Jay Bar Are halfbelt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281287612435
This vintage jacket was made by Jay-Bar-Are brand. It is made of wool gabardine in a half-belt style.Despite the western brand name, the style itself is essentially a fabric version of the horsehide leather jackets of the 1930s and 1940s. The back is belted, with a center pleat. The pleat has an arrowhead reinforcement stitching detail at its top. There are side adjuster belts with D-rings. The front has handwarmer pockets and a zipped breast pocket. The zippers are all rare Waldes brand, they style produced in the late 1930s and early 1940s.

Staining to lining. Missing second buttons on cuffs. Male zipper tape missing prong and should probably be replaced. Moth bites and wear, concentrated under left arm and on front of jacket by the zipper. See photos

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 25″

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1950s German Leather Overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281263975843
This vintage leather overcoat was made in Germany in the 1950s. It is made from heavy russet brown leather- probably steerhide. It has yoked shoulders, a buttonless double breasted front, slash handwarmers, zipper pockets on the chest, and a zipper pocket behind the lapel. All zippers are riri. The coat has a full plaid lining and an intenal snap fastening belt. The back of the coat has a nice double inverted (non-functional) pleat sunburst design.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 47″

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Deadstock mid 1930s Talon Fantail Zippers

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281262585415
This rare vintage zipper was produced by Talon from the early to mid 1930s. In their advertising, this style was the style 110, while the slightly larger version was known as the style 109. The last photo shows a 110 and a 109 side by side for size comparison purposes. It is a pin lock style, with D-shaped stops at the top. According to original advertisements, these were sold with white cotton tape so that they could be dyed to match. These are a closed end, open top style, perfect for sleeve openings on motorcycle jackets and the like. The zipper track measures 3″, while the tape from end to end measures 4-1/2″.

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Mid 1930s half-belt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271391483127
This vintage leather jacket was made in the mid 1930, probably in Wisconsin judging by the materials and construction. It is an early half-belt / cossack style. It can be dated to this point both by style and by hardware. By style: In the late 1920s and early 1930s, a full leather waistband was prevalent. The fancy belted back started to gain traction in the mid 1930s, but the front still retained the bottom panels found on this jacket. By the end of the 1930s, most makers had abandoned these panels for a cleaner look. Stylistically this dates from that middle period. By hardware: The full length separable zipper was first found on jackets made 1930. The “sunburst” deco Talon stopbox found on this jacket joined the riveted style stopbox around the midpoint of the decade, eventually supplanting it in Talon’s product line, before disappearing itself in the early 1940s. So that narrows the date down between about 1935 and 1942. The snaps are made by United Carr. These are of a style which I have not seen on anything beyond the mid 1930s, with the spring section of the fastener appearing on the male side of the snap.
This jacket has been worn extremely hard. The cuffs and collar have been worn through, and a hole has been worn through on the side. That was repaired what looks like some decades ago, but the repair has worn out as well. The lining is missing, and the zipper is missing both the slider and the bottom couple inches of the teeth and tape on the male side. There is paint on the skirt beneath the belt.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 26″

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Mid 1940s Albert Richard leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271352480738
This vintage leather jacket was made by Albert Richard in the mid 1940s. It is made of “Chevro-Kid” goatskin. This trade name was typical of Albert Richards’s naming schemes during WWII and shortly after, playing of military terminology. The company could back this up- they produced flight jackets for the army and navy during the war. This jacket is made of the same goatskin used for these Navy flight jacket contracts. The jacket is a hip length style, with flapped saddlebag patch pockets , a straight yoke on the front, and a plain back. It was originally belted, but as with many jackets of this style, the belt is long since missing. The zipper is a Talon, with a mid 1940s stopbox and a slightly earlier style slider (these combinations were common at this period). The zipper is attached in the “surcoat” style, , where the end of the zip is attached to a triangle of leather which is free from the front of the jacket.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length: 29-1/2″

A bit about Albert Richard, from an article I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”.
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south. Production was low, and this new plant closed almost as soon as it opened.

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Sears Oakbrook D-Pocket leather motorcycle jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271351691584

This vintage leather jacket was made in the 1960s by Sears under the Oakbrook Sportswear tag. This style was around for a while, with very little change made other than the label and zippers. 1950s models made under the Sears Fieldmaster label. It is made of black steerhide. It has a large D-Pocket (also known as a pistol pocket), with a smaller cigarette pocket. The other side has a zippered handwarmer. The lapels have exposed snaps, while the collar has concealed ones. The sleeves zip with Serval zippers, while the main is a large gauge Talon. There is a zipper on the collar, presumably for a zip-on mouton collar. The front of the jacket has an attached belt. It has a yoked back, bi-swing shoulders, and spotwork on the kidney panel. Pocket flaps are lined with black corduroy. The coat has a quilted red lining, with black corduroy trim on the pockets and the hem.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length: 23-1/2″

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Canadian D-Pocket Motorcycle Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271351711041
This vintage leather jacket was made in Canada. It’s hard to say whether this was made by Brimaco or by Shields/Score Sportswear, as their patterns were so similar, and this one is missing the labels. Both manufacturers jackets were made as copies of the 1940s “Cycle Champ” jacket sold by Harley Davidson. While Harley retired the model, going with more of a Perfecto style, these Canadian manufacturers continued production with very little changes. It has a large patch D-pocket, with a smaller patch cigarette pocket. The other side of the jacket has a flapped square patch pocket. The ends of the pocket openings are all reinforced with domed bar studwork for that early motorcycle jacket flash. The back design, with kidney panel is more typical for the Score/Shields jackets, while Brimaco/British Cycle Leathers/British Sportswear jackets generally had three panels in a V shape. But you do see both designs coming from both makers, so it’s doesn’t clear it up that much. This has the smooth nylon lining more commonly seen on the cafe racers made by these companies, while the more old-fashioned plaid linings were generally put into the D-Pocket models. The main zip is a Lightning, the pocket zip is a Canadian Talon of the same design (same company).

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Waist: 29″ (doubled = 36″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length: 22″

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For reference, also see:

Padded CHP leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271233323658
This leather jacket is made in the “Columbia” style, pioneered by Langlitz leathers. This style is also known as the CHP / California Highway Patrol. This particular one was sold by “Leather Man”, and is a size 50. It has quilted, padded shoulders and elbows, an asymmetric zip, and zip cuffs with sheepskin storm cuffs. This is made of extremely heavyweight leather.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Waist: 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem, down back): 22-1/2″

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