1950s Buco J-24 horsehide leather motorcycle jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271935645735
This vintage jacket was made in the early 1950s in Detroit, Michigan by the Joseph Buegeleisen Company (Buco) out of horsehide. It is their J-24 D-Pocket model motorcycle jacket. From the style of stop box on the main zipper, with its wide ribs, but without the Talon name, this one was made between about 1952 and 1957. The jacket has a D-pocket map pocket with a rounded cornered cigarette pocket. It has zipped sleeves, snapped lapels, snapped belt loops for an external belt, bars on the epaulettes, zippered side storage, a handwarmer pocket, and bi-swing shoulders. At some point, it appears the original owner either broke the main zipper or gained weight, and added snaps, which are offset from the original zip position.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 23-1/2″

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1930s Buegeleisen Eaglet Helmet blue

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400937745429
Strauss & Buegeleisen was founded in 1910 by Elias Buegeleisen of New York, and produced shatterproof aviators goggles under the Resistal name. Younger brother Joseph Buegeleisen and David Buegeleisen joined the company, with J. heading up sales in the Detroit area and D. as the West Coast representative. Joseph split from the family business around 1937 to found what would become Buco. D. Buegeleisen split slightly earlier and began production of these Eaglet helmets, marketed, like the other related family businesses, to the aviation and motorcycle markets. This cap has a navy blue cotton twill shell with a leather lining and trim. It has leather straps to hold on goggles with early style branded snaps. This one is tagged a size Medium and measures 20-1/2″ in circumference.

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1930s D. Buegeleisen Eaglet helmet

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271901808372
Strauss & Buegeleisen was founded in 1910 by Elias Buegeleisen of New York, and produced shatterproof aviators goggles under the Resistal name. Younger brother Joseph Buegeleisen and David Buegeleisen joined the company, with J. heading up sales in the Detroit area and D. as the West Coast representative. Joseph split from the family business around 1937 to found what would become Buco. D. Buegeleisen split slightly earlier and began production of these Eaglet helmets, marketed, like the other related family businesses, to the aviation and motorcycle markets. This cap has a khaki cotton twill shell with a leather lining and trim. It has leather straps to hold on goggles with early style branded snaps. This one is tagged a size Small and measures 20″ in circumference.

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1950s Allsports Supply Co jersey

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271885829671
This vintage jersey was made in the 1950s in Great Falls Montana by the Allsports Supply Co for the Palmer Construction Company. It is two tone red and white with raglan sleeves and a chainstitched felt patch on the chest.

Chest (pit to pit): 19″ (doubled = 38″)
Chest (pit to pit, stretched): 25″ (doubled = 50″)

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1930s Albert Richard Grizzly jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281655706660

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This vintage jacket was made in Milwaukee, Wisconsin by Fried Ostermann between 1936 and 1938 under the Albert Richard Sportswear label. The jacket is made of front quarter horsehide leather, with mouton panels and collar. Originally sold as a “Laskinlamb jacket”, this style has come to be known by collectors as the Grizzly. These were popular in the mid to late 1930. The jacket has Albert Richard’s patented Tu-Length cuffs, which have buttons on either side, allowing them to be worn down for a longer sleeve or turned up and buttoned for a shorter sleeve length. The jacket has a Talon main zipper with a grommet style stopbox. The slider is of the deco sunburst design with oval slider-to-puller connection, which was only produced in the mid 1930s and which was replaced by a simpler design around 1938. The pull is a rectangular holed, plain backed version, also typical of mid 1930s production. The jacket is lined with plaid wool, with leather pit guards and ventilation grommets. The sleeves have knit storm cuffs to keep out the wind. The collar has a buttoned chinstrap throat latch to cinch it up tight in bad weather.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff, turned down): 26″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff, turned up): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 21-1/2″

A history of Albert Richard which I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”:
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI.
Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company.
Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes.
850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

1920s Shawl Collar horsehide leather barnstormer jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271790736078
This vintage leather coat was made in the 1920s-early 1930s. It is made of black horsehide leather, worn to reveal brown tones and incredible grain. It has a broad brown mouton shawl collar. The coat is single breasted, with handwarmer pockets and flapped hip pockets. The coat has an original wool lining, with nylon on the back and sleeves, probably to replace a worn lining. There are storm cuffs under the buttoned cuffs to keep the wind out. These hip length shawl collar coats were popular in the early days of motorcycling and aviation.

Chest (pit to pit) 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 22″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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