1930s Albert Richard Grizzly jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281655706660

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This vintage jacket was made in Milwaukee, Wisconsin by Fried Ostermann between 1936 and 1938 under the Albert Richard Sportswear label. The jacket is made of front quarter horsehide leather, with mouton panels and collar. Originally sold as a “Laskinlamb jacket”, this style has come to be known by collectors as the Grizzly. These were popular in the mid to late 1930. The jacket has Albert Richard’s patented Tu-Length cuffs, which have buttons on either side, allowing them to be worn down for a longer sleeve or turned up and buttoned for a shorter sleeve length. The jacket has a Talon main zipper with a grommet style stopbox. The slider is of the deco sunburst design with oval slider-to-puller connection, which was only produced in the mid 1930s and which was replaced by a simpler design around 1938. The pull is a rectangular holed, plain backed version, also typical of mid 1930s production. The jacket is lined with plaid wool, with leather pit guards and ventilation grommets. The sleeves have knit storm cuffs to keep out the wind. The collar has a buttoned chinstrap throat latch to cinch it up tight in bad weather.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff, turned down): 26″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff, turned up): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 21-1/2″

A history of Albert Richard which I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”:
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI.
Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company.
Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes.
850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

1930s shawl collar leather barnstormer coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271820768421
This vintage leather coat was made in the 1930s. It is double breasted, with a mouton collar, leather knot style buttons, fancy buttoned cuffs, handwarmer and flapped cargo pockets with arrow stitched reinforcements, and a covered curly sheepskin lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1950s All Weather Garment goatskin bomber jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271820684029
This vintage jacket was made in California in the early 1950s from imported Goat Skin. It was made by All Weather Garment. The jacket is made in a post-war “bomber jacket” style, which takes elements of the A-2 flight jacket and melds them with other pre-war civilian styles to make something new. The jacket has patch pockets with scalloped pocket flaps and angled corners, epaulettes, a shirt style collar, knit cuffs and waistband and a Talon zipper of the style only used in the early 1950s, with the unmarked wide rib stopbox and square hole slider. The jacket has a quilted liner. With a 54″ chest, this would best fit someone who wears a 48-50 long. These early jackets are difficult to find in these larger sizes, especially in such an excellent state of preservation.

Chest (pit to pit): 27″ (doubled = 54″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to end of knit): 27″
Length (base of collar to end of waistband): 26-1/2″

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1950s Sears Hercules shawl collar sheeplined coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281636830152
This vintage coat was made in the 1950s for Sears Roebuck and Co under their Fieldmaster outerwear label. The coat is made of cotton canvas, with a 3/4 sheepskin lining, brown mouton collar, full belt and quilted sleeve linings. It has leather reinforcements at the corners of the handwarmer and flapped hip pockets, and loop closure for the buttons.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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Japanese reproduction 1930s Joe McCoy horsehide halfbelt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281632536165
This jacket was made in Japan by high-end vintage repro company, Real McCoys under the Joe McCoy & Co. Leather Clothing Sportswear label. Though made in Japan, for authenticity to original 1930s jackets, the label reads, “styled and tailored in Buffalo, NY”. The plaid lined pocketbag bears the union label of the now defunct United Garment Workers of America. It is made from black front quarter horsehide. The jacket is a 1930s cossack style, with a pleated, belted back, bi-swing shoulders, d-ring side adjuster belts, deco buttons, a Talon zipper with deco stopbox, pin-lock slider and reinforcement grommets, and a Talon marked ball zipper on the breast pocket. Although the tape, teeth and slider are all in excellent condition, the slider won’t currently engage the teeth. The jacket has a burgundy lining. This jacket, though a few seasons old, is very close to McCoy’s current “Steinbeck” model, which retails for 194,000 yen, roughly equivalent to $1600 USD.

Chest (pit to pit): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 21″

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1920s Shawl Collar horsehide leather barnstormer jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271790736078
This vintage leather coat was made in the 1920s-early 1930s. It is made of black horsehide leather, worn to reveal brown tones and incredible grain. It has a broad brown mouton shawl collar. The coat is single breasted, with handwarmer pockets and flapped hip pockets. The coat has an original wool lining, with nylon on the back and sleeves, probably to replace a worn lining. There are storm cuffs under the buttoned cuffs to keep the wind out. These hip length shawl collar coats were popular in the early days of motorcycling and aviation.

Chest (pit to pit) 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 22″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1940s Yellowstone Park souvenir belt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271791865076
This vintage belt was made in the late 1940s as a souvenir of Yellowstone National Park. It has the belt buckle commonly used on this era of studded belt. The studwork spelling out Yellowstone Park is done in rhinestones instead of the more typical solid metal studs. It is stamped on the back a size 36 and measures 32″ to the smallest hole and 37″ to the largest.
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