Late 1930s Mongolama overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271647982141
This vintage overcoat was made in the very late 1930s or early 1940s from “Mongolama” cloth, and was sold in Bozeman, Montana by Wagner Bros. It is a double breasted cut, in a heavy gray wool blend fabric. It has lazy peak lapels, a belted back, cuffed sleeves, and a 3×6 double breasted fastening, a very 1930s style. It has a 1939 Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America union tag which puts its manufacture between 1939 and 1949. The style, and the date range where Mongolama was advertised put it at the earliest end of this time frame. The coat is fully lined, which is somewhat unusual for overcoats of this period.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 47″

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1940s Patrick Duluth Hollywood jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281479077025
This vintage jacket was made by the FA Patrick Company of Duluth, Minnesota. It is made in blue-gray striped wool, in a casual Hollywood jacket style. It has three patch pockets and a wide collar. From the label and styling, this jacket dates from the late 1940s to early 1950s.
Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

A bit about the company, from a history piece I wrote for “The Fedora Lounge”
: The F.A. Patrick Company, proprietors of the Patrick-Duluth Woolen Mills of Duluth, Minnesota were responsible for taking the Mackinaw coat out of lumber camps of western Canada and introducing them to students, workmen and athletes across the United States. Early on, the Patrick Company were jobbers, making dry goods, primarily for clients in the Northwest of the United States in Canada. In 1901, Patrick began buying fabric from a Scandinavian mackinaw cloth factory in Fosston, Minnesota. In 1906, seeing potential, Patrick bought that factory and began making their own Mackinaw cloth, eventually becoming one of its leading producers. The fabric and the coats made from it were popular with miners, fur trappers, lumberjacks and hunters.

In 1912, Patrick launched a new, refined mackinaw design. It was double breasted, belted and sported a collar described in the ads of the period as a “nansen” collar. Though the term also existed then, we now refer to this style as a shawl collar. The coat was 35″ long and was available in 24 and 32 oz wool mackinaw cloth, in a wide variety of colors. Salesman Harry Harrington began to pitch the Patrick Mackinaw to clothiers in college towns. “It was not long after that that mackinaws became a fad with students generally, and as the college student invariably sets the styles for young men’s clothing, it quickly spread over the whole country”. The early mackinaw trend was marketed in a similar way to the current workwear trend, trading on the rugged associations of the workers for whom the garment was originally designed. The mackinaw fad boomed, and shortly, a number of other manufacturers sprung onto the scene, producing mackinaws of varying quality from a variety of cloths. Large quantities of Patrick mackinaws were sold through such high end stores as Brooks Brothers, Rogers Peet, Wannamaker, Abercrombie and Fitch, Brokaw Brothers, and A. Raymond.
It is around this 1912-1913 period where the name “Mackinaw” begins to be more associated with the short, double breasted, shawl collar style, and less with the mackinaw cloth material from which it was made. The fad lasted about a year and a half. Patrick could not keep up with the growing demand caused by the collegiate fad, and the inferior fabric quality of some competitors led to the downfall of this first-wave craze.

Seeing the end of the craze, Patrick-Duluth re-branded its mackinaw once again, refining its pattern and marketing it to farmers, children, hunters and outdoorsmen, workers, and sportsmen. Its durability, warmth, low price compared to comparable overcoats or sheeplined coats, made it an easy sell to these markets. Alongside sheeplined canvas coats, Patrick Mackinaws became the de-facto winter coat of railroad employees. To further expand the market, patterns were made for men and women, boys and girls. Patrick intensified their national advertising, placing ads in the Saturday Evening Post, Country Gentleman, Farm Journal, Woman’s World, American Boy, Youth’s Companion, Boy’s Life, and many more. The name of the product was shortened from “Patrick-Duluth Woolen Mill Mackinaw” to simply “Patrick”, in a bid to make their brand name the generic trade name on the market, thereby foiling the business of competitors. Their slogan “Bigger than Weather” was penned by Elbert Hubbard. Ads were illustrated by Peter Newell and Clare Briggs. In the years between 1911 and 1914, Patrick had quadrupled its production, expanding from their two story mill to a six story mill on Duluth habror, a garment factory in Duluth, and knitting and spinning mills in Mankato, MN.

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1950s Lockshire gabardine overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281472843346
This vintage overcoat was made in the 1950s by Lockshire of Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is single breasted, with notch lapels. It has a vented back and slash handwarmer pockets. It is half-lined, as was customary at that point. The jacket has a fantastic label and a 1949 union tag. With a 48″ chest, this will best fit someone who wears a size 42 suit.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 46-1/2″

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1950s Frankoat tweed Chesterfield overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281470030913
This vintage coat was made in the 1950s by Frank Bros under the Frankoat label. It was sold in Vincennes, Indiana by Albert’s, Inc. It is made of a gray tweed wool, with a velvet collar to give it that Chesterfield overcoat style. By the way it wraps from the front to the back of the collar, my guess would be that the velvet collar was added by a tailor after the coat’s initial manufacture. The coat has a plain back and cuffed sleeves.

Chest (pit to pit): 27″ (doubled = 54″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 45″

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Brooks Brothers Chesterfield Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271627538100
This vintage Chesterfield overcoat was made in the 1940s for Brooks Brothers. It is made of high quality wool, with a fly front, peak lapels and a velvet collar. It is fully lined, with two inside pockets. According to the hanger chain, it was originally owned by a Jacques Sammes.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 42″

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1940s Maine Guide by Congress Hudson’s Bay point blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271617873047
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat was originally unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns. At some point a lining was added to the jacket, but not finished on the bottom edge. When you lift this later lining, you can see the original tags from the Hudson’s Bay Company and from Maine Guide, as well as the taped seams that indicate its original unlined construction. The coat was originally sold by Hudson’s Sport Store of Detroit.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 34″

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Here’s a shot of a green version of this same maker and model which I sold earlier in the year, showing what the lining/construction is like without the later lining overlay  photo green.jpg

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Eddie Bauer Blanket Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271617906330
This jacket was sold by Eddie Bauer. It is made from Indian Blanket style wool fabric- from the texture and particular pattern, I would guess made by the Woolrich Woolen Mills. The jacket has a leather collar and corozo buttons. It is fully lined. Despite being labeled a size Medium, with a 54″ chest, this would best fit someone who wears a size 48 jacket.

Tagged size: Medium
Chest (pit to pit): 27″ (doubled = 54″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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