1930s – 1940s Hercules shawl collared leather coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271547750220
This vintage coat was made for Sears in the 1940s and was sold under their Hercules workwear label. The coat is made of black front quarter horsehide with a brown mouton collar. It is double breasted, with a shawl collar, handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets, square yokes front and back and buttoned adjuster belts on the cuffs. The coat has a quilted cotton lining, lighter in weight than the typical sheepskin lining found in this style coat. Sleeve linings are purple, and have knitted cuffs to keep the wind out. The Hercules label is of the style used in the 1940s, however the last time I can find this model in any Sears catalog is in the Fall 1940 edition. This style of double breasted, shawl collared, hip length leather coat was popular in the 1920s and 1930s and changed very little through its production run. By WWII, this style coat would have been considered old fashioned and was replaced by zip-front sheeplined surcoat style jackets.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 33″

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1940s Hart Schaffner & Marx single breasted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281347291603
This vintage overcoat was made in the 1940s by Hart Schaffner & Marx and was sold by Moore, which had locations in San Francisco and Oakland, California. It is made of lightweight light-brown salt and pepper wool. It has a single breasted cut with a fly front, wide peak lapels, and button adjustment belts on the cuffs.

Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 42″

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Yellow Point Blanket Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271506036864
This vintage coat was made by the United Colors of Benetton. It is made of striped point blanket material, like that made famous by the Hudson’s Bay blanket coats, but in a vibrant yellow, red, green and gray pattern never offered by the HBC. The collar is backed with corduroy. The coat is single breasted, with patch pockets.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

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Monarch horsehide barnstormer leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271493775559
This vintage jacket was made by Monarch Mfg. of Milwaukee WI in the late 1930s or early 1940s. It is a belted, double breasted style. This has since come to be known among collectors as a barnstormer style, named after the aviators of the 1920s who wore similar styles. The jacket is made of russet horsehide, with a 3×6 double breasted front. There are handwarmer pockets (known originally as “muff” pockets), as well as flapped cargo pockets. These have deeply scalloped pocket flaps. The jacket is lined with blanket wool in the body, with quilted shoulders and sleeves. The U shaped seam between the two lining materials is a detail I have only seen on other Monarch jackets. The label is of a style used in the 1930s through about the end of WWII. The leather has some really incredible grain, highlighted by decades of usage. The treatment of the seams is unusual. Whereas most jackets, leather or otherwise, will have a seam at the edge of the jacket, or on the edge of the lapels, this one minimizes them by folding the leather around to form the front and back panel.

A bit about Monarch, from a piece I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”:
The Monarch Manufacturing Company was founded in 1892 by Paul Asch. In 1917, they relocated to a new factory, located at 246 East Chicago St., Milwaukee, WI. They built at least four more factories in Milwaukee, employing over a thousand workers by 1922. Throughout the life of the company, they specialized in leather, sheepskin and fabric outerwear for men and boys. They produced A-2 contracts during WWII.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length (collar seam to hem): 30″

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1930s Red Head Brand half-moon hunting vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271492450158
This vest was made in the 1930s by Red Head Brand, a high end maker of hunting and outdoorsman’s garments. This style has come to be known as a half-moon hunting vest, after the shape of its pass through pockets into the game pouch. Period advertisements generally referred to this style as a sleeveless jacket rather than as a vest. This one has pleated, flapped patch pockets on the front, as well as two patch pockets on the lining. There is a roomy breast pocket, just the right size for a pack of cigarettes, The half-moons pass through to the roomy internal game pocket, which closes with a button.

The vest still has the original Red Head tag, shaped, appropriately, like a duck. The tag reads – “Red Head Fits The Sport. The Red Head duck signifies that this article is backed by years of experience in the equipping of sportsmen. It is your guarantee that nothing has been spared to assure you of satisfaction in the field – that the Red Head standard of quality, workmanship, and above all, the integrity of the Red Head Brand, known by sportsmen for over forty years, is the inimitable ingredient of the product. Play safe and look for this symbol when purchasing outdoor equipment – Red Head Brand Co. – Chicago”

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Length: 27″

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1920s Duxbak hunting coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271482181910
This vintage canvas hunting jacket was made in the 1920s by Duxbak. It is their early style of hunting coat, introduced in the first decade of the 20th century, with double hip pockets, and a double breast pocket. For both, the double pockets share a single flap. This jacket has the early version of what would later become the “half-moon” pocket, a pass through on the front of the coat to the interior game pocket. The jacket is a double thickness. The pockets have been lined/patched with selvedge salt and pepper cotton. Underarms are double-panel gusseted and have ventilation grommets. There is a calendar in the pocket dated 1939, presumably the last time this coat was worn in earnest. With the amount of wear put on it, its safe to say it dates from some time before that. The style of label and style of the coat confirm a 1920s date of manufacture.

Tagged size: 42
Chest (pit to pit): 25-1/2″ (51″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

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1940s Penney’s Belt Back Mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281321564485
This vintage coat was made in the 1940s, and was sold by Penney’s. It is made of plaid wool- 65% reprocessed and 35% new. The use of reprocessed wool like this was common on work coats of the period. It is double breasted, with handwarmers on the chest and flapped cargo pockets. It has a belted back. The coat is lined in plaid cotton. It has seen heavy wear and usage, with wear, damage and repairs throughout much of the coat. The collar has been altered with an additional buttonhole and button to securely cinch the coat up in cold working conditions.

Tagged size: 46
Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

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1940s hunting coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271449021284
This vintage hunting coat is made from brown canvas, with a brown corduroy collar. It has large cargo pockets with shotgun shell loops inside, reinforced shoulders and an internal buttoned game pouch. It is half-lined with plaid flannel.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 26″

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1950 JC Higgins hunting coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281304264630
This vintage coat was made in the early 1950s for Sears. It was sold under the JC Higgins label. It is made from heavy red and black plaid mackinaw cloth. There are handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets. There is a game pouch on the back. The coat is lined in a different plaid, with rayon linings in the sleeves. This model can be seen in the page from the 1950 Sears catalog below. This model goes back with few changes to the 1930s, but earlier models had patch cargo pockets.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 29″

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1930s Brewster Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281303524987
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in Camden, Maine by the J.A. Brewster company. The company was founded in the 19th century by Jarvis Adelbert Brewster. The company produced high quality outerwear for the harsh Maine winters, with locations in Camden and Freeport Maine. The LL Bean flagship store would later be built at the site of Brewster’s Freeport location. Brewster produced the first run of red wool outdoorsman’s shirts for the Boy Scouts in the 1940s.

This coat was made in the late 1930s. The style is pure function, with an oversized collar to block out harsh winter winds. A throat latch / chinstrap makes sure it stays snug when up. The coat is double breasted, with handwarmer pockets on the chest and patch pockets on the hips. As was the style up through the 1930s, this coat is unlined. To make up for the lack of lining and still retain warmth, these early coats were made of super thick wool. After WWII, when lighter weight coats began to be more popular, quilted linings made up for the lower quality of the shell. This one has some of the thickest wool I’ve seen on this type of coat. The tag position is consistent with the dating- later coats by this maker generally had the tag on the inside by the collar.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (collar to hem): 30″

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