1940s Maine Guide Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281537094331
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat is unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
(doubled = 46″) Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35=1/2″

 photo DSCF8312.jpg

 photo DSCF8313.jpg

 photo DSCF8314.jpg

 photo DSCF8315.jpg

 photo DSCF8316.jpg

 photo DSCF8317.jpg

 photo DSCF8318.jpg

 photo DSCF8319.jpg

 photo DSCF8320.jpg

 photo DSCF8321.jpg

1930s Pendleton striped blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281537063063
This vintage coat was made in the early 1930s from striped point blanket material. While the Hudson’s Bay Company point blankets had a striped pattern with four stripes at each end of the blanket running indigo, yellow, red, green, this coat was made from a blanket with a continuous stripe patterned blanket running red, orange, indigo, green and then repeating. While there are no labels on this coat, I have seen this blanket pattern attributed to the Pendleton woolen mills. The pattern of the blanket has been inverted for the sleeves and runs vertically for the collar, giving some real interest there. The coat has handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets. It has a double breasted cut and as is typical of mackinaw coats produced in the 1930s and prior, this example was made unlined.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

 photo DSCF8204.jpg

 photo DSCF8205.jpg

 photo DSCF8206.jpg

 photo DSCF8207.jpg

 photo DSCF8208.jpg

 photo DSCF8209.jpg

1920s WisGarCo brown tweed double breasted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271712630927
This overcoat was made in the 1920s by the Wisconsin Garment Company, a manufacturer of overcoats and mackinaw coats that operated in the 1910s-early 1930s. Wisgarco was located at 2019 North avenue, Burlington Wisconsin and produced their coats under the Wisgarco label, and their workwear and uniform lines under the Wisconsin Garment Company label. The coat is made from an incredible brown tweed with a blue overplaid. It is double breasted, with a boxy cut, wide droopy peak lapels and flapped pockets. The coat is half-lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (base of collar to hem): 47″

 photo editwisgarco.jpg

 photo DSCF7496-1.jpg

 photo DSCF7497.jpg

 photo DSCF7499.jpg

 photo DSCF7500.jpg

 photo DSCF7501.jpg

 photo DSCF7502.jpg

 photo DSCF7505.jpg

 photo DSCF7506.jpg

1930s-1940s John David double breasted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271712674846
This vintage overcoat was made in the 1930s-early 1940s by John David of New York. It is double breasted with a 3×6 buttoning and a belted back. The coat is fully lined. It has an Amalgamated Clothing workers of America label, but the way it is stitched, I can’t tell if it is a 1936 or 1939 variant. The styling of the coat points to a pre-war date of manufacture. This is an extremely heavy overcoat.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 48″

 photo editjohndavid.jpg

 photo DSCF7507.jpg

 photo DSCF7508.jpg

 photo DSCF7512.jpg

 photo DSCF7513.jpg

 photo DSCF7514.jpg

 photo DSCF7515.jpg

 photo DSCF7518.jpg

 photo DSCF7522.jpg

 photo DSCF7523.jpg

1930s National Clothing Co. Alpacuna double breasted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271689389026
This vintage coat was made in the late 1930s for the National Clothing Company of Rochester, NY out of Alpacuna Fabric. The coat is double breasted with raglan shoulders and a belted back. The coat is fully lined and has a vertical interior pocket.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Center of collar to end of cuff: 35-1/2″ (equivalent to 26″ sleeves and 19″ shoulders)
Length (base of collar to hem): 46″

 photo editalpacuna.jpg

 photo IMG_0325.jpg

 photo IMG_0327.jpg

 photo IMG_0330.jpg

 photo IMG_0331.jpg

 photo IMG_0333.jpg

 photo IMG_0336.jpg

 photo IMG_0337.jpg

 photo IMG_0338.jpg

 photo IMG_0339.jpg

1930s Fifth Avenue Year Bonded double breasted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271670853068
This vintage overcoat was made in the 1930s and was sold under the Fifth Avenue Year Bonded Clothes label. The coat is a 3×6 double breasted, with flapped pockets and a breast pocket. The back is belted, and the coat is half-lined, with a flannel underlayer to the lining. The coat is made from a heavy boucle wool, giving it a nice textural depth. I can find no wear to the coat, and the rear vent was never opened.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 47-1/2″

 photo IMG_0047-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0048-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0049-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0050-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0053-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0056-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0057.jpg

 photo IMG_0059-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0062-1.jpg

1930s half-zip, half button moose pattern camp blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281498553174
This vintage coat was made in the 1930s from moose patterned wool camp blanket material. The coat is made in a rare pattern, with a half-zip bottom and a 3×6 double breasted top that was made in small numbers between about 1934-1939, notably by Congress Sportswear as part of their Maine Guide line. Most were made from red and black Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, but this one is made of a more distinctive camp blanket. The blanket material has a red background with orange and camel colored stripes, approximating sunrise, and black moose. I have found several examples of this moose-meets-deco patterned Indian Blanket from other sources that have been attributed to the Pendleton Woolen mills, but none with a surviving label, so I can’t be sure. LL Bean was selling a similar coat in the mid 1930s from their figural mallard patterned blankets. The jacket has two handwarmer pockets and a yoke which forms the “chest protector” double breasted section. The coat has a zipper hood which buttons down into a collar. The hood spreads into a collar or zips into a hood with a Talon zipper, with a deco-lined slider and rounded slider-to-puller assembly only produced in the mid 1930s, and a bell-shaped pull. The original owner must have loved this coat, the main zipper, probably a grommet Talon was replaced with a 1950s Talon. Wear to the hem was repaired with patches and stitching. The chest was darned. The underarm and front corner were patched with buffalo plaid wool. But with such a distinctive coat, both in terms of material and in terms of cut, who can blame them?

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

 photo editmoosemackinaw.jpg

 photo IMG_0001-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0002-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0003-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0004-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0007-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0008-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0013-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0014-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0015-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0017-2.jpg

 photo IMG_0019-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0021-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0022-3.jpg

 photo IMG_0023-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0024-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0010-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0016-2.jpg

 photo 67554_449439675133281_500350770_n.jpg

 photo 193901.jpeg

 photo editbeancoat.jpg