1930s Fifth Avenue Year Bonded double breasted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271670853068
This vintage overcoat was made in the 1930s and was sold under the Fifth Avenue Year Bonded Clothes label. The coat is a 3×6 double breasted, with flapped pockets and a breast pocket. The back is belted, and the coat is half-lined, with a flannel underlayer to the lining. The coat is made from a heavy boucle wool, giving it a nice textural depth. I can find no wear to the coat, and the rear vent was never opened.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 47-1/2″

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1930s half-zip, half button moose pattern camp blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281498553174
This vintage coat was made in the 1930s from moose patterned wool camp blanket material. The coat is made in a rare pattern, with a half-zip bottom and a 3×6 double breasted top that was made in small numbers between about 1934-1939, notably by Congress Sportswear as part of their Maine Guide line. Most were made from red and black Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, but this one is made of a more distinctive camp blanket. The blanket material has a red background with orange and camel colored stripes, approximating sunrise, and black moose. I have found several examples of this moose-meets-deco patterned Indian Blanket from other sources that have been attributed to the Pendleton Woolen mills, but none with a surviving label, so I can’t be sure. LL Bean was selling a similar coat in the mid 1930s from their figural mallard patterned blankets. The jacket has two handwarmer pockets and a yoke which forms the “chest protector” double breasted section. The coat has a zipper hood which buttons down into a collar. The hood spreads into a collar or zips into a hood with a Talon zipper, with a deco-lined slider and rounded slider-to-puller assembly only produced in the mid 1930s, and a bell-shaped pull. The original owner must have loved this coat, the main zipper, probably a grommet Talon was replaced with a 1950s Talon. Wear to the hem was repaired with patches and stitching. The chest was darned. The underarm and front corner were patched with buffalo plaid wool. But with such a distinctive coat, both in terms of material and in terms of cut, who can blame them?

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

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1920s TW Stevenson leather lined shawl collar mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271666301961
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in the 1920s by the TW Stevenson Mfg. Co of Minneapolis. Stevenson was a producer of mackinaw coats and leather jackets from the late 1800s through the 1930s. The company was headquartered at 416 N. 1st Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
This coat is an early-style shawl collared mackinaw. It is double breasted, belted, with patch pockets and is constructed from heavy brown mackinaw wool. The coat is fully leather lined, body and sleeves. Such leather linings were popular in the 1910s-1920s as a windproof layer in outdoor / workwear coats. Starting in the late 1920s, leather became a more a more popular material for coat exteriors, and the popularity of the position wool and leather switched. The coat has the name Walter Sternitzke written in the lining, though the coat was probably originally purchased by his father, Reinhold Sternizke, a farmer from the town of Aitkin, Minnesota.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 37″

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1920s Marx Made Cravenette overcoat trench coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271654468359
This vintage coat was made by Marx & Haas in the mid to late 1920s. The Marx-Made logo found on this jacket was introduced in 1921 and was used through to the late 1920s. The jacket is wool gabardine that has been Cravenette Processed to shed showers. The process became a generic at this period for coats that doubled as lightweight overcoats and as raincoats. The “double service – for clear days for storm days” slogan of Crafenette’s was phased out by the late 1920s. The coat is a double breasted trench coat style, introduced c. 1915. It was originally belted, with an extremely high belt. It is unlined save for the sleeves. There are pass-through pockets to access the contents of your suit pockets without unbuttoning the coat. The fabric is stamped with the Cravenette logo

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 43″

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Late 1930s Mongolama overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271647982141
This vintage overcoat was made in the very late 1930s or early 1940s from “Mongolama” cloth, and was sold in Bozeman, Montana by Wagner Bros. It is a double breasted cut, in a heavy gray wool blend fabric. It has lazy peak lapels, a belted back, cuffed sleeves, and a 3×6 double breasted fastening, a very 1930s style. It has a 1939 Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America union tag which puts its manufacture between 1939 and 1949. The style, and the date range where Mongolama was advertised put it at the earliest end of this time frame. The coat is fully lined, which is somewhat unusual for overcoats of this period.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 47″

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1940s Hercules Aviator leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281464398498
This vintage leather jacket was made c.1947 and was sold by Sears, Roebuck and Co under their Hercules label, used for leather jackets and workwear. The jacket is an “aviator” style, a style originated in the 1930s, and defined by its offset zipper front, coat style lapels, interesting pocket setup and usually by its fancy back. This example has handwarmer pockets, a chest mounted map pocket and an angled cuff detail with decorative buttons. The back is belted and has bi-swing shoulders. It has a scalloped back yoke. The main zipper is a Talon, identifiable as being made immediately post-war by its marked U shaped stop box design and square hole on the pull. The chest zipper is also a Talon, with a chain style pull and a transitional style slider. With a 42″ chest, this will best fit someone who wears a size 38.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 23-1/2″

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c. 1935 Congress Sportswear half-zip, half button point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271624812561
This vintage coat was made c.1935 by Congress Sportswear and would likely have been sold under the “Maine Guide” label. This is a highly unusual and short lived style produced by Congress, with a half-zip, half-button front. The bottom half zipped up with a Talon grommet zipper, and the top with a 3×6 double breasted closure, which can be buttoned closed, buttoned like coat lapels, or open like 19th century military uniforms. The coat has a zip hood, which can be folded up and snapped (with early United Carr snaps) to form a collar. The coat is unlined, as is typical of these early mackinaw coats, and has taped seams.
The coat is readily identifiable as a Congress Sportswear product by several details. Congress was one of the only manufacturers to produce this half-and-half style, but details, like the un-hemmed bottom edge, and the contrast pocket trim and cuff adjusters are unique to Maine Guide products. These coats were produced by Congress for several other house labels, namely Abercombie and Fitch.
The coat is made from Hudson’s Bay Company point blanket, with a 1930s label. This fabric was, at the time, one of the most expensive wool fabrics available for high-end outdoors garments. The zipper is identifiable as being manufactured in the mid 1930s by its bell shape, the deco rays found both on the slider and the pull and by the oval shaped attachment piece between the slider and pull, which had been replaced by the later 1930s by a square sided bersion. The grommets of the grommet zipper, as well as the primitive stop-box, are still in place, although the current zipper, slightly shorter than the original, can be identified as a later production model Talon by its rounded edged pull and stop-box design.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 36-1/2″

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