from a six pointed star patch and a round patch.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

 photo IMG_0189.jpg

 photo IMG_0190.jpg

 photo IMG_0192.jpg

 photo IMG_0193.jpg

 photo IMG_0194.jpg

 photo IMG_0196.jpg

 photo IMG_0198.jpg

1947 Ferguson and Allison overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271398557022
This vintage overcoat was tailored in May of 1947 by Ferguson & Allison of 1110 Grand Avenue, Kansas City, MO. It is made of brown herringbone wool, and has a double breasted cut, with caramel colored buttons and sleeve cuffs. It is fully lined, with a great pattern to the lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 43″

 photo IMG_1356.jpg

 photo IMG_1357.jpg

 photo IMG_1358.jpg

 photo IMG_1359.jpg

 photo IMG_1360.jpg

 photo IMG_1362.jpg

 photo IMG_1363.jpg

 photo IMG_1364.jpg

1920s / 1930s Olympic Cap

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271397653107
This vintage cap was made by Knox hats in the late 1920s or early 1930s as part of the uniform of the United States Olympic team. It’s difficult to say with 100% certainty, but this looks consistent with what was worn at either the 1928 St. Moritz or the 1932 Lake Placid games. It is made from white felt in a traditional flat-cap style, with an embroidered US Olympic shield crest consistent with the early games. The cap has a cream colored leather sweatband of the type typical of the late 1920s and early 1930s. The deep embossing is also typical of what Knox was producing in this era. The style of brim is something I have never seen before. Usually the brim on these flat caps is a separate piece, usually with a snap on the top. This is interfaced inside for a degree of stiffness, then decoratively stitched, presumably so that the cap can be rolled up and stowed easily. There is a remnant of the original size tag, but not enough to tell the size. The sweatband measures 22″ in circumference.

 photo IMG_0157.jpg

 photo IMG_0158.jpg

 photo IMG_0162.jpg

 photo IMG_0163.jpg

 photo IMG_0164.jpg

 photo IMG_0165.jpg

 photo 1932LakePlacidUSAori.jpg

R.H. Macy 1930s plaid workshirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281262488148
This vintage plaid wool workshirt was made in the early 1930s and was sold by R.H. Macy & Co., Inc. They later simplified their name to Macy’s. The design of the shirt, in particular the distinctive pocket flaps, are consistent with what was being produced by LL Bean at the time. It’s likely they had the contract for this Macy’s store labeled shirt.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″
Collar: 16″

 photo IMG_0048.jpg

 photo IMG_0050.jpg

 photo IMG_0047.jpg

 photo IMG_0052.jpg

 photo IMG_0055.jpg

 photo IMG_0056.jpg

 photo IMG_0057.jpg